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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011
Indigo In Search of the Color That Seduced the World Catherine E. McKinley Bloomsbury: 237 pps., $27
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NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
Fiber artist Niki Livingston dyes textiles using natural pigments and a combination of Japanese shibori and Nigerian adire techniques. The results are one-of-a kind works of fiber art, our latest picks in our Handmade Holidays gift guide. Livingston's repertoire has included curtains, duvet covers and clothing. For the holidays, Livingston has blankets ($275) created with a shibori technique (the fabric is folded, clamped or twisted). The blankets are handwoven in Indonesia and dyed by Livingston in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles using logwood (a type of willow)
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
What this town needs--almost anyone will tell you--is more good neighborhood restaurants. Well, another one has just been added to the ranks. Indigo, 8222 1/2 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles, (213) 653-0140, is a pretty, crowded little place at times where people wander in off the street to eat pizza and pasta and eclectic appetizers. It's not a big deal sort of restaurant, but the food is sophisticated and most dishes are below $10. And it's already so popular that when the heaters in the little patio went out a couple of nights ago quite a crowd gathered to wait for inside tables.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
If you like ultra-low airfares combined with dozens of passenger fees, get ready for the new Frontier Airlines. Republic Airways Holdings Inc. has agreed to sell the Denver-based carrier to Indigo Partners, the investors who helped finance the super-cheap carrier Spirit Airlines. Under the agreement announced Tuesday, Indigo will pay Republic $36 million in cash and take on $109 million in debt, according to a statement released by Republic Airway Holdings. Frontier, already considered a low-cost airline, is expected to adopt a business plan that will charge passengers a myriad of fees to compensate for the ultra-low fares.
BOOKS
June 28, 1987
In his review of Manlio Argueta's "Cuzcatlan" (The Book Review, June 14), Prof. Raymund Paredes states that "Argueta notes with particular vehemence the devastating consequences of the cultivation and processing of indigo . . . which early proved to be a lethal carcinogen." While the diversion of land to indigo-producing plants may well have had "devastating consequences," the assertion of the last clause is false. Indigo has not proved early, late or at any other time during its 4,000-year use as a dye to be carcinogenic.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011 | By Swati Pandey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Indigo is something of a mystery. It sits between the more familiar purple and blue of rainbows. And it's the elusive center of Catherine E. McKinley's "Indigo: In Search of the Color That Seduced the World" which like its eponymous shade, falls somewhere between more familiar poles. As history, it wanders, sometimes too hastily, through millenniums and contents to trace the reach and power of indigo dye and fabric. As memoir, it gorgeously recounts McKinley's journey to West Africa's teeming markets and churning factories, through funerals and uprisings, to find "the bluest of blues.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1989 | CHARLES PERRY
Indigo is jumping. It looks as if the whole neighborhood is here tonight, eating, drinking and table-hopping like mad. Another proof that the keys to restaurant success are location, location and location? No way. A lot of restaurants have gone out of business at this very corner. I think I've got its number. For starters, it's an easy-going, welcoming sort of room, with cane matting on the ceiling and a couple of semi-abstract paintings on the walls, such as the one that could be either a tornado or a telephone handset attacking from the sky. And it certainly knows its neighborhood, the midway point between the Farmer's Market and the Beverly Center.
IMAGE
August 22, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Last week, Sin City was the center of the denim-dealing universe, as purveyors and purchasers of the (usually) indigo-hued cloth clustered on trade show floors to write the next chapter in the history of what's arguably America's greatest contribution to the world's wardrobe. In preparation for the retail season six months hence, retail buyers and fashion industry press descended on the desert to roam the twice-yearly cluster of apparel trade shows staged here, most under the aegis of MAGIC, which originally stood for "Men's Apparel Guild in California," although it has long since switched states and grown to encompass women's clothes, footwear and accessories as well.
IMAGE
August 19, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
One of Southern California's most successful denim kingpins is jumping back in the jean pool. Peter Koral, who co-founded the 7 for All Mankind premium denim label in 2000 and built it into a business that VF Corp. purchased in 2007 for $775 million, has teamed up with his eldest son, 29-year-old David Koral, and fellow 7 for All Mankind alumnus Rick Crane to launch Koral Los Angeles. The line of women's premium denim started hitting retail shelves in late July. During a recent visit to the label's downtown showroom, father and son sat down to explain how the denim trade became a family business.
TRAVEL
December 12, 2010 | By Amanda Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When I was a teenager, I cut out a magazine photo showing a cowgirl riding a horse through thigh-high snow. The image was so exotic and romantic that I pasted it to my mirror as a reminder of what I wanted from life. So when I had the chance to take Indigo, my horse-mad 12-year-old daughter, to join friends at Vista Verde Ranch outside Steamboat Springs in midwinter, I had an ulterior motive: I was going to fulfill my cowgirl fantasy. The plan was to spend four nights at Vista Verde, a summer-winter guest ranch, and three at Steamboat Springs ski resort.
