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NEWS
September 24, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relations between the United States and this country, traditionally one of Washington's staunchest allies in Southeast Asia, are at a frosty low ebb over human rights and labor practices. A team of officials from the office of U.S.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fate of Indonesia rests largely on the shoulders of people like Liem Sioe Liong and Hendra Lie. Liem is an elderly, publicity-shy billionaire whose vast empire includes the country's largest cement and steel plants. Lie is an outspoken 30-year-old garment factory owner. They are very different people with one thing in common: their Chinese ancestry.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fate of Indonesia rests largely on the shoulders of people like Liem Sioe Liong and Hendra Lie. Liem is an elderly, publicity-shy billionaire whose vast empire includes the country's largest cement and steel plants. Lie is an outspoken 30-year-old garment factory owner. They are very different people with one thing in common: their Chinese ancestry.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Mattel Inc. on Thursday established a code of conduct for its suppliers and contractors prohibiting the use of child labor and the breaking of minimum wage laws. The El Segundo-based maker of Barbie dolls and other best-selling toys said the code doesn't allow its plants or contractors to hire workers under the age of 16 or to use forced labor or prison labor. Mattel said it will terminate suppliers that fail to meet the standards.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before a state visit by President Clinton, an Indonesian court Monday sentenced the leader of the country's largest independent labor union to three years in prison for allegedly inciting workers to violence earlier this year. Muchtar Pakpahan was the fourth senior official of the Indonesian Prosperous Labor Union to be sentenced to prison in connection with riots in the Sumatran city of Medan in April.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1994
The Republic of Indonesia, which once relied on oil as its chief asset, has worked hard to diversify its economy since oil prices began tumbling in the early 1980s. Those efforts have begun to pay off. The agriculture and service sectors have shown growth and manufacturing is growing rapidly. ECONOMY: In the past decade, Indonesia has experienced growth in gross domestic product similar to the fast pace of growth in other Southeast Asia nations.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Mattel Inc. on Thursday established a code of conduct for its suppliers and contractors prohibiting the use of child labor and the breaking of minimum wage laws. The El Segundo-based maker of Barbie dolls and other best-selling toys said the code doesn't allow its plants or contractors to hire workers under the age of 16 or to use forced labor or prison labor. Mattel said it will terminate suppliers that fail to meet the standards.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suyatmi, a shy, 20-year-old factory worker, is too poor to know much about sneakers. She never heard of Bo Jackson and is too skinny to care about aerobics. Her world consists of a rented, five-foot-square room in a shantytown where she sleeps on the concrete floor with three other young women. Every day at 7 a.m., Suyatmi begins work at P. T. Hardaya Aneka Shoes Industry, one of six companies in Indonesia making sports shoes for Nike Inc., the spectacularly successful U.S.
NEWS
December 13, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 21-year-old woman with little formal education and bleak prospects, Rasiya never considered herself a radical. But she did not hesitate when her fellow workers got up from their sewing machines and marched out on strike. Rasiya is one of 6,000 young women employed by an ethnic Chinese businessman to make Adidas sports shoes for the American and European markets. The shoes cost more than $100 a pair when they finally reach the boutiques of the West, but the workers take home only $1.39 a day.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1997 | Associated Press
A violent union protest involving nearly 5,000 workers at an Indonesian factory that makes shoes for Nike Inc. was resolved after the owner, PT Hardaya Aneka Shoe Industry, agreed to a 10.7% pay increase, a Nike spokesman said. Angry workers at the factory outside Jakarta said they were not being paid Indonesia's $2.50-a-day minimum wage, but Nike said they receive more than that. The Beaverton, Ore.
NEWS
December 13, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 21-year-old woman with little formal education and bleak prospects, Rasiya never considered herself a radical. But she did not hesitate when her fellow workers got up from their sewing machines and marched out on strike. Rasiya is one of 6,000 young women employed by an ethnic Chinese businessman to make Adidas sports shoes for the American and European markets. The shoes cost more than $100 a pair when they finally reach the boutiques of the West, but the workers take home only $1.39 a day.
NEWS
November 8, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before a state visit by President Clinton, an Indonesian court Monday sentenced the leader of the country's largest independent labor union to three years in prison for allegedly inciting workers to violence earlier this year. Muchtar Pakpahan was the fourth senior official of the Indonesian Prosperous Labor Union to be sentenced to prison in connection with riots in the Sumatran city of Medan in April.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1994
The Republic of Indonesia, which once relied on oil as its chief asset, has worked hard to diversify its economy since oil prices began tumbling in the early 1980s. Those efforts have begun to pay off. The agriculture and service sectors have shown growth and manufacturing is growing rapidly. ECONOMY: In the past decade, Indonesia has experienced growth in gross domestic product similar to the fast pace of growth in other Southeast Asia nations.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relations between the United States and this country, traditionally one of Washington's staunchest allies in Southeast Asia, are at a frosty low ebb over human rights and labor practices. A team of officials from the office of U.S.
NEWS
September 22, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suyatmi, a shy, 20-year-old factory worker, is too poor to know much about sneakers. She never heard of Bo Jackson and is too skinny to care about aerobics. Her world consists of a rented, five-foot-square room in a shantytown where she sleeps on the concrete floor with three other young women. Every day at 7 a.m., Suyatmi begins work at P. T. Hardaya Aneka Shoes Industry, one of six companies in Indonesia making sports shoes for Nike Inc., the spectacularly successful U.S.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | JIM MANN
Is the Clinton administration serious this time? Or is this yet another Washington version of an Indonesian shadow play? Those are the questions that come to mind about President Clinton's Asia policy in the early days of his second term. For strange as it may sound, given the role Indonesian-linked money has played in the furor over Democratic Party fund-raising, Clinton is quietly laying the groundwork for what could be a new, tougher policy to combat Indonesia's repressive labor practices.
NEWS
December 15, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
In every crisis, there is opportunity. But in the financial crisis still rattling Asia, the Clinton administration may be missing the most promising opportunity to point these troubled economies toward a more stable and equitable future.
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