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SPORTS
February 20, 2005 | BOB MIESZERSKI
Both of the stakes races on today's program at Santa Anita are scheduled for about 6 1/2 furlongs on the turf, but both are almost certain to be run on the main track given all the rain that has fallen in the last couple of days. A switch to dirt would be fine with Indian Country in the $75,000 Daytona Handicap, the first of the two stakes; the other is the $125,000 Sensational Star for older California-breds.
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NATIONAL
December 9, 2009 | By Nicholas Riccardi
The Obama administration on Tuesday announced it would pay Native Americans $3.4 billion to settle a class-action lawsuit that claimed the federal government cheated tribes for more than a century of royalties for oil, mineral and other leases. The settlement ends a 13-year legal battle that led to 3,600 filings, millions of pages of discovery documents and 11 separate appellate decisions. It is the largest settlement Native Americans have ever received from the federal government, eclipsing the sum of all previous settlements, according to the plaintiff's lawyers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1993 | From a guest editorial by Dave Baldridge of the National Indian Council on Aging in Indian Country Today, a weekly published on Wednesdays in Rapid City, S.D., and circulated throughout the West. and
"Dedicated to Our Elders and to Our Children" reads the first page of the nicely bound report of the National Indian Summit to Health-Care Reform. The sentiment is a noble one, and it plays well to the American public's popular perception that all Indian tribes hold elders in the highest esteem.
SPORTS
May 12, 2005 | BOB MIESZERSKI
In three starts at Santa Anita and Turf Paradise, Indian Country is without a victory. The 4-year-old son of Indian Charlie has been third in each of his races at those two tracks. The story is different at Hollywood Park. Indian Country has won three of four in Inglewood and will try for another victory in today's seventh race, a $55,000 optional claimer at seven furlongs. After finishing third in his career debut here on May 15, 2004, Indian Country has won three in a row over the track.
BOOKS
June 21, 1987 | Dick Roraback, Roraback is a Times staff writer
"Another novel about Viet vets?" asks a colleague, thumbing through a review copy of Philip Caputo's "Indian Country." "Haven't we had enough books on war?" A question answered with a question: "Have we had enough books on love?" Love and war, the central themes of literature, then, now, forever: Homer to Cartland, Beowulf to Buscaglia. All's fair. War and love: opposed extensions of the human condition, as are the dual meanings of the titular "Indian Country."
SPORTS
May 12, 2005 | BOB MIESZERSKI
In three starts at Santa Anita and Turf Paradise, Indian Country is without a victory. The 4-year-old son of Indian Charlie has been third in each of his races at those two tracks. The story is different at Hollywood Park. Indian Country has won three of four in Inglewood and will try for another victory in today's seventh race, a $55,000 optional claimer at seven furlongs. After finishing third in his career debut here on May 15, 2004, Indian Country has won three in a row over the track.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | STEVE RAYMER, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
American soldiers used to call this "Indian Country." On maps, the town of Dinh Quan was part of War Zone D, a lethal communist stronghold of scruffy jungle and stately rubber plantations along National Highway 20, about 80 miles northeast of Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon. A quarter-century later, a group of middle-age American evangelical Christians--most of them combat veterans of the Vietnam War--are spending their vacations in Dinh Quan. During the last three years, about 200 veterans and their families have flown halfway around the world at their own expense to help build and staff medical and dental clinics here and at the nearby village of Phu Ngoc.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's barely autumn, but morning dawned at 8 below zero and the pockets on the discarded pool table outside the village office are stuffed with snow. The moose that Ernest Erick hung out back is frozen stiff. The sled dogs stand silent, a still life of frosty fur and reproachful blue eyes, except for the breath clouding around their heads.
NEWS
February 10, 1985 | MARY BETH FRANKLIN, United Press International
An American Indian group is promoting the idea, "Give it back to the Indians," by urging people to donate land in exchange for hefty tax breaks. The American Indian Heritage Foundation, a nonprofit charitable group, has placed ads in the Washington Post and aired public service announcements on Washington-area radio stations since last November in its campaign for land donations. "Give it back to the Indians . . . and get a good tax break too," proclaims the ads in the Post.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | SANDY JOHNSON, Associated Press
On the wall is a portrait of a raven-haired warrior, his profile proud and handsome, clad in the feathers, bones and colored beads of traditional Indian dress. Sitting on the sofa is a U.S. congressman in a gray Western-cut suit, with close-cropped hair graying at the temples. The man in the portrait is the man on the sofa: Ben Nighthorse Campbell, a Northern Cheyenne and a U.S. representative from Colorado.
