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December 11, 2000 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On June 22, Indiana officials mailed an odd postcard to 202,268 registered voters. One side featured a picture of a man and woman who appeared to have no mouths, and the query, "Will you have a say?" The other side was downright existential, asking voters in a roundabout way the following: Who aren't you? Where don't you live? The intent was to clear up confusion created by Indiana's version of the motor-voter law.
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NEWS
December 11, 2000 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On June 22, Indiana officials mailed an odd postcard to 202,268 registered voters. One side featured a picture of a man and woman who appeared to have no mouths, and the query, "Will you have a say?" The other side was downright existential, asking voters in a roundabout way the following: Who aren't you? Where don't you live? The intent was to clear up confusion created by Indiana's version of the motor-voter law.
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NEWS
December 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Sen. Dan Coats (R-Ind.), who advanced to the Senate when former boss Dan Quayle became vice president, sidestepped what could have been a bruising political battle when he announced Monday he won't seek reelection in 1998. "I want to leave when I am young enough to contribute somewhere else--young enough to resume a career outside government," the 53-year-old lawyer said. Gov.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
North Carolina Democrats nominated a millionaire lawyer Tuesday to challenge Republican Sen. Lauch Faircloth, while two Indiana Republicans battled it out for the right to face former Gov. Evan Bayh for the state's open Senate seat. Faircloth, seeking a second term, was easily renominated over two political unknowns, grabbing four of every five votes cast. John Edwards, 44, making his first bid for public office, won the Democratic primary with 50%, more than enough to avoid a runoff.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | United Press International
Vice President-elect Dan Quayle met Monday with Indiana Gov. Robert D. Orr to discuss candidates for his Senate seat and later boosted his wife, Marilyn, for the job. "Mrs. Quayle would make an outstanding United States senator," Quayle said at an impromptu news conference outside the Hart Senate Office Building. But the junior senator from Indiana, elected vice president last Tuesday, stressed that the decision would be left to Orr, who will make the appointment before he leaves office Jan. 9.
NEWS
November 9, 1988
Vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle's home state gave its 12 electoral votes to his running mate, George Bush by a solid 61%-39% margin. Evan Bayh, 32, heir to a liberal Democratic family but himself a moderate, will become Indiana's first Democratic governor in 20 years after winning 52% of the vote. He will be the youngest governor in the nation. His victory is a measure of family revenge against Quayle, who gained his Senate seat in 1980 by defeating Birch Bayh, Evan Bayh's father.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Democrat Jill Long scored a narrow victory Tuesday over Republican Dan Heath in a special election for the House seat that launched the political career of Vice President Dan Quayle. Long received 65,160 votes, or 51%, to 63,388 votes, or 49%, for Heath. She will be the first Democrat to represent northeast Indiana's 4th Congressional District since Quayle won the 1976 congressional election.
NEWS
January 15, 1989
The Democratic loser in November's 4th District congressional race and a Republican mayoral aide were nominated in Ft. Wayne, Ind., to run in a special election in March to succeed the man filling Vice President-elect Dan Quayle's Senate seat. Republicans took seven ballots to nominate Ft. Wayne public safety director Dan Heath for his party's nomination. Heath, who also serves as aide to Mayor Paul Helmke, defeated eight candidates in voting by GOP precinct committee leaders.
NEWS
March 15, 1988 | Associated Press
A Shelby County court Monday ruled that Secretary of State Evan Bayh met the constitutional five-year residency requirement to be governor. Circuit Judge Charles D. O'Connor concluded that the Democratic candidate did not lose his Indiana residency, as Republicans had argued, when he worked as an attorney in Washington in 1983 and 1984. O'Connor found that Bayh had always intended to return to his home state and never formally established residence elsewhere.
