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WORLD
August 1, 2002 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pope John Paul II proclaimed Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin the Roman Catholic Church's first indigenous American saint Wednesday and, in a colorful Mass blending Aztec and European traditions, challenged Mexico to end the racism and neglect that mire its Indian minority in poverty.
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WORLD
June 26, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
It's 5 o'clock on a Tuesday afternoon and James, Moses and Santosh are into their third (or is it fourth?) pitcher of Kingfisher beer at the Down Town pub in Bangalore, enjoying last call of the "gulp one, get one free" happy hour, which actually runs for 7 1/2 hours, but who's counting? The twentysomething students and part-time IT workers won't give their last names because, they explain, if their parents knew they were drinking, they'd be in big trouble. "It's a break from work pressure," says James, 21. "Everyone drinks in our college, but our parents still think drinking is a terrible habit."
WORLD
March 15, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of Indians blocked highways with burning tires and rubble to protest U.S. free trade talks as a second day of demonstrations began to hurt the Andean country's economy. Protesters scuffled with police sent to contain protests in eight central highland provinces, where roadblocks halted agricultural shipments.
OPINION
October 3, 2002
Re "State Sues Tribe Over Reporting of Gifts," Sept. 27: I have been an ardent champion of tribal autonomy in the U.S. But I find certain inconsistencies when tribes try to overreach in justifying their "sovereignty." In the case of not acknowledging their obligation to report election contributions to the Fair Political Practices Commission, I contend that they are indeed asserting sovereignty and therefore should be denied the option to contribute, since they are tantamount to a foreign country.
SPORTS
March 24, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
The Dodgers defeated the Indians, 5-4, on Saturday when they scored three times in the seventh inning -- two on a triple by Luis Cruz-- and yet my favorite part of the game easily came in the first. It included a leadoff bunt single, a steal of second base and an advance to third on the catcher's throwing error, and run-scoring groundout to short. Any guesses? Yep, Dee Gordon struck again. Dropped a little bunt down the third-base line and then created a run almost entirely by himself.
WORLD
May 30, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 22 Indians were killed in Ecuador's Amazon jungle in a clash with a neighboring Indian community, officials said. Tagaeri Indians living in the jungle, about 94 miles southeast of Quito, were killed by members of another Indian group, apparently in a revenge attack involving a previous slaying, an indigenous leader said. The small Tagaeri group is part of the Huaorani ethnic group but has clashed with fellow members who have entered its territory.
SPORTS
September 12, 1987
Two weeks ago, the NBC game of the week featured the Dodger-Phillies contest. Last week, it was the Angels and the Orioles. Maybe this week it will be the Indians and the White Sox. Haven't the sports people at NBC heard of Toronto, or Minnesota, or Detroit, or San Francisco or St. Louis? If NBC maintains this current scheduling, their game of the week will turn into the game of the weak. KEVIN LAMAS Newbury Park
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1989 | BOB THOMAS, The Associated Press
"The only good Indian is a dead Indian." Such dialogue, so odious by today's standards, was common in Western movies a few decades ago. It stemmed from a remark attributed to Gen. Philip H. Sheridan when he was introduced to a Comanche chief in 1869. "Me Tochoway," said the chief. "Me good Indian." "The only good Indians I ever saw were dead," Sheridan snapped. The attitude of the Indian fighter was illustrated in countless movies from 1920 to 1960.
WORLD
August 7, 2003 | From Reuters
President Lucio Gutierrez's alliance with Ecuador's powerful Indian movement collapsed Wednesday, ending vital support that catapulted him into office last year in one of Latin America's most politically unstable countries. Presidential spokesman Marcelo Cevallos said the governing alliance broke up after lawmakers from Pachakutik, the leftist political branch of the Indian movement, voted to defeat a labor reform bill required by the International Monetary Fund.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The leader of the Oglala Sioux Tribe is proposing to establish an abortion clinic on an Indian reservation -- within the reach of women who seek the service, but outside the reach of a new state law that imposes a ban on nearly all abortions. Tribal President Cecelia Fire Thunder, a former nurse, said it was the prohibition on abortions in cases of rape that drew her to speak out. Her tribe is based on the Pine Ridge Reservation in southwestern South Dakota. State Atty. Gen.
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