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July 18, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Khushwant Singh halted his tennis serve in mid-swing and cupped his ear. As his playing companions steamed in the already blazing morning sun and shuffled their feet impatiently on the red clay courts of the Gymkhana Club, Singh let out a jubilant shout: "The monsoon bird is here! Hail clamator jacobinus, the monsoon is coming!" In the excruciating pre-monsoon temperatures of northern India, when 110-degree heat is just a starting point, there are no sweeter words.
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WORLD
September 1, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
It's a stultifying afternoon outside the Delhi District Court as Arun Yadav slides a sheet of paper into his decades-old Remington and revs up his daily 30-word-a-minute tap dance. Nearby, hundreds of other workers clatter away on manual typewriters amid a sea of broken chairs and wobbly tables as the occasional wildlife thumps on the leaky tin roof above. "Sometimes the monkeys steal the affidavits," Yadav said. "That can be a real nuisance. " The factories that make the machines may be going silent, but India's typewriter culture remains defiantly alive, fighting on bravely against that omnipresent upstart, the computer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1989 | JAMES ENDRST, Hartford Courant
It is cruel but fair to say that Salman Rushdie's career owes much to the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. It was not "The Satanic Verses" but the death sentence imposed by Khomeini that boosted Rushdie's book sales, made the author a living martyr for free expression and--because he was forced into hiding, where he remains--made him a mystery man as well.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
India's top religious leaders came together in New Delhi to make a passionate plea to end a growing trend of aborting female fetuses, calling it "coldblooded murder." "Women are forced to abort their female fetus owing to family pressure, and the practice of dowry is responsible for this," said Swami Agnivesh of the Arya Samaj, referring to the widespread South Asian practice of men demanding huge sums of money and gifts from the bride's family during marriage.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
To most of the 45,000 seemingly normal residents of this sleepy little town on the banks of the River Jam, Anil Sambare is nothing more than a spoilsport. To some, he is something worse. A troublemaker, some say. An idealistic radical, according to others. Some even think him a traitor to his hometown.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it seemed like just another Sunday morning in Mir Bahar Ghat, a teeming and gritty cobblestoned market street in the heart of an urban hell. Flanked by the stench of disease and human waste, laborers and children scrubbed themselves in a poisoned well. A dozen filthy pigs nibbled their way through a steaming heap of yesterday's garbage.
NEWS
February 22, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lakshmi already had one daughter, so when she gave birth to a second girl, she killed her. For the three days of her second child's short life, Lakshmi admits, she refused to nurse her. To silence the infant's famished cries, the impoverished village woman squeezed the milky sap from an oleander shrub, mixed it with castor oil and forced the poisonous potion down the newborn's throat. The baby bled from the nose and died soon afterward.
NEWS
April 1, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And now this from India's "Queen of Porn," the first woman author here to use "the F-word," as she calls it, in print: "The way my day and my life is structured, it's all with kids!" "With kids and kids and kids," says Shobha De. "And, you know, their days, their tennis, their pianos, their birthdays, their school schedules, their clothes. . . ." Is this "the Jackie Collins of India," as her critics and even her publisher have dubbed her?
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clusters of men, shirtless and barefoot, stand warily on opposite sides of a chalk line that divides a grass field. One of them inches toward the line, clasping his hands in prayer. Then he scurries across, only to be slapped and kicked to the ground by his opponents. The crowd roars its approval. The ancient Indian sport of k abaddi resembles, at first glance, nothing short of mayhem. And it looks all the stranger when played in a college football stadium south of Oakland.
