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June 30, 1990 | Reuters
More than 2,000 victims of the 1984 Bhopal gas tragedy, the world's worst industrial accident, demonstrated Friday outside Prime Minister Vishwanath Pratap Singh's home in New Delhi to protest slow distribution of relief. More than 2,500 people were killed and about 500,000 were injured Dec. 3, 1984, in Bhopal in central India when poisonous gas leaked out of a pesticide plant owned by an Indian subsidiary of the Union Carbide Corp. of the United States.
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NEWS
November 21, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The late afternoon is sunny and pleasant, the breeze refreshing. Not like that night a decade ago. Inside a dark hovel, Safiya Khan, 55, lies inert on her unkempt cot. Her eyes are glassy, and she wheezes painfully. She paws at her left hand, swathed in rags to soothe the itching that began 10 days ago. "She is on her deathbed," says husband Shahejed Khan.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
India Seizes Union Carbide Dividend: An Indian court ordered seizure of $2.3 million in dividends that an Indian subsidiary owes Union Carbide Corp. for the years 1984 to 1991. The multinational company has a 50.9% stake in Union Carbide India Ltd., owner of the chemical plant in Bhopal in central India that spewed poison gas that killed more than 3,800 people in late 1984.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Union Carbide Ex-Chairman Ordered to Face Trial in India: An Indian court ordered former Union Carbide Corp. Chairman Warren Anderson to face trial in the 1984 Bhopal gas disaster. Bhopal Chief Magistrate Gopal Sharma issued an order saying Anderson "committed an offense of culpable homicide, not amounting to murder, voluntarily causing grievous hurt by dangerous weapons or means . . . and the commission of such offenses with criminal intention or knowledge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1988 | Associated Press
A fire destroyed a plastics factory Saturday and injured at least 45 people, 20 of them critically, Indian police said.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1992 | From Reuters
An Indian court Thursday ordered the confiscation of all Union Carbide Corp.'s assets in the country, seven years after the chemical company's pesticide factory spewed deadly gas over Bhopal in the world's worst industrial disaster. Bhopal District Court Magistrate Gulab Sharma ordered the seizure of Union Carbide's 50.9% share in its subsidiary, Union Carbide India Ltd. Sharma, hearing a criminal suit brought by the Indian government against Danbury, Conn.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | From Associated Press
An Indian court Friday requested the extradition of a retired American executive to face homicide charges for the 1984 Bhopal gas disaster that killed thousands of people. His company condemned the action. In addition to the extradition request, which must be approved by India's government before being forwarded to the United States, the court also issued an arrest warrant for Warren Anderson, formerly of Union Carbide Corp.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Union Carbide Ex-Chairman Ordered to Face Trial in India: An Indian court ordered former Union Carbide Corp. Chairman Warren Anderson to face trial in the 1984 Bhopal gas disaster. Bhopal Chief Magistrate Gopal Sharma issued an order saying Anderson "committed an offense of culpable homicide, not amounting to murder, voluntarily causing grievous hurt by dangerous weapons or means . . . and the commission of such offenses with criminal intention or knowledge."
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | Associated Press
India's Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a $470-million settlement but ordered new criminal proceedings against Union Carbide Corp. in the 1984 Bhopal gas disaster, which killed more than 3,800 people. The five-judge panel lifted the criminal immunity granted to the Danbury, Conn.-based company and its Indian subsidiary in the world's deadliest industrial disaster. The decision also frees the money, already paid by Union Carbide, for distribution to victims and their families.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 2,000 victims of the 1984 Bhopal, India, gas leak disaster marched through the city, shouting slogans and waving placards to protest the $470-million settlement between their government and Union Carbide Corp. of Danbury, Conn. It was the second anniversary of the settlement. Initially, the government had demanded $3 billion for the toxic gas leak at the Union Carbide-operated pesticide plant in Bhopal. At least 3,700 people were killed and more than 20,000 injured.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | Reuters
More than 2,000 victims of the 1984 Bhopal gas tragedy, the world's worst industrial accident, demonstrated Friday outside Prime Minister Vishwanath Pratap Singh's home in New Delhi to protest slow distribution of relief. More than 2,500 people were killed and about 500,000 were injured Dec. 3, 1984, in Bhopal