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NEWS
March 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of Indians, students and foreign leftists opened a National Indigenous Congress in Nurio, a village in Michoacan state, calling for passage of an Indian rights bill they believe would bring respect to those whose ancestors once ruled what is now Mexico. Indians are united in their belief that the accord would help them preserve their cultures, languages and land.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Means, who gained international notoriety as one of the leaders of the 71-day armed occupation of Wounded Knee in South Dakota in 1973 and continued to be an outspoken champion of American Indian rights after launching a career as an actor in films and television in the 1990s, has died. He was 72. Means died Monday at his home in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Reservation, said Glenn Morris, his legal representative. Diagnosed with esophageal cancer in July 2011 and told that it had spread too far for surgery, Means refused to undergo heavy doses of radiation and chemotherapy.
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NEWS
July 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Zapatista sympathizers blocked main highways in the southern state of Chiapas, protesting Mexico's approval of a watered-down Indian rights bill. The demonstrators also urged President Vicente Fox to free nine Zapatista sympathizers from jails, disarm paramilitary groups and stop "political repression." They blocked highways for hours across the state, bringing traffic to a halt.
WORLD
January 30, 2008 | Claudia Lagos and Patrick J. McDonnell, Special to The Times
The Chilean government defended its decision Tuesday to back a church-brokered agreement that ended a months-long hunger strike by a jailed Indian-rights activist. A top official in the office of President Michelle Bachelet said Patricia Troncoso was not granted a pardon and would serve out her 10-year sentence -- albeit in a work camp and not in a prison, and with weekend leaves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1986
Bravo for your article (May 27) on the Quinault Indian Nation's legal battles to regain their rights. Treatment of many American Indians, along with our history of slavery, is a blot on an otherwise noble struggle in America toward a life of freedom, democracy, and fairness for those fortunate enough to live here. That past injustices are being righted through dedicated lawyers in U.S. courts is a tribute to one of the most admirable uses of this country's judicial system. BETTY BAUM NOVICOFF Brea
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Zapatista rebel leader Subcommander Marcos pledged to fight for constitutional recognition of Indian rights and culture, and called for his followers to fill Mexico City's streets and plazas in support. Speaking in a suburb of the capital, Marcos seemed to suggest that he and several Zapatista leaders would stay in Mexico City--instead of returning to Chiapas state--until the constitution is changed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Means, who gained international notoriety as one of the leaders of the 71-day armed occupation of Wounded Knee in South Dakota in 1973 and continued to be an outspoken champion of American Indian rights after launching a career as an actor in films and television in the 1990s, has died. He was 72. Means died Monday at his home in Porcupine, S.D., on the Pine Ridge Reservation, said Glenn Morris, his legal representative. Diagnosed with esophageal cancer in July 2011 and told that it had spread too far for surgery, Means refused to undergo heavy doses of radiation and chemotherapy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
John Trudell had no designs on being a poet or performer until personal tragedy and a chance encounter with veteran guitarist Jesse Ed Davis brought him into the rock world. Trudell, who appears with Davis and the Grafitti Band at Club Lingerie on Monday, was an Indian rights activist who participated in the occupation of Alcatraz Island in 1969.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1986 | From Reuters
Austrian Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal launched an appeal Monday for the rights of Indians around the world, particularly those in Central and South America, saying that some are threatened with genocide. Wiesenthal told a news conference that he plans a hearing in Oslo later this year on the oppression of Indians and their rights.
