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NEWS
December 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Suharto fired two military commanders whose troops shot to death pro-independence demonstrators last month in East Timor. Replaced were Maj. Gen. Sintong Pandjaitan and Brig. Gen. Rudolf S. Warouw. Indonesia's armed forces maintain that they fired in self-defense and that 19 demonstrators were shot to death Nov. 12 in Dili, capital of the Portuguese colony annexed by Indonesia in 1976.
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NEWS
August 20, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. human rights group accused both Indonesian troops and separatist rebels of unlawful killings and other rights abuses in the northwestern province of Aceh. In a 40-page report, New York-based Human Rights Watch said the Indonesian government "has failed utterly" to control the security forces, which have been blamed for the majority of atrocities in the 26-year war.
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NEWS
October 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of East Timorese soldiers and police have resigned from Indonesia's armed forces, the government said, deepening concern that they may join militias vowing to fight a multinational force in their homeland. Military commander Gen. Wiranto said about 600 former soldiers and police were among thousands of East Timorese refugees now in West Timor, an official said.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It might seem odd in a democracy for the nation's military and police to have 38 guaranteed seats in parliament. Or for the armed forces to raise much of their funding by operating their own businesses. But this is Indonesia, where the military helped run the country for more than three decades under former dictator Suharto and played a pivotal role last week in ousting President Abdurrahman Wahid.
NEWS
September 25, 1999 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second day of rioting here and news that the violence had claimed four lives prompted Indonesia's government late Friday to suspend a new law giving the military added powers to quell opposition and limit civil rights. The protests continued into the early hours today despite the announcement, but by dawn the crowds had broken up and the city was largely peaceful.
NEWS
September 7, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With even the national police chief calling the situation out of control, Indonesia imposed martial law in East Timor early today, transferring power from the province's civilian governor to Jakarta's army generals. The declaration of martial law was seen as an attempt by the Jakarta government to convince the world that it was taking steps to control the bloodletting.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
A July attack by Indonesian soldiers on a village in Aceh province left 51 unarmed civilians dead, a government fact-finding team has announced. Indonesia's official Antara news agency reported Saturday that investigators had dismissed the military's claims that many of those killed and five others who are missing had been separatist rebels. Investigation team member Azhary Basar said there was little evidence to suggest that there were any rebels in the village of Beutong Ateuh at the time.
NEWS
October 15, 1999 | Associated Press
Australian Maj. Gen. Peter Cosgrove, the commander of peacekeepers in East Timor, on Thursday proposed establishment of a buffer zone along the border with West Timor to prevent further clashes between his troops and Indonesian forces. Relations between the peacekeepers and Indonesian forces were strained by a gun battle Sunday along the border separating Indonesian-controlled West Timor from East Timor, which recently voted for independence from Indonesia.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. administration in East Timor indicted an Indonesian army officer and 10 other suspects on war crimes charges in a series of killings around the time of last year's independence referendum. The suspects, the first to be charged with crimes against humanity in the province, are accused in the slayings of five clergymen, two church workers, an Indonesian journalist and a teenager.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing on the sidewalk of Salemba Raya, a broad street lined with the charred hulks of 10 buildings torched the day before by pro-democracy protesters, a middle-aged businessman pondered the future Sunday. "All the people need peace, need hope . . . but the trouble will continue," he said, watching a tense face-off between soldiers and scattered groups of protesters.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesian naval forces stormed a hijacked Singaporean oil tanker and arrested the pirate gang that seized the vessel last week. The Selayang, chartered by Shell Oil Co., was hijacked June 19 after it left Port Dickson, Malaysia. It was bound for Labuan, Malaysia. Authorities in Malaysia and Singapore assisted Indonesia in the arrest operation. There was no immediate word on the crew's fate.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. administration in East Timor indicted an Indonesian army officer and 10 other suspects on war crimes charges in a series of killings around the time of last year's independence referendum. The suspects, the first to be charged with crimes against humanity in the province, are accused in the slayings of five clergymen, two church workers, an Indonesian journalist and a teenager.
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | From Associated Press
Police investigating a series of bombings in this capital arrested two members of the armed forces after a shootout, officers said Monday. Newly installed national police chief Gen. Bimantoro Suroyo said the two had acted as individuals and denied suggestions that the military as a whole was behind the blasts, which included an explosion at the Jakarta Stock Exchange on Sept. 13 that killed 15 people.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia's military admitted that some of its troops have taken sides in the long-running Christian-Muslim war in the Molucca Islands. Two days after television footage showed Indonesian troops fighting alongside Muslim militants, armed forces spokesman Rear Air Marshal Graito Usodo said, "There are members of Indonesia's military who act emotionally, either because of their family names or where they come from. This is inevitable, and we admit the existence of these cases."
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a landmark human rights trial, 13 soldiers admitted Tuesday that they dragged 26 injured student activists into a field and shot them to death in Aceh province, but they also argued that they should not be punished because they were following orders. One defendant, Lt. Trijoko Adiwiyono, said that when he questioned the order to shoot the students in the field, he was slapped by his commander, Lt. Col. Sudjono. "He might have shot me if I had rejected his order," Adiwiyono testified.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Indonesia's new reformist government convened a trial Wednesday of soldiers accused in the massacre of 57 students and teachers in strife-torn Aceh province on the northern tip of Sumatra island. The trial was meant to show Indonesia's determination to clean up its human rights record, but activists in the country and abroad doubted the value of a proceeding in which no senior commanders have been charged.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As elections go, it was pro forma. The session lasted only 20 minutes and there was no voting. The People's Consultative Assembly session was more an acclamation than a cliffhanger for President Suharto of Indonesia as he was reelected for a sixth five-year term to lead the world's fourth most populous country.
NEWS
February 21, 1988
An Indonesian parliamentary committee announced agreement on legislation enshrining the role of the military in the country's political life. Texts of the two bills have not been published, but Defense Minister S. Poniman said they codify the army's role in politics and defense that has marked the regime of President Suharto since he came to power 22 years ago.
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Indonesia's president, Abdurrahman Wahid, moved to consolidate his control over the country's restive military, dismissing the armed forces' chief spokesman, whose public comments had stoked rumors of a rift between the president and the troops. In Jakarta, the capital, the president said military spokesman Maj. Gen. Sudradjat had been replaced by air force Rear Marshal Graito Husodo.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | Reuters
The Indonesian military urged the government today to declare a civil emergency in the eastern island of Ambon, where religious clashes that have killed at least 55 people entered their fourth day. The clashes, which started Sunday after rumors that a Muslim youth had been run over by a Christian, continued overnight with angry mobs torching several buildings, a military spokesman said. "Fighting is still continuing," Lt. Col.
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