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Indo Europeans

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NEWS
March 19, 1992 | MICHAEL MOREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The quest for the origins of the Indo-Europeans has all the fascination of an electric light in the open air on a summer night: It tends to attract every species of scholar or would-be savant who can take pen to hand. --J.P. Mallory, "In Search of the Indo-Europeans" To the untrained eye, the Volga-Don Steppe in southern Russia is a monotonously flat plain, its horizon broken only by occasional small hills.
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NEWS
March 19, 1992 | MICHAEL MOREAU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The quest for the origins of the Indo-Europeans has all the fascination of an electric light in the open air on a summer night: It tends to attract every species of scholar or would-be savant who can take pen to hand. --J.P. Mallory, "In Search of the Indo-Europeans" To the untrained eye, the Volga-Don Steppe in southern Russia is a monotonously flat plain, its horizon broken only by occasional small hills.
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FOOD
February 12, 1997 | CHARLES PERRY
Honey is beloved throughout Africa and Eurasia, though it couldn't have been the most obvious of foods to begin with; the first person to break into a beehive must have been either incredibly brave or incredibly stupid. But once the principle had been grasped, it could be taught. The ancient Indo-Europeans, not otherwise big shots in food history, apparently introduced honey to the Turks and Mongols, because their word for it, bal, seems to come from the Indo-European melit.
MAGAZINE
June 11, 1989 | JACQUES LESLIE, Jacques Leslie is a former Los Angeles Times foreign correspondent
IT IS HARD TO IMAGINE a book less likely than "The Goddesses and Gods of Old Europe" to cause a sensation. Its subject matter, the spiritual practices of people living in southeastern Europe 6,000 to 8,000 years ago, usually holds appeal for few people other than a fraction of the world's archeologists. Reflecting the fact that its author, Lithuanian-born Marija Gimbutas, writes for an academic audience, its prose is wooden. Even its publisher, a British firm called Thames & Hudson, was so uncertain of the book's success that it released the work in 1974 without publicity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marija Gimbutas, an internationally recognized archeologist whose research into early European cultures convinced her and other experts that women were revered as goddesses 6,000 to 8,000 years ago and that they presided over cities free of war, has died. Joan Marler, her friend and editor, said she was 73 when she died of cancer Wednesday at UCLA Medical Center.
BOOKS
February 18, 1990 | Rita Mae Brown, Brown is a free-lance writer
"The Language of the Goddess" represents the life work of Marija Gimbutas, professor of European archeology at UCLA, who excavated Neolithic settlements for 16 years. Using her main field of inquiry, Gimbutas has woven together comparative mythology, early historical sources, linguistics, ethnography and folklore to prove her case: that the language of the goddess undergirds our entire Western culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2006 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
When Abhijit Kurup began learning about Hinduism at his Claremont middle school, he could barely recognize his own religion. Textbooks portrayed the 6,000-year-old tradition as a religion of monkey and elephant gods, rigid caste discrimination and oppression of women, he said. "It degraded my religion," said Kurup, now a UC Riverside freshman. "I felt a mixture of anger, embarrassment and humiliation."
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | ISAAC ASIMOV
When the Cro-Magnon men painted their colorful animals deep in the caves of present-day France and Spain 25,000 years ago, what language did they speak? Would you believe that there are scientists who are seriously trying to answer that question? How can one possibly find out? Ancient people may leave their bones behind, and their tools, and even their art, but they don't leave any record of their language.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alla Pleshyvenko points to a fresh pile of soil left by grave robbers on the slopes of a Scythian burial mound. "They're looking for gold," she explains from atop the 22-foot-high knoll known as the First Brother. "They might find some too." Then again, they might not. In the 166 years since magnificent gold riches were found in Scythian graves, nearly all the earthen burial mounds, called kurgans, heaped on top of them have been robbed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2004 | Jill Leovy, Times Staff Writer
Zach Gaskin might be called a connoisseur of genotypes. At airports or company meetings, he studies faces, eyes, complexions. And sometimes, he just can't resist. "You look like an interesting mix," he'll say to strangers. "Can we test your DNA?" Those who are not too taken aback may become new entries in a growing catalog of DNA types being collected by Gaskin's employer.
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