SPORTS
February 20, 2005 | BOB MIESZERSKI
Both of the stakes races on today's program at Santa Anita are scheduled for about 6 1/2 furlongs on the turf, but both are almost certain to be run on the main track given all the rain that has fallen in the last couple of days. A switch to dirt would be fine with Indian Country in the $75,000 Daytona Handicap, the first of the two stakes; the other is the $125,000 Sensational Star for older California-breds.
BOOKS
July 18, 2004 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
Writing of his travels in the Southwest in 1924, D.H. Lawrence counted 800 cars in a parking lot on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona, where some 3,000 tourists had gathered to see a performance of the famous Snake Dance. Most of them managed to convince themselves that they were witnessing something authentic and sacred. For Lawrence, however, the spectacle was something wholly debased. "And what had we come to see, all of us? Men with snakes in their mouths, like a circus?"
NATIONAL
April 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
A federal arrest warrant has been issued for a second former American Indian Movement security guard in the 1970s slaying of an AIM activist involved in the 1973 Wounded Knee standoff with federal agents, officials said Thursday. Authorities said they were looking for John Graham, also known as John Boy Patton, originally from Canada's Yukon.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2002 | From Associated Press
Neal A. McCaleb, whose 17 months as the Bush administration's top official for Indian programs have been marred by controversy concerning management of Indian trust funds, has given notice he will retire at the end of the year. "It is with great reluctance, deep regret and a sense of personal loss that I accept the retirement of Neal McCaleb," Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton said in a statement.
NEWS
December 18, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Native History of Early America by Daniel Richter Harvard University Press $26, 320 pages Two hundred years after the Pilgrims on the Mayflower landed at Plymouth on Dec. 22, 1620, Daniel Webster delivered a bicentennial address praising their influence on the American Revolution and what would become the United States. "The world has seen nothing like this," Webster said.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's barely autumn, but morning dawned at 8 below zero and the pockets on the discarded pool table outside the village office are stuffed with snow. The moose that Ernest Erick hung out back is frozen stiff. The sled dogs stand silent, a still life of frosty fur and reproachful blue eyes, except for the breath clouding around their heads.
NATIONAL
April 4, 2003 | From Associated Press
A federal arrest warrant has been issued for a second former American Indian Movement security guard in the 1970s slaying of an AIM activist involved in the 1973 Wounded Knee standoff with federal agents, officials said Thursday. Authorities said they were looking for John Graham, also known as John Boy Patton, originally from Canada's Yukon.
NEWS
April 26, 1985 | United Press International
An elderly Navajo woman honored today by President Reagan for her volunteer work was reprimanded by a White House aide after the woman pleaded publicly with the President to keep economic benefits such as Social Security at their present level, a Navajo spokesman said. The White House aide, Ann Kelly, privately rebuked the woman, saying, "My head's on the block now. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1994 | From a commentary by Tim Giago, editor of Indian Country Today, a daily published in South Dakota and distributed widely in the West. and
Loss of respect for self and others is the real downfall for today's tribal societies. At a recent junior high school graduation I reminded the children about one Lakota virtue that was fast disappearing: respect. I told them we were losing respect for our elders, for each other and for the property of others. And yet, these children must grow up and compete in the real world of today. They are not like the children in the textbooks.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | STEVE RAYMER, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
American soldiers used to call this "Indian Country." On maps, the town of Dinh Quan was part of War Zone D, a lethal communist stronghold of scruffy jungle and stately rubber plantations along National Highway 20, about 80 miles northeast of Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon. A quarter-century later, a group of middle-age American evangelical Christians--most of them combat veterans of the Vietnam War--are spending their vacations in Dinh Quan. During the last three years, about 200 veterans and their families have flown halfway around the world at their own expense to help build and staff medical and dental clinics here and at the nearby village of Phu Ngoc.
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