IMAGE
August 25, 2013 | Booth Moore; Ingrid Schmidt
Malhia Kent x 7FAM We've seen denim on the couture runways, and now denim brand 7 For All Mankind is bringing couture fabrics to a capsule collection of jeans. What started as a 7 For All Mankind inspiration trip to Paris turned into a visit to the famous Malhia Kent textile mill, which produces fabrics for the likes of Chanel, Proenza Schouler and Alexander McQueen. The designers were so enchanted, they tapped Malhia Kent to become the brand's latest collaborator. Available in September, the limited edition Malhia Kent x 7FAM jeans and jacket were created by piecing panels of luxurious metallic tweeds and jacquards together with the denim brand's new Slim Illusion Second Skin fabric, which has 100% elasticity, to mold and hold all the right places.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
Get ready for the takeoff of another super-cheap airline offering ultra-low fares with loads of passenger fees. Industry insiders say the new super discount airline may soon be launched with the help of Indigo Partners, the Phoenix private equity firm that invested in Spirit Airlines in 2006 and helped convince the Florida airline's chief executive, Ben Baldanza, to adopt dirt-cheap fares and abundant fees. Indigo is reportedly negotiating to buy Frontier Airlines from the Denver carrier's parent company, Republic Airways Holdings Inc. Meanwhile, Indigo has started to divest itself from Spirit, with Indigo owner William Franke and Indigo principal John Wilson resigning from the Spirit board of directors Wednesday.
IMAGE
August 19, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
One of Southern California's most successful denim kingpins is jumping back in the jean pool. Peter Koral, who co-founded the 7 for All Mankind premium denim label in 2000 and built it into a business that VF Corp. purchased in 2007 for $775 million, has teamed up with his eldest son, 29-year-old David Koral, and fellow 7 for All Mankind alumnus Rick Crane to launch Koral Los Angeles. The line of women's premium denim started hitting retail shelves in late July. During a recent visit to the label's downtown showroom, father and son sat down to explain how the denim trade became a family business.
FOOD
July 27, 2012 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Of the dozen tomato varieties displayed at Vang Thao's stand last Saturday, one, with purplish black skin over a flaming orange ground color, stood out spectacularly. It's a new variety, Indigo Rose, pigmented by anthocyanins, the same compounds responsible for the dark color in cherries, blood oranges and red cabbages, but not previously significant in cultivated tomatoes. It's noteworthy not so much because of the flavor - it's nice but not memorable - but because of the potential health benefits, and also just because of its sheer oddity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011
Indigo In Search of the Color That Seduced the World Catherine E. McKinley Bloomsbury: 237 pps., $27
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2011 | By Swati Pandey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Indigo is something of a mystery. It sits between the more familiar purple and blue of rainbows. And it's the elusive center of Catherine E. McKinley's "Indigo: In Search of the Color That Seduced the World" which like its eponymous shade, falls somewhere between more familiar poles. As history, it wanders, sometimes too hastily, through millenniums and contents to trace the reach and power of indigo dye and fabric. As memoir, it gorgeously recounts McKinley's journey to West Africa's teeming markets and churning factories, through funerals and uprisings, to find "the bluest of blues.
TRAVEL
December 20, 2009 | By Amanda Jones
Rose is 17 months old. She weighs 15 pounds and looks the size of an American 5-month-old. She cannot sit up, walk or speak. She has the toothpick limbs and saucer eyes of the malnourished and the dull skin of dehydration. In another corner is Caroline, a waifish 9-year-old who sleeps in a crib. She is a whispering, otherworldly child, pretty and fragile. Her parents are dead, and she is severely malnourished. I have just given her a teddy bear and accessories from a bag of toys we brought from the U.S. When I gave her the bear, she looked at me in disbelief.
TRAVEL
December 12, 2010 | By Amanda Jones, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When I was a teenager, I cut out a magazine photo showing a cowgirl riding a horse through thigh-high snow. The image was so exotic and romantic that I pasted it to my mirror as a reminder of what I wanted from life. So when I had the chance to take Indigo, my horse-mad 12-year-old daughter, to join friends at Vista Verde Ranch outside Steamboat Springs in midwinter, I had an ulterior motive: I was going to fulfill my cowgirl fantasy. The plan was to spend four nights at Vista Verde, a summer-winter guest ranch, and three at Steamboat Springs ski resort.
IMAGE
August 22, 2010 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Last week, Sin City was the center of the denim-dealing universe, as purveyors and purchasers of the (usually) indigo-hued cloth clustered on trade show floors to write the next chapter in the history of what's arguably America's greatest contribution to the world's wardrobe. In preparation for the retail season six months hence, retail buyers and fashion industry press descended on the desert to roam the twice-yearly cluster of apparel trade shows staged here, most under the aegis of MAGIC, which originally stood for "Men's Apparel Guild in California," although it has long since switched states and grown to encompass women's clothes, footwear and accessories as well.
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