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Independent Counsel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1999
Does Paul Conrad have amnesia regarding the Independent Counsel Act (Commentary, July 12)? He has obviously forgotten that the act was conceived by a Democratic Congress and used many times for political purposes by the Democrats. Now that a Democratic president has suffered, Democrats are willing to abolish the act. JAMES DEVORE Costa Mesa
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- The state Senate's ethics panel was briefed behind closed doors Monday by an independent counsel on his investigation into misconduct allegations involving Sen. Ronald S. Calderon (D- Montebello ). The briefing was called by Sen. Richard Roth (D-Riverside), chairman of the Senate Committee on Legislative Ethics, who said afterward that the review by independent counsel Charles J. Stevens was not yet complete. "We met to begin the conversation with the outside counsel," Roth said afterward.
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NEWS
March 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy, whose run-in with an independent counsel cost him $1.5 million in legal bills, says his experience casts doubt on the whole institution. Espy, one of several speakers on a panel examining the fate of the independent counsel law, was acquitted in December of 30 charges that he accepted gifts and entertainment from companies or organizations regulated by the agency. He is now a private attorney in Jackson, Miss.
SPORTS
February 6, 2013 | By David Wharton
An independent counsel has completed his review of the NCAA enforcement program and is expected to submit a report late next week. The college governing body called upon Kenneth L. Wainstein, former homeland security advisor to President George W. Bush, after the recent announcement of potentially severe misconduct by investigators in the long-standing University of Miami case. NCAA staff members allegedly paid the criminal defense attorney for Nevin Shapiro - a former booster at the center of the Miami scandal - to improperly obtain information for an investigation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1998 | LEE HARRIS
Here's the rundown on guests and topics for the weekend's public-affairs programs: Today "Today": Race-car driving school; low-fat holiday foods; Thanksgiving recipes; skating performance of "The Little Mermaid," 5 a.m. KNBC. "Evans, Novak, Hunt & Shields": Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge, 2:30 p.m. CNN. "John McLaughlin's One on One": Private records, 2:30 p.m. KCET. "Tony Brown's Journal": The Black Summit of 1972, 3:30 p.m. KCET.
NEWS
February 23, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, attempting to resolve a constitutional clash between Congress and the White House, announced Monday that it will decide whether the independent counsel law is a legal way to attack high-level government corruption or an unconstitutional infringement on the President's power. The court will examine the crucial question of how the counsels are appointed--by a special three-judge panel, as directed by the 1978 Ethics in Government Act, rather than by the executive branch.
NEWS
June 25, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal judge Wednesday scheduled a public hearing next Wednesday on Lt. Col. Oliver L. North's challenge to independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh's authority to investigate the Iran- contra affair. The issue is the central aspect of North's otherwise secret court battle resisting a grand jury subpoena for a sample of his handwriting. North had been held in contempt of court for refusing to provide the sample, but the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1987
It is most enlightening to read what former White House aide Michael Deaver had to say in April, 1986, when he asked his friend, Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III, to seek appointment of an independent counsel concerning charges of conflict of interest. I quote from The Times story as reported on April 29: "Elementary due process and fairness to me and my family require appointment of an independent counsel. "While I'm grateful for the President's continuing support, the climate has become such that this is the only way to resolve the issue fairly.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2010 | By Kevin Canfield
Shortly after Duquesne University law professor Ken Gormley decided to write a book about the crisis that almost ended Bill Clinton's presidency, a powerful publishing figure offered some advice. "I won't name names, but a very prominent agent said: 'No one's going to care about the Clintons in another year or two, they're passé,' " Gormley said recently over lunch here. "This was in 2000." Later, when it looked as if Hillary Clinton might win the 2008 Democratic nomination, other would-be experts urged Gormley to get his book out. But his publisher decided to stick with the writer's timeline, deeming it too important to be rushed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2008 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
Can Ken Starr tame Malibu's rabid paparazzi? That's what Malibu officials are hoping as they turn to the independent counsel who investigated President Clinton's involvement with White House intern Monica Lewinsky to help them craft restrictions on "pap packs" that descend on the celebrity-rich coastal town. Malibu officials say their town has been overrun by members of the celebrity media, who camp out at the city's few shopping centers and follow celebrities down Pacific Coast Highway.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Robert Ray, a former independent counsel who investigated President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky, turned himself in to police on charges of stalking a former girlfriend, according to the Manhattan district attorney's office. New York police say Ray's former girlfriend, a 40-year-old Manhattan woman, filed a complaint that he persisted in sending e-mail and knocking on her door months after she broke off their relationship.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
After about 10 years and $21 million spent investigating former Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros, the last independent counsel from the Clinton era officially ended his probe Thursday, complaining he needed more time to unravel what might have been a massive "coverup at high levels of our government." David M. Barrett, a former Republican lawyer and lobbyist who was appointed in 1995 to investigate the Democrat, issued a 474-page "Final Report of the Independent Counsel."
NATIONAL
October 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Senate decided Thursday that it was time to close a decade-old, $20-million investigation of former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G. Cisneros -- years after Cisneros received a presidential pardon. The amendment to a spending bill, approved by voice vote, would require that the report of independent counsel David Barrett be made public within 60 days and that the independent counsel close his office within 90 days after the report is published.
NATIONAL
October 4, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
When members of Congress let the independent counsel law expire after a string of scandals in the 1980s and 1990s, Democrats and Republicans alike were happy to see it go. Now, the flap over a suspected national security leak from the White House is shaping up as the first big test of how to investigate the executive branch since the much-maligned law died. And already, a whole new set of problems is emerging.
OPINION
October 2, 2003
Re "Bush Says Leak Probe Is Job for Justice Dept.," Oct. 1: It looks like the cover-ups and lies will continue, as long as President Bush and his cronies dodge an independent counsel investigation regarding the leak of the CIA officer's identity. I figure if an independent counsel was good enough to entrap President Clinton, then it is good enough to catch the real crooks and liars in the present administration. Allowing them to handle their own investigations is beyond absurd and, once again, they will find a scapegoat to shift the blame off Dubya, Vice President Dick Cheney, Karl Rove and the other unethical, pertinent players in this administration.
OPINION
October 2, 2003
President Bush is right. The Justice Department, not a special counsel, should investigate allegations that an administration official illegally leaked the name of a CIA employee whose husband had authoritatively disputed White House claims that Iraq attempted to buy uranium ore in Niger. Neither an appointed special counsel nor a new independent counsel act -- which Sen. Joe Lieberman (D-Conn.), a presidential candidate, is calling for -- would be helpful or desirable.
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