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July 18, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Khushwant Singh halted his tennis serve in mid-swing and cupped his ear. As his playing companions steamed in the already blazing morning sun and shuffled their feet impatiently on the red clay courts of the Gymkhana Club, Singh let out a jubilant shout: "The monsoon bird is here! Hail clamator jacobinus, the monsoon is coming!" In the excruciating pre-monsoon temperatures of northern India, when 110-degree heat is just a starting point, there are no sweeter words.
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WORLD
September 1, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
It's a stultifying afternoon outside the Delhi District Court as Arun Yadav slides a sheet of paper into his decades-old Remington and revs up his daily 30-word-a-minute tap dance. Nearby, hundreds of other workers clatter away on manual typewriters amid a sea of broken chairs and wobbly tables as the occasional wildlife thumps on the leaky tin roof above. "Sometimes the monkeys steal the affidavits," Yadav said. "That can be a real nuisance. " The factories that make the machines may be going silent, but India's typewriter culture remains defiantly alive, fighting on bravely against that omnipresent upstart, the computer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | JAMES ENDRST, Hartford Courant
It is cruel but fair to say that Salman Rushdie's career owes much to the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. It was not "The Satanic Verses" but the death sentence imposed by Khomeini that boosted Rushdie's book sales, made the author a living martyr for free expression and--because he was forced into hiding, where he remains--made him a mystery man as well.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a village of beggars, what people want most is the one thing nobody else can give them: self-respect. The soil is rich, yet the 650 villagers are dirt poor because none of them owns any of the lush green farmland that surrounds them. They depend almost entirely on the coins and bowls of wheat flour they receive as alms. It has been this way for at least a century because, the villagers say, they have been born to honor the Hindu god Krishna with song and outstretched hands.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
To most of the 45,000 seemingly normal residents of this sleepy little town on the banks of the River Jam, Anil Sambare is nothing more than a spoilsport. To some, he is something worse. A troublemaker, some say. An idealistic radical, according to others. Some even think him a traitor to his hometown.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it seemed like just another Sunday morning in Mir Bahar Ghat, a teeming and gritty cobblestoned market street in the heart of an urban hell. Flanked by the stench of disease and human waste, laborers and children scrubbed themselves in a poisoned well. A dozen filthy pigs nibbled their way through a steaming heap of yesterday's garbage.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | JURA KONCIUS, WASHINGTON POST
Now that we've learned how to pronounce feng shui and hung mirrors and crystals all over our houses, there's another even more ancient domestic science winging its way from East to West promising harmony and prosperity. Can you say vastu? Dig out your compass and clear the coffee table for two new books out this fall explaining the intricacies of a Hindu system of philosophy based on the belief that we can improve our lives by rearranging the spaces where we live and work.
NEWS
February 29, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a Friday morning, Monica Trikha, a 19-year-old honors student in English, rose from bed, peeked into her closet and did something her tradition-minded mother would never dare do. She pulled out a pair of tight denim pants, slipped them on, and went to class. "I wear jeans because they are comfortable," says the raven-haired teen, who attends Jesus and Mary College in the capital. "Also, I see other girls wearing them, so I do the same."
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lakshmi already had one daughter, so when she gave birth to a second girl, she killed her. For the three days of her second child's short life, Lakshmi admits, she refused to nurse her. To silence the infant's famished cries, the impoverished village woman squeezed the milky sap from an oleander shrub, mixed it with castor oil and forced the poisonous potion down the newborn's throat. The baby bled from the nose and died soon afterward.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now this from India's "Queen of Porn," the first woman author here to use "the F-word," as she calls it, in print: "The way my day and my life is structured, it's all with kids!" "With kids and kids and kids," says Shobha De. "And, you know, their days, their tennis, their pianos, their birthdays, their school schedules, their clothes. . . ." Is this "the Jackie Collins of India," as her critics and even her publisher have dubbed her?
