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BUSINESS
August 13, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Orange County man who claimed he wanted to revive production of America's first motorcycle has been convicted of bilking investors in his Indian Motocycle scheme out of $830,000. A U.S. District Court jury deliberated for less than three hours Monday before finding Philip S. Zanghi II guilty of 12 counts of securities fraud, three counts of tax evasion and six counts of money laundering. Judge Frank Freedman scheduled sentencing for Zanghi, 51, of Mission Viejo, for Dec. 9.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Investors in Indian Motorcycle Corp. spent more than $145 million to find out there wasn't much demand for its product. The Gilroy, Calif., company that tried to revive the nation's oldest and once most popular motorcycle brand said Monday that it had halted production late last week and fired 380 employees. The move came after a decision by the main investor, Audax Group in Boston, to pull out after pumping more than $45 million into Indian Motorcycle over the last two years.
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NEWS
June 24, 1999 | Two-Wheel Ride DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The beloved Indian motorcycle--once the best-selling brand in the United States--is back. Sort of. This month, Indian Motorcycle Co.--formed by a partnership of U.S. and Canadian firms--began shipping the first official Indian bikes to be manufactured since 1953, when the original company folded.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | Two-Wheel Ride DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The beloved Indian motorcycle--once the best-selling brand in the United States--is back. Sort of. This month, Indian Motorcycle Co.--formed by a partnership of U.S. and Canadian firms--began shipping the first official Indian bikes to be manufactured since 1953, when the original company folded.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2003 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Investors in Indian Motorcycle Corp. spent more than $145 million to find out there wasn't much demand for its product. The Gilroy, Calif., company that tried to revive the nation's oldest and once most popular motorcycle brand said Monday that it had halted production late last week and fired 380 employees. The move came after a decision by the main investor, Audax Group in Boston, to pull out after pumping more than $45 million into Indian Motorcycle over the last two years.
BUSINESS
December 8, 1998 | Reuters
A federal judge in Denver said a Canadian and California partnership and not one from Colorado will be granted the right to produce motorcycles bearing the coveted "Indian" brand name. Judge Zita Weinshienk's written decision came 10 days after bike enthusiasts and potential Indian brand distributors attended a court hearing trying to persuade her that the Colorado company, Eller Industries, would be a better choice. But Weinshienk ruled in favor of Imcoa Licensing Co.
AUTOS
January 30, 2002
Indian Motorcycle Corp. says it will complete its journey back into the marketplace this year with the introduction of the 2002 Chief, outfitted with the first Indian-designed engine in 45 years. The new 100-cubic-inch V-twin was engineered at Indian's headquarters in Gilroy, Calif.--near Monterey--and is being built by a custom-engine manufacturing contractor in Livonia, Mich.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Lutz, the flamboyant former Chrysler Corp. executive who helped spark the auto maker's 1990s renaissance, hopes to use his management prowess to rescue the maker of Diehard batteries. Exide Corp., the world's leading manufacturer of lead-acid batteries for auto and industrial uses, said Monday that Lutz will become chairman, president and chief executive officer Dec. 1. Lutz, 66, is taking over an embattled company that has been under fire for several months.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1986 | JEFF ROWE, Jeff Rowe is a free-lance writer
Mike Ittner knelt in admiration at the side of the fully restored Indian Chief, examining the classic motorcycle's hand-painted logo, V-twin cylinders and tractor-style seat. Ittner, a Tucson, Ariz., cabinetmaker, was in Southern California on business. But he had arranged to make a pilgrimage to Starklite Cycle in Fullerton--one of only two companies in the nation that specialize in restoring Indian motorcycles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2003 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
On the campaign trail, Arnold Schwarzenegger isn't telling voters what he'll do about taxes. But in at least one speech, he let slip that he stays trim by riding a Lifecycle exercise machine in the morning. He has no stated plans for dealing with traffic congestion or auto pollution, but last week the gubernatorial candidate declared, not for the first time, that he likes Hummers.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An Orange County man who claimed he wanted to revive production of America's first motorcycle has been convicted of bilking investors in his Indian Motocycle scheme out of $830,000. A U.S. District Court jury deliberated for less than three hours Monday before finding Philip S. Zanghi II guilty of 12 counts of securities fraud, three counts of tax evasion and six counts of money laundering. Judge Frank Freedman scheduled sentencing for Zanghi, 51, of Mission Viejo, for Dec. 9.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1999 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1953, the Indian Motorcycle Co. rolled out its last gleaming Blackhawk Chief. And for the next four decades, America had but one serious motorcycle maker: Harley-Davidson Inc. Italy boasted a handful of manufacturers during many of those years. So did England--and England is an island. The even smaller island nation of Japan had several bike builders that were turning out chain-driven road rockets by the freighter load. For bikers in this country--a nation with 3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2006 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
When surfer and starving artist John Severson showed his work at a Laguna Beach gallery in 1955, his boldly colored abstract paintings of longboarders and the California coast didn't exactly set the art world on fire. Severson left as hungry as when he arrived, selling exactly one piece for a measly $35. Half a century later, he returned to Laguna for two shows at the Surf Gallery on Coast Highway. This time, hundreds turned out for the opening receptions. Sushi and wine were served.
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