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India Military Aid Sri Lanka

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NEWS
October 18, 1987
Indian troops breached the perimeter of Jaffna city but met heavy resistance and sniper fire from Tamil rebels in fortified bunkers and trees in the Sri Lankan city, an Indian spokesman said. The official said five Indian soldiers were killed and three were wounded while clearing booby traps and bunkers on the eastern fringe of the city, where fighting was continuing.
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NEWS
March 25, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweltering and glum-faced on the shores of China Bay, the last of the Sikh Light Regiment marched single-file ahead of the final contingents of Gurkhas and paratroopers onto a waiting Indian navy troop ship early Saturday, as India ended its longest and most controversial foreign military adventure. The Sri Lankan Navy Band played "Auld Lang Syne," and there were speeches of praise and thanks all around.
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NEWS
May 15, 1988
Most of the Indian peace-keeping troops in Sri Lanka will end their 10-month-old deployment within 45 days, reducing the number of Indian personnel on the island nation to 25,000, an Indian military official said in Madras. The official, who requested anonymity, said Sri Lankan forces will assume security operations in the east, where the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, a rebel group, have in recent weeks staged several attacks. "The phased withdrawal will not mean total withdrawal," he said.
NEWS
August 29, 1989
A general strike called by Sinhalese radicals brought nearly all businesses and transportation to a halt in most of Sri Lanka. Despite government efforts to keep everything open on the first day of the weeklong strike, witnesses said almost all shops, hotels, offices and businesses had closed by evening in Colombo, the capital, and most of southern and central Sri Lanka.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
India on Friday offered to withdraw 1,500 troops a week if the largest Tamil guerrilla group observes a cease-fire, government sources here said. About 45,000 Indian troops are in Sri Lanka to enforce a July, 1987, peace accord aimed at ending ethnic strife in the Indian Ocean republic, where the government is dominated by the Sinhalese majority.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
India staged a token withdrawal of 600 soldiers Saturday and opened negotiations with Sri Lanka on the departure of the rest of its 45,000 troops sent to quell ethnic violence in this island nation. Sri Lankan President Ranasinghe Premadasa, who had demanded the removal of "the last Indian soldier" by the end of July, sought to portray Saturday's hastily arranged withdrawal as a victory for his government.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | Associated Press
Indian peacekeeping troops have begun leaving Sri Lanka, an Indian official said Thursday, nearly 18 months after the soldiers arrived on a mission to disarm Tamil rebels and enforce a cease-fire. "Some Indian troops have already left Sri Lanka during the past two days, and another battalion is scheduled to leave Sunday," said Gurjit Singh, a spokesman for the Indian High Commission.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
India on Friday offered to withdraw 1,500 troops a week if the largest Tamil guerrilla group observes a cease-fire, government sources here said. About 45,000 Indian troops are in Sri Lanka to enforce a July, 1987, peace accord aimed at ending ethnic strife in the Indian Ocean republic, where the government is dominated by the Sinhalese majority.
NEWS
July 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
India staged a token withdrawal of 600 soldiers Saturday and opened negotiations with Sri Lanka on the departure of the rest of its 45,000 troops sent to quell ethnic violence in this island nation. Sri Lankan President Ranasinghe Premadasa, who had demanded the removal of "the last Indian soldier" by the end of July, sought to portray Saturday's hastily arranged withdrawal as a victory for his government.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | Associated Press
Indian peacekeeping troops have begun leaving Sri Lanka, an Indian official said Thursday, nearly 18 months after the soldiers arrived on a mission to disarm Tamil rebels and enforce a cease-fire. "Some Indian troops have already left Sri Lanka during the past two days, and another battalion is scheduled to leave Sunday," said Gurjit Singh, a spokesman for the Indian High Commission.
NEWS
May 15, 1988
Most of the Indian peace-keeping troops in Sri Lanka will end their 10-month-old deployment within 45 days, reducing the number of Indian personnel on the island nation to 25,000, an Indian military official said in Madras. The official, who requested anonymity, said Sri Lankan forces will assume security operations in the east, where the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, a rebel group, have in recent weeks staged several attacks. "The phased withdrawal will not mean total withdrawal," he said.
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