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Indian Rights

NEWS
September 1, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indian tribes that operate casinos angrily objected Tuesday to Gov. Gray Davis' proposed compact to cap gambling expansion, but tentatively agreed to a related deal that would allow them to operate Nevada-style games. The opening day of talks left in question whether Davis can resolve the issue before the tribes submit petitions to qualify a ballot measure that could set up a new gambling initiative war next year.
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NEWS
May 8, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Smithsonian Institution announced Friday that it will return the brain of Ishi, California's most famous Native American, but not to the Butte County tribes who have campaigned to reunite his remains and rebury them in his homeland in Tehama County. The museum says it will instead give the brain to Native Americans descended from the Yana, the larger tribe to which Ishi's people, the Yahi, belonged.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | Associated Press
In a victory for Washington tribes, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday affirmed their right to harvest shellfish on private beaches. The decision stunned private property owners. The court rejected without comment an appeal of a lower-court ruling that upheld the tribes' shellfish rights. State officials, shellfish growers and private property owners had challenged the decision, contending that Indians' 19th-century treaties give them no legal claim to shellfish on private property.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of masked Zapatista rebels slipped out of their jungle hide-outs in the southern state of Chiapas and took up strategic positions Sunday in cities and towns across Mexico. Their mission: to carry out an unofficial referendum at makeshift voting tables in large cities, town squares and village markets, asking ordinary Mexicans to declare their support for Indian rights--and for resuming long-stalled peace negotiations on the Chiapas conflict.
NEWS
February 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Sioux actor and activist Russell Means went on trial before the Navajo Supreme Court in a case that tests the legitimacy of the American Indian justice system. The court convened at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., to hear an assault case against Means, a longtime leader of the American Indian Movement. Means is accused of beating his father-in-law in 1997 in Arizona's Navajo Nation, but as an Oglala Sioux, he insists he cannot be prosecuted by another tribe.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Nisga'a Indian tribe signed a treaty that gives members self-government and land rights in their rugged mountain homeland in British Columbia province. It was a historic day not only for the 5,500 Nisga'a but for all Indians in British Columbia. None of the other 50 Indian communities has obtained a treaty in this century, and the settlement is expected to serve as a loose model for other deals.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dimly lit UC Berkeley basement, a trove of 9,000 human skeletons has sparked a battle between two professors that is so bitter it has soured the campus' relations with California Indians and raised questions about its compliance with federal law. "I haven't seen this level of viciousness before, and you should remember that I was working in the Clinton White House," said Jay Stowsky, UC's director of research and policy.
OPINION
April 26, 1998 | Tom Wolf, Tom Wolf, who teaches ecology at Colorado College, is the author of "The Ice Crusades: Reflections on Cold War and Cold Sport," to be published this year
Most of what passes for public virtue in water politics is private vice. Nowhere is this more true than in headwaters states like Colorado. The problem with water is not so much scarcity as fraud, subsidy and misallocation. The major contemporary battlefield over such issues is southern Colorado, home of the last of the great pork-barrel boondoggles, the Animas-La Plata Project (ALP). This is a dam, first proposed in 1904 and authorized (but not fully funded) in 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1998 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under overcast skies, a large yellow backhoe peeled away chunks of gray asphalt early Monday in a downtown Los Angeles parking lot, beginning one of the most politically sensitive portions of the multimillion-dollar effort to build a new cathedral for the nation's largest Roman Catholic archdiocese. Archeological testing began to determine what, if any, "significant cultural resources," including human remains or artifacts, may be resting in the soil of the 5.
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