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WORLD
August 29, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
An Indonesian volcano that had been dormant for more than four centuries erupted for the second day in a row Monday, spewing white clouds of smoke and ash more than 2,000 yards into the air, officials and witnesses said. Thousands of people living along the slopes of Mt. Sinabung in North Sumatra province have been evacuated to emergency shelters, mosques and churches, said Priyadi Kardono, a spokesman for the National Disaster Management Agency. Their abandoned villages and crops are blanketed in heavy, gray soot.
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WORLD
February 14, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
At least three people were killed and tens of thousands forced to flee their homes when a volcano erupted on Indonesia's most populous island, shutting down airports and showering the region with ash and grit. The eruption of Mt. Kelud in Java began late Thursday night and could be heard as far as 125 miles away, according to local news reports . “The eruption sounded like thousands of bombs exploding,” Ratno Pramono, a 35-year-old farmer from the nearby village of Sugihwaras, told the Associated Press.
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WORLD
October 5, 2009 | Charles McDermid, McDermid is a special correspondent.
Uly Marisa picked up her broom and swept away broken glass and shattered pottery Sunday as the haunting wail of noon prayers rang out over her battered neighborhood in Padang. The radio station employee has lived through several earthquakes since she moved to this port city of 900,000 people several years ago. But last Wednesday's magnitude 7.6 quake, which killed hundreds of people, was the worst by far. It left her deeply shaken and reflective. "Everything happens as a lesson from God to us," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Act of Killing" takes more than a little getting used to. It's a mind-bending film, devastating and disorienting, that disturbs us in ways we're not used to being disturbed, raising questions about the nature of documentary, the persistence of evil, and the intertwined ways movies function in our culture and in our minds. Director Joshua Oppenheimer accurately calls this film "a documentary of the imagination," and its unusual form and style meant he worked on it for nearly eight years without any guarantee that it would turn out well.
WORLD
March 19, 2010 | By John M. Glionna
Cancel the speeches, the honor guard and welcoming parties. Indonesia's adopted son isn't coming home just yet. Across the sprawling archipelago Friday, people took the news stoically that President Obama had postponed his trip here next week to attend to a pressing political agenda back home, getting his healthcare initiative passed into law. The press continued its coverage that treated Obama more as rock star than political leader. White House officials said Obama would delay until June the trip to Indonesia and Australia designed to cement ties in a region that has seen rising Chinese influence.
NEWS
October 22, 1986 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
The boys laid out the food on a rough-planked platform 20 feet above ground amid the trees and vines, reached by ladder from the jungle floor. Then, higher still, branches rattled and leaves shook. The orangutans were coming. This day there would be three for the afternoon feeding at the Bohorok Orangutan Rehabilitation Center. They represented a small victory for the animals in the clash between man and wildlife on the big Indonesian island of Sumatra.
WORLD
September 8, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A small Indonesian military plane crashed on Borneo with nine passengers and crew aboard, killing four, the national search and rescue agency said. The Nomad P837 light aircraft was on a routine patrol when it lost contact with air traffic control about 1 p.m., said navy spokesman Rear Adm. Iskandar Sitompul. The survivors were taken to a small island off the eastern coast of Borneo for treatment, said Anggit, a rescue agency spokesman who, like many Indonesians, uses a single name.