NEWS
December 5, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
Donna Hughes and her 2-year-old son were driving contentedly down a major New Delhi avenue recently singing one of their favorite nursery rhymes: Bah, bah, black sheep, have you any wool? ... The 27-year-old woman, an aquatics instructor and wife of a Canadian diplomat here, slowed the car as it approached an intersection. Suddenly something burst in the open driver's-seat window and began ripping her hair. She instinctively clutched the steering wheel for protection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2001 | Times Wire Reports
Seeking to show that intimate relationships with girls are accepted in India, the attorney for a Berkeley landlord convicted of importing young females for sex and cheap labor filed papers this week claiming a "cultural defense." Attorney Ted Cassman asked a judge "to consider that Lakireddy Bali Reddy is a product of a society" in which "the norms of his society were amenable to conduct which is clearly offensive in the U.S."
NEWS
August 5, 2000 | Associated Press
Brass replicas replaced real snakes during a popular Hindu festival in Bombay on Friday, a day after police confiscated 70,000 starving cobras and rock pythons that were to be forced to drink milk. About 50,000 snakes die each year during the Nagpanchami festival, when people offer milk, congealed butter and sweetened rice to starving snakes, according to estimates from the World Wide Fund for Nature-India. Snakes do not drink milk and do not normally eat butter or rice.
NEWS
August 27, 1999 | TIMES FASHION WRITERS
India is the inspiration for many of this season's trendy fashions and home accessories, but luckily there's no need to hop a plane to buy them. The latest ethnic aesthetic can be found right here in Southern California in shops on a four-block stretch of Pioneer Boulevard in Artesia unofficially known as Little India. Savvy shoppers will find sumptuous silk saris, glittery bangle bracelets, embroidered pillows and slippers sewn with golden thread--all at affordable prices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an exchange program to promote cultural understanding, a Valley Rotary district is seeking four people to visit India in January. The four participants can be from any professional background, including teaching, business management and law enforcement. For about a month they will live in Madurai, a large city near India's southern tip, said John D. Alexander, chairman of the group study exchange of Rotary District 5260.
TRAVEL
June 27, 1999 | BOB SIPCHEN
Like Egypt and Mesopotamia, India is a cradle of civilization. But unlike the people of those other regions, the author writes, today's Indians remain clearly linked to their ancient traditions: They "still believe in the same religion(s), they still worship the same gods and they still chant the same verses and hymns, which they recited 4,000 years ago. " Travelers to this subcontinent encounter a living museum of a vast slice of humankind, one-seventh of which lives in India.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Backed by upper-caste landlords seeking revenge, a private militia stormed into a village in eastern India, killing 12 people, police said Thursday. Members of the Ranbir Sena militia on Wednesday entered the village of Sindani, 530 miles southeast of New Delhi, and opened fire, said T.P. Sinha, a local police official.
NEWS
July 18, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is July, and the thoughts of Indians have turned to mangoes, their juicy and golden reward after months of torrid heat. The Benazir and the Bhutto are again in season, almost as green as the Pakistani flag. The walnut-sized Angoor Dana (Grape Seed), the blushing Husn-ara (Beauty) and the lime-like Laila are now in markets and people's pantries.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Somehow we found ourselves talking about Ram Dass' funeral. I said the name of the funeral would have to be 'Be Dead Now' (after Ram Dass' best - selling book 'Be Here Now'). Bob Dylan has a line in a song somewhere about he who isn't busy being born is busy dying. There's not that many people who, at 60, are still busy being born. Ram Dass is still being born." --political activist Paul Gorman, co-author with Ram Dass of "How Can I Help?" Social action quiz for the '90s: 1.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A Communist militia shot to death 35 people at close range in a revenge attack on Senari, an eastern Indian village, police said. Residents of the village who were rounded up and shot were believed to have links with a militia connected to the upper classes, officials said. The militia has killed at least 33 Dalits--people from the lowest caste--in the past six weeks.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that the apostle St. Thomas brought Christianity to India almost 2,000 years ago. But among this country's hard-core Hindu revivalists, the faith has never lost its foreign taint. A string of violent attacks--some with the apparent complicity of government officials--on churches and missionaries has sparked a panic among India's 23 million Christians and opened a debate about national identity in a country still tormented by its colonial past.
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