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
India's top religious leaders came together in New Delhi to make a passionate plea to end a growing trend of aborting female fetuses, calling it "coldblooded murder." "Women are forced to abort their female fetus owing to family pressure, and the practice of dowry is responsible for this," said Swami Agnivesh of the Arya Samaj, referring to the widespread South Asian practice of men demanding huge sums of money and gifts from the bride's family during marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001 | Times Wire Reports
Seeking to show that intimate relationships with girls are accepted in India, the attorney for a Berkeley landlord convicted of importing young females for sex and cheap labor filed papers this week claiming a "cultural defense." Attorney Ted Cassman asked a judge "to consider that Lakireddy Bali Reddy is a product of a society" in which "the norms of his society were amenable to conduct which is clearly offensive in the U.S."
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | JURA KONCIUS, WASHINGTON POST
Now that we've learned how to pronounce feng shui and hung mirrors and crystals all over our houses, there's another even more ancient domestic science winging its way from East to West promising harmony and prosperity. Can you say vastu? Dig out your compass and clear the coffee table for two new books out this fall explaining the intricacies of a Hindu system of philosophy based on the belief that we can improve our lives by rearranging the spaces where we live and work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2000 | MARJORIE HERNANDEZ
A festival Saturday at Pierce College will celebrate the 53rd anniversary of India's independence, marking the first year the event will be held in the San Fernando Valley. In previous years, the festival was held in Artesia, the center of the Indian business community. But in the last 19 years, the Valley's Indo-American population has quadrupled to 50,000. Festival organizers chose the site to bring the cultural celebration closer to the growing population. The event, which will run from 11 a.
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | Associated Press
Brass replicas replaced real snakes during a popular Hindu festival in Bombay on Friday, a day after police confiscated 70,000 starving cobras and rock pythons that were to be forced to drink milk. About 50,000 snakes die each year during the Nagpanchami festival, when people offer milk, congealed butter and sweetened rice to starving snakes, according to estimates from the World Wide Fund for Nature-India. Snakes do not drink milk and do not normally eat butter or rice.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2000 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
Two years ago, when Ramaa Bharadvaj turned 40, she had an epiphany. No longer would she conform to traditional notions of how an Indian wife and mother should behave. Nor would she confine herself to age-old ritual and mythological themes when choreographing the classical Indian dance she had performed since the age of 3. "My 40th year was a tornado," recalls Bharadvaj, sporting a cranberry-and-gold chiffon sari and a stick-on bindi, representing the "third eye of wisdom," on her forehead.
NEWS
March 29, 1999 | CHARLOTTE INNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni came to the United States from India 23 years ago, she brought with her the books she read as a child, old Bengali folk tales filled with gods and demons, and fantastic fairy-tale adventures. She's still reading those books, but this time aloud--translating from Bengali as she goes--to her sons, Anand, 7, and Abhay, 4, as well as other kids from her Houston neighborhood who stop by to listen. "They love stories, my children--genetically, I guess!"
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clusters of men, shirtless and barefoot, stand warily on opposite sides of a chalk line that divides a grass field. One of them inches toward the line, clasping his hands in prayer. Then he scurries across, only to be slapped and kicked to the ground by his opponents. The crowd roars its approval. The ancient Indian sport of k abaddi resembles, at first glance, nothing short of mayhem. And it looks all the stranger when played in a college football stadium south of Oakland.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, Don Heckman writes about jazz and world music for Calendar
"The Ramayana" is one of the world's great epic tales. A classic exposition underscoring the vital importance of dharma (righteousness), it is also a formidable tale of kings, queens, heroes, villains and magical creatures, chronicling the adventures of Ram and the ultimate triumph of his good dharma over the forces of evil.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Reuters
When Asha, a frail Delhi slum dweller, had her sixth daughter two years ago, doctors advised her to be sterilized immediately. But the 35-year-old domestic servant would not hear of it. In a country where, as the saying goes, women are blessed to be mothers of a hundred sons, Asha believed it would be sacrilegious for her not to have a son.
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