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NEWS
August 22, 1988 | Jonathan Peterson
Economists look at several gauges to trace trends in inflation. Here is a glance at a few of them: Consumer price index: The most widely quoted barometer of consumer inflation, the CPI is based on price changes in such goods and services as housing, food, transportation, health care, entertainment and others.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
A citywide coalition of community groups and civil rights leaders unveiled a comprehensive new measure Monday ranking L.A. Unified's neediest schools and urged more targeted spending on students there. The "student need index," which analyzed test scores, dropout rates, gun violence, asthma and eight other factors that affect learning, found that the neediest schools were concentrated in southern and eastern Los Angeles, along with the Pacoima area in the San Fernando Valley. The schools included Fremont and Jordan high schools, Bethune and Drew middle schools and Griffith Joyner and Woodcrest elementary schools.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 1987 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
The California State Teachers Retirement System, one of the nation's largest public pension funds, Tuesday announced a major change in the management of its portfolio that could signal a trend among other large public pension funds.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Consumers are more optimistic about the economy than they've been in years, and that could help heat up the recovery after a deep winter chill. A closely watched barometer of consumer confidence surged this month to its highest level in more than six years. The report by the Conference Board on Tuesday added to indications that some weak economic data in recent months were caused by unusually bad weather and were not a harbinger of a more protracted slowdown. "Consumer confidence made significant progress in March, indicating that the winter economic blues … are somewhat behind us," said Chris Christopher, director of consumer economics at IHS Global Insight.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A grass-roots effort to harness the power of the masses has recently emerged to solve one of the most intractable problems of the Internet--indexing the vastness of the Web. The Open Directory project has mushroomed in the last year, suddenly becoming a credible competitor to the dominance of search leader Yahoo.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1999 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dispute is escalating between online auction leader EBay and Web sites that search and display content from a range of online auctioneers that could have far-reaching effects on e-commerce. The conflict could help determine how comparison shopping evolves and may influence disputes over who owns or controls user-created content on Web sites, say industry watchers and legal experts. At issue is whether so-called auction aggregators, such as Bidder's Edge and AuctionWatch.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stung by criticism that search engines have fallen hopelessly behind in indexing the 800 million pages of the World Wide Web, several search companies have launched themselves on a Herculean effort to scan and review the entire expanse of cyberspace. Excite@Home, which operates Excite, the third-most popular search engine, Monday announced plans to look at the Web's entirety using a new technology that will be deployed in the next few weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1991 | RUSSELL CHANDLER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The little-known Ancient Biblical Manuscript Center in Claremont may make the next significant breakthrough in deciphering the still-unpublished portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls when it releases a complete index of the ancient documents next year. Without an accurate index, looking at the documents is a little like digging for treasure without a map.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2005
Although fixing the alternative minimum tax ("Alternative Tax May Hit More," Personal Finance, Dec. 11) may reduce tax revenues, it is important to return the AMT to its original intention. The AMT was set up to capture taxes from wealthy individuals who were avoiding taxes. The original error was not indexing the AMT deduction for inflation. Now it is affecting middle-income taxpayers. The correct answer to returning the AMT to its original intention is to index the AMT deduction for inflation starting in the 1970s, when it was first enacted.