NEWS
May 6, 1987
Gary, Ind., Mayor Richard Hatcher, one of the first black mayors of a large American city, was defeated in his battle for nomination to a sixth term by former supporter Thomas V. Barnes. With 96% of the vote counted in the Democratic mayoral race, Barnes had 57% and Hatcher had 43%. Hatcher has been mayor since 1967, when he and Carl Stokes of Cleveland became the nation's first black mayors of major cities.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | DEXTER FILKINS and PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Try to tell folks in this graying industrial city about Robert K. Dornan and Loretta Sanchez, and they'll tell you they've heard it all before. A super-close congressional election. The winner heading to Washington unsure of final victory. The loser crying foul. "I don't think about it much anymore," said Rick McIntyre, a youthful-looking judge in a town just north of here. "But that was one of the nastiest fights I was ever caught up in."
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | DEXTER FILKINS and PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Try to tell folks in this graying industrial city about Robert K. Dornan and Loretta Sanchez, and they will tell you they have heard it all before. A super-close congressional election. The winner heading to Washington unsure of final victory. The loser crying foul. "I don't think about it much anymore," said Rick McIntyre, a youthful-looking judge in a town just north of here. "But that was one of the nastiest fights I was ever caught up in."
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Sen. Dan Coats (R-Ind.), who advanced to the Senate when former boss Dan Quayle became vice president, sidestepped what could have been a bruising political battle when he announced Monday he won't seek reelection in 1998. "I want to leave when I am young enough to contribute somewhere else--young enough to resume a career outside government," the 53-year-old lawyer said. Gov.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television stations in Indiana and Kentucky, reluctantly following advice from the Federal Communications Commission, on Monday began broadcasting commercials for a congressional candidate that showed photos of dead fetuses. The ads are for Michael E. Bailey, a foe of abortion who is seeking the Republican Party nomination on May 5 for the seat now held by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.).
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Democrat Jill Long scored a narrow victory Tuesday over Republican Dan Heath in a special election for the House seat that launched the political career of Vice President Dan Quayle. Long received 65,160 votes, or 51%, to 63,388 votes, or 49%, for Heath. She will be the first Democrat to represent northeast Indiana's 4th Congressional District since Quayle won the 1976 congressional election.
NEWS
January 15, 1989
The Democratic loser in November's 4th District congressional race and a Republican mayoral aide were nominated in Ft. Wayne, Ind., to run in a special election in March to succeed the man filling Vice President-elect Dan Quayle's Senate seat. Republicans took seven ballots to nominate Ft. Wayne public safety director Dan Heath for his party's nomination. Heath, who also serves as aide to Mayor Paul Helmke, defeated eight candidates in voting by GOP precinct committee leaders.
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television stations in Indiana and Kentucky, reluctantly following advice from the Federal Communications Commission, on Monday began broadcasting commercials for a congressional candidate that showed photos of dead fetuses. The ads are for Michael E. Bailey, a foe of abortion who is seeking the Republican Party nomination on May 5 for the seat now held by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton (D-Ind.).
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
North Carolina Democrats nominated a millionaire lawyer Tuesday to challenge Republican Sen. Lauch Faircloth, while two Indiana Republicans battled it out for the right to face former Gov. Evan Bayh for the state's open Senate seat. Faircloth, seeking a second term, was easily renominated over two political unknowns, grabbing four of every five votes cast. John Edwards, 44, making his first bid for public office, won the Democratic primary with 50%, more than enough to avoid a runoff.
NEWS
November 15, 1988 | United Press International
Vice President-elect Dan Quayle met Monday with Indiana Gov. Robert D. Orr to discuss candidates for his Senate seat and later boosted his wife, Marilyn, for the job. "Mrs. Quayle would make an outstanding United States senator," Quayle said at an impromptu news conference outside the Hart Senate Office Building. But the junior senator from Indiana, elected vice president last Tuesday, stressed that the decision would be left to Orr, who will make the appointment before he leaves office Jan. 9.
NEWS
November 9, 1988
Vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle's home state gave its 12 electoral votes to his running mate, George Bush by a solid 61%-39% margin. Evan Bayh, 32, heir to a liberal Democratic family but himself a moderate, will become Indiana's first Democratic governor in 20 years after winning 52% of the vote. He will be the youngest governor in the nation. His victory is a measure of family revenge against Quayle, who gained his Senate seat in 1980 by defeating Birch Bayh, Evan Bayh's father.
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