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BUSINESS
June 2, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
India on Monday unveiled a budget plan that doesn't do enough to spur domestic and foreign investment to reverse the country's economic slowdown, analysts and investors said. Finance Minister Yaswant Sinha's fiscal blueprint not only slows the pace of reform set in the last three budgets, but it reverses some of the opening of India's market to trade by raising import tariffs. "He has run out of ideas to kick-start the economy," said A.K. Kinra, corporate vice president for finance at J.K.
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BUSINESS
June 2, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
India on Monday unveiled a budget plan that doesn't do enough to spur domestic and foreign investment to reverse the country's economic slowdown, analysts and investors said. Finance Minister Yaswant Sinha's fiscal blueprint not only slows the pace of reform set in the last three budgets, but it reverses some of the opening of India's market to trade by raising import tariffs. "He has run out of ideas to kick-start the economy," said A.K. Kinra, corporate vice president for finance at J.K.
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NEWS
March 2, 1989
India's government has slashed defense spending and diverted funds to fight hunger and illiteracy and provide housing for the homeless. The unprecedented reduction in defense spending was contained in the government's budget for 1989-90, introduced in Parliament by Finance Minister S. B. Chavan. India will spend $133 million less on defense in the 1989-90 fiscal year compared to the previous year, Chavan said. He pledged to spend $1.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sweating Calcutta rickshaw wallah, the impoverished Bihari sharecropper and millions of other Indians struggling to get by were not consulted about it. But in the long run, they are meant to be the chief beneficiaries. In announcing India's 1994-95 budget this week, and disclosing the next moves in the government's economic reform game plan, Finance Minister Manmohan Singh spoke in detail of tax reform, revenue projections and the need to give stagnating industry a helpful push.
NEWS
March 5, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sweating Calcutta rickshaw wallah, the impoverished Bihari sharecropper and millions of other Indians struggling to get by were not consulted about it. But in the long run, they are meant to be the chief beneficiaries. In announcing India's 1994-95 budget this week, and disclosing the next moves in the government's economic reform game plan, Finance Minister Manmohan Singh spoke in detail of tax reform, revenue projections and the need to give stagnating industry a helpful push.
NEWS
March 1, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endeavoring to carry this nation to the "second industrial revolution," the government unveiled a budget Monday that, by cutting customs duties, widening rupee convertibility and easing taxes on manufacturers, further integrates India into the world economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1991
Japan hasn't been the only major nation with a shaky foreign policy during the Gulf War. But Washington was too preoccupied to notice New Delhi's diplomatic dithering. Nor is Iraq the only large country that has been riven lately by ethnic and religious tensions. India, the world's largest democracy and second most populous nation, has been shaken by a surge of Hindu militancy that could just threaten to make Baghdad's convulsions look not all that extraordinary.
WORLD
April 29, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. ambassador to India announced his resignation Thursday, citing a desire to spend more time with his family. Timothy J. Roemer's statement coincided with news that India had excluded two U.S. defense companies from a much-anticipated $11-billion deal for at least 126 fighter aircraft, fueling speculation in defense circles that the two were linked. Others, however, said the former six-term congressman from Indiana, a Democratic party stalwart, may have felt he was being sidelined in India and wanted to raise his profile back in Washington before President Obama's 2012 reelection bid. "I hear he wanted to get back to active politics," said Harinder Sekhon, a senior fellow in the U.S. studies program with New Delhi's Observer Research Foundation, a think tank.
WORLD
August 25, 2005 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
India's government is moving to keep a risky promise of guaranteed jobs for millions of rural poor despite warnings that it can't afford a multibillion-dollar welfare program. A national rural employment bill, which guarantees at least one worker in each household at least 100 days of manual labor a year, passed the lower house of Parliament late Tuesday. The upper house is expected to approve it in the coming weeks.
NEWS
June 11, 1985 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
The long-running "courtship of Rajiv Gandhi" is about to open in Washington after playing in Moscow, Cairo, Paris and Algiers. But the Indian prime minister's performance in the role of the world's most eligible nonaligned ruler was the rave of diplomatic circles here long before he took it on the road, beginning last month in the Soviet Union. He arrives in Washington today for a state visit and will meet with President Reagan at the White House on Wednesday.
NEWS
March 1, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endeavoring to carry this nation to the "second industrial revolution," the government unveiled a budget Monday that, by cutting customs duties, widening rupee convertibility and easing taxes on manufacturers, further integrates India into the world economy.
NEWS
March 2, 1989
India's government has slashed defense spending and diverted funds to fight hunger and illiteracy and provide housing for the homeless. The unprecedented reduction in defense spending was contained in the government's budget for 1989-90, introduced in Parliament by Finance Minister S. B. Chavan. India will spend $133 million less on defense in the 1989-90 fiscal year compared to the previous year, Chavan said. He pledged to spend $1.
WORLD
December 4, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld is expected to discuss the sale of sophisticated missiles and other weapons to India and Pakistan during a brief visit next week. Critics in the South Asian nations raised concerns that the potential sales could further fuel a regional arms race and political instability while the two rivals hold delicate peace talks.
WORLD
November 12, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
When India signed a contract to buy a $1-billion military radar system last month, foreign aid agencies were still searching for $50 million in donations to defeat the country's polio scourge. Across the border, Pakistan's armed forces were updating their multibillion-dollar shopping list, including a request for U.S.-made F-16 jets, while aid groups fighting a tuberculosis epidemic struggled against a lethal funding gap.
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