SPORTS
September 6, 1999 | From Associated Press
As dark and dreary as the clouds were overhead Sunday, they weren't as ugly as the Orioles' pitching performance. Cleveland received five walks during a seven-run fifth inning, and Jim Thome hit a home run and scored four runs as the Indians defeated the Orioles, 15-7. The start of the game was delayed one hour, 29 minutes by rain. There was also a 17-minute rain delay in the second inning, and dark clouds hovered over the stadium for much of the day.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2007 | Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writer
For more than 15 years, clean-cut, square-jawed Tom Heffelfinger was the embodiment of a tough Republican prosecutor. Named U.S. attorney for Minnesota in 1991, he won a series of high-profile white-collar crime and gun and explosives cases. By the time Heffelfinger resigned last year, his office had collected a string of awards and commendations from the Justice Department. So it came as a surprise -- and something of a mystery -- when he turned up on a list of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2005 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
In a significant case for Native Americans, a federal court in San Francisco ruled Tuesday that tribes cannot stop California courts from taking Indian children from their parents. The opinion in Doe vs. Mann by a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals is an attempt by the federal courts to determine how much control tribes retain over foster care and other child welfare issues.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2002
"Jupiter started at Windows on the World in 1995. He loved being up so high. When I visited New York in 1991, he took me up top to the observation deck and he said, 'Look! We're so far up you can see the airplanes flying below us.' Jupiter told me, 'The next highest place is probably the moon.' I was watching TV and I saw the entire thing. I thought it was a Hollywood blockbuster until I noticed the words, 'Breaking News.' I thought, 'Oh, my God, that's where my brother is.'
WORLD
September 7, 2002 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court upheld Mexico's year-old Indian rights law Friday, rejecting a challenge by Zapatista rebel supporters and 319 indigenous municipalities who claimed that they were not consulted about amendments limiting Indian self-rule. Indigenous leaders said the ruling could trigger new violence in southern Mexico, where Zapatista rebels staged an armed uprising in 1994.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Zapatista sympathizers blocked main highways in the southern state of Chiapas, protesting Mexico's approval of a watered-down Indian rights bill. The demonstrators also urged President Vicente Fox to free nine Zapatista sympathizers from jails, disarm paramilitary groups and stop "political repression." They blocked highways for hours across the state, bringing traffic to a halt.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | From Reuters
Mexico ratified landmark constitutional reforms Thursday to strengthen Indian rights, but indigenous communities that had inspired the bill dismissed it as useless in saving the peace process in Chiapas state. State legislatures in Michoacan and Nayarit ratified the set of amendments known as the indigenous rights law, bringing the number of states approving it to 17--more than the majority required among Mexico's 31 states to change the Constitution.
OPINION
April 26, 1998 | Tom Wolf, Tom Wolf, who teaches ecology at Colorado College, is the author of "The Ice Crusades: Reflections on Cold War and Cold Sport," to be published this year
Most of what passes for public virtue in water politics is private vice. Nowhere is this more true than in headwaters states like Colorado. The problem with water is not so much scarcity as fraud, subsidy and misallocation. The major contemporary battlefield over such issues is southern Colorado, home of the last of the great pork-barrel boondoggles, the Animas-La Plata Project (ALP). This is a dam, first proposed in 1904 and authorized (but not fully funded) in 1968.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Southern Mexican rebels attending talks to end the 2-year-old Zapatista rebellion announced that they had signed agreements protecting the rights of Indians. The agreements, confirmed by a government spokesman, include measures to strengthen indigenous political representation, increase economic control and provide for official recognition of indigenous languages and bilingual education. The agreements represented only the first of a number of accords needed to end hostilities.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masked Zapatista rebels took the floor of Mexico's Congress on Wednesday to argue for an Indian rights bill, a historic appearance that raised hopes for an end to their seven-year conflict with the government. Two dozen Zapatistas, unarmed and wearing their trademark ski masks, filed past congressional deputies and took seats in two rows directly in front of the speaker's lectern.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ski-masked leaders of Mexico's Zapatista guerrillas met Monday with congressional mediators in the first serious attempt in nearly five years to address the demands that spurred the rebels' 1994 uprising in the southern state of Chiapas. Subcommander Marcos and 23 fellow commanders of the Zapatista National Liberation Army huddled behind closed doors with federal legislators in a university building in the Mexican capital to begin lobbying for Indian rights legislation.
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