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NEWS
July 11, 2000 | JACQUELINE NEWMYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four months and 3,800 miles after they began their trek in Los Angeles to draw attention to Native American social problems, 17 weary walkers and hundreds of friends, family members and other supporters ended it on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at dawn Monday. The participants were seeking to raise awareness about the twin scourges of substance abuse and domestic violence they say must be addressed in Native American communities.
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NEWS
June 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
American Indians won a rare victory in the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday as the justices allowed the Quechan tribe to pursue its claim to about 25.6 billion gallons of Colorado River water each year. Arizona and California had asked the high court to block the Quechan water claim, saying that the tribe gave up any rights to that water in 1983.
NEWS
June 10, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court on Friday rejected the environmental assessment that allowed the Makah Indian tribe to hunt gray whales off the coast of Washington, ruling that the government's review was "slanted" in favor of allowing the controversial hunt. The 2-to-1 ruling from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals most likely ends the Makah tribe's attempts to land a gray whale during the spring migration off the Pacific Coast, which now is winding down.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2000 | Reuters
A Colombian high court in Bogota revoked an injunction, granted by a lower tribunal six weeks ago, that banned Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum Corp. from drilling for oil in a northeast region claimed as ancestral lands by the semi-nomadic U'wa Indians, a lawyer said.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II on Friday appointed a bishop widely hailed as a conciliator to head the Roman Catholic diocese in central Chiapas state, where his predecessor's perceived support for the leftist Zapatista rebels generated frequent controversies.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has given lawyers for the Interior Department and U.S. Treasury and attorneys representing thousands of Native Americans until Nov. 1 to show that they are close to reaching agreement on overhauling the government's long-troubled Indian trust fund system. U.S. District Judge Royce C.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Wednesday took up an unusual ballot restriction in Hawaii that limits voting for a state land trust to only the descendants of aboriginal Hawaiians, but the outcome may have wide impact on the rights of Native Americans and Alaskans--as well as on the national debate over affirmative action. In recent years, the court's conservative majority has ruled that official "racial classifications" are unconstitutional.
SPORTS
September 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
As dark and dreary as the clouds were overhead Sunday, they weren't as ugly as the Orioles' pitching performance. Cleveland received five walks during a seven-run fifth inning, and Jim Thome hit a home run and scored four runs as the Indians defeated the Orioles, 15-7. The start of the game was delayed one hour, 29 minutes by rain. There was also a 17-minute rain delay in the second inning, and dark clouds hovered over the stadium for much of the day.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indian tribes that operate casinos angrily objected Tuesday to Gov. Gray Davis' proposed compact to cap gambling expansion, but tentatively agreed to a related deal that would allow them to operate Nevada-style games. The opening day of talks left in question whether Davis can resolve the issue before the tribes submit petitions to qualify a ballot measure that could set up a new gambling initiative war next year.
NEWS
May 8, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Smithsonian Institution announced Friday that it will return the brain of Ishi, California's most famous Native American, but not to the Butte County tribes who have campaigned to reunite his remains and rebury them in his homeland in Tehama County. The museum says it will instead give the brain to Native Americans descended from the Yana, the larger tribe to which Ishi's people, the Yahi, belonged.
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