NEWS
July 8, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If searching the World Wide Web for that one nugget of information already seems like a bad trip into a quagmire of data, Internet researchers have bad news for you--the situation is only getting worse. Even the most comprehensive search engine today is aware of no more than 16% of the estimated 800 million pages on the Web, according to a study to be published today in the scientific journal Nature.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2014 | By Andrew Khouri
Home prices nationally posted their best year since 2005, but signs are growing that the housing rebound has stalled. Prices in the 20 largest metro areas have dropped slightly for two months in a row, according to the S&P/Case-Shiller index, a leading national home price gauge. Demand is waning because of higher prices and mortgage rates, and home buyers have only modest expectations for price appreciation, said Robert J. Shiller, a Yale economist and co-creator of the index.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Consumers opened their wallets more than expected in December even though their incomes failed to grow, but their confidence slipped in January amid concerns about whether the recent upturn in economic momentum can be sustained. Spending rose 0.4% in December after an upwardly revised 0.6% increase the previous month, the Commerce Department reported Friday. Economists had projected only a 0.2% rise for December. Consumers spent more even though personal income was flat in December, a worrisome sign for future activity.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Consumer confidence slipped this month amid concerns about whether the recent upturn in momentum can be sustained, according to data released Friday. The consumer sentiment index from the University of Michigan and Thomson Reuters dropped to 81.2, from 82.5 the previous month. The reading was in line with economists' projections. The January figure was well above the 73.8 level recorded for the same month a year ago, and confidence was slightly improved from the preliminary January number.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Target continues to suffer blowback from the breach of as many as 40 million customer credit and debit card accounts it disclosed last week, as consumer perception of the chain plunges and calls for an investigation intensify. Consumers' perception of Target dropped to the lowest point - a minus 19 - since at least June 2007, according to a survey Monday by sentiment tracking service YouGov BrandIndex. It's also the first time in more than six years that negative perception of Target has outweighed positive feelings about the brand.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
First came the Dow. Then the S&P 500. And now the Nasdaq is reaching a milestone. The technology-laden Nasdaq composite index briefly jumped above 4,000 on Monday, the first time it has hit that mark since the collapse of the dot-com bubble 13 years ago. The once-obscure index initially crossed that level for the first time at the end of 1999. It became a symbol of the tech boom that some thought would parallel the Industrial Revolution. Instead, the Nasdaq tumbled below 4,000 four months later as investors' infatuation with unprofitable companies such as Pets.com and EToys burned itself out. The index remains far below its all-time close of 5,048.62 in March 2000.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton and Andrew Tangel
The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 16,000 for the first time, a testament to investors' hope that the plodding economy can gain momentum in the coming year. The index, a gauge of 30 of the largest American companies, jumped more than 109 points to close at 16,009.99. Thursday's advance was propelled by a better-than-expected drop in jobless claims and a Senate panel's vote supporting Janet Yellen's bid to lead the Federal Reserve. The stock market is caught up in its most furious rally in a decade.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
The Treasury's second sale of inflation-indexed notes drew far less demand than the inaugural sale in January, forcing the government to pay a higher-than-expected yield on the securities. The Treasury sold $8.003 billion of the notes Tuesday at a yield of 3.650%, up from 3.449% in January. The notes will mature in 9 3/4 years and will track, with a three-month lag, increases in the consumer price index as calculated by the Labor Department.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1999 | Charles Piller
In the latest salvo in a simmering war between Web auction leader EBay and other Web sites that scan and summarize content from various online auctioneers, EBay said that it has sued Bidder's Edge of Burlington, Mass. EBay, based in San Jose, objects to what it claims are inaccuracies in Bidder's Edge summaries, and demands that Bidder's Edge stop searching and displaying EBay's auction information. Bidder's Edge executives could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
A new stock index was launched Wednesday to help investors keep track of the investing strategies of some of the smartest minds on Wall Street. The iBillionaire index lists 30 large-cap stocks owned by billionaire investors, including Warren Buffett, Carl Icahn, Daniel Loeb, David Trepper and David Einhorn. Launched on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol, BILLION, the index will allow investors to model their portfolios after the stocks that these billionaires own, based on Securities and Exchange filings.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The service sector, a crucial driver of the U.S. economy, expanded more than forecast last month as business activity surged in a sign the partial government shutdown was not a drag on sales, a widely watched index indicates. The Institute of Supply Management said Tuesday that its purchasing managers' index for the service sector rose to 55.4 in October from 54.4 the previous month. Economists had projected just a slight increase to 54.5. Index readings above 50 indicate the sector is growing.
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