NEWS
August 18, 2002 | LELY T. DJUHARI, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Penniless, unmarried and far from home, Rubina thought that she had found a safe place to have her baby after being fired as a housemaid in Malaysia. Instead, the 20-year-old Indonesian migrant worker had stumbled into the arms of baby traders--an illegal practice that authorities say is increasing in Malaysia and targets poor Indonesians. "I had nowhere to turn. My boss told me to leave when my stomach started showing," Rubina said recently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1996 | Associated Press and a Times staff writer
An Indonesian businessman accused of slaying three people and stashing their bodies in a Northridge storage facility may no longer have any lawyers to defend him, a newspaper reported this weekend. Harnoko Dewantono fired his lawyers minutes before his trial began Thursday in Indonesia, according to the Associated Press. He named another attorney, Amir Syamsuddin, during his court appearance.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2002
WORLD
December 7, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
When he was reelected president of Indonesia three years ago, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono vowed to combat corruption. Now a landmark corruption investigation threatens to tarnish his own political party, as his former presidential spokesman steps down over allegations of graft. Youth and Sports Minister Andi Alfian Mallarangeng stepped down Friday after being named a suspect in an investigation centering on the construction of a $122-million sports complex in West Java, according to news reports.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2012 | By Gregory Karp
Chicago-based Boeing Co. finalized what it calls a historic order for 230 aircraft worth $22.4 billion. Lion Air of Indonesia ordered 201 of the Boeing 737 Max planes and 29 next-generation 737-900ERs. The deal also includes purchase rights for an additional 150 airplanes. The order is the largest commercial airplane deal ever for Boeing, measured by both dollar value and total number of airplanes. Lion Air will be the first airline in Asia to fly the 737 Max and the first in the world to take delivery of the 737 Max-900.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2011 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Environmentalists have launched a global campaign against Mattel Inc., the world's largest toy company, as part of a decade-long effort to force multinational corporations to purge their operations of any links to rain forest destruction. On Tuesday, Greenpeace activists in turquoise vests rappelled down the face of the company's 15-story headquarters in El Segundo and hung a giant banner depicting a frowning Ken doll with the message: "Barbie: it's over. I don't date girls that are into deforestation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Michael J. Ybarra, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In 1930, Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias and his wife, Rose, traveled to the island of Bali in Indonesia and promptly fell in love with what they saw. They stayed nine months, soaking up the natural beauty and distinct culture. Covarrubias later wrote a classic book called "Island of Bali," which somewhat overshadowed the art he made on the trip. One of those paintings is a stylized map of Bali, showing the diamond-shaped island dominated by smoking volcanoes towering over lush valleys and hillsides terraced into rice fields.
WORLD
August 29, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
An Indonesian volcano that had been dormant for more than four centuries erupted for the second day in a row Monday, spewing white clouds of smoke and ash more than 2,000 yards into the air, officials and witnesses said. Thousands of people living along the slopes of Mt. Sinabung in North Sumatra province have been evacuated to emergency shelters, mosques and churches, said Priyadi Kardono, a spokesman for the National Disaster Management Agency. Their abandoned villages and crops are blanketed in heavy, gray soot.
FOOD
August 19, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There's a glistening chicken somewhere under the blanket of crispy rice-flour crumbles. The crystalline snowflake-like particles are scattered over the entire bird, its skin sluiced with a squeeze of lime and spiced with a dab of sambal , shrimp paste and chiles ground into a pungent, penetrating blast of heat. Time seems to stand still for that chicken: Phones quit chirping and fidgety kids suddenly snap to attention, transfixed by the fried delights of the ayam goreng kremesan at Merry's House of Chicken, a months-old Indonesian restaurant in West Covina.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | From Reuters
The health of about 50 million Indonesians is threatened by the widespread use of pesticides, an environmental group told Parliament. The head of the Assn. of Indonesian Enviromental Health Experts, Rajin Sinulingga, told a parliamentary hearing Monday that pesticide poisoning has increased dramatically over the last five years. He said that at least half of Indonesia's rural population of 100 million could be suffering from chronic poisoning.
OPINION
October 25, 2004
Re "Indonesia's First Popularly Elected President Sworn In," Oct. 21: I was impressed with your exhaustive coverage of the myriad issues facing Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, especially considering the recent, and misguided, focus in Indonesia reporting on terrorism alone. But it is wrong, however, to call Indonesia a "Muslim country," when in fact Indonesians are quite proud of their multi-religious composition. The state has no official religion, and the judiciary uses Roman-Dutch, not Sharia, law. This misnomer is equivalent to calling the United States a "Christian country," despite the millions of people who adhere to other religions or no religion at all. This distinction is crucial for better understanding of the world's fourth most populous country and its role, or perhaps lack thereof, in terrorism and our "crusade" against it. Evan White Pasadena
WORLD
July 23, 2010 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration said Thursday that it would resume limited assistance to Indonesia's special forces, which have been barred from receiving U.S. military aid for more than a decade because of human rights abuses. The decision probably will face criticism from human rights groups and some members of Congress who contend that human rights violations by the special forces, including their role in a violent crackdown on separatists in East Timor in the late 1990s, have not been thoroughly investigated.
WORLD
July 16, 2010 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
Inside a dimly lighted living room in the heart of the Javanese forest, Dede Koswara blankly examines his bulky hands, which have morphed to the size of catcher's mitts. He shuffles along on blackened, bloated feet, a prisoner of his own mutinous body. For years, the slender construction worker watched helplessly as his limbs broke out in a swath of grotesque bark-like warts that sapped his energy and limited his mobility. At one point, he seemed to sprout contorted yellow-brown branches 3 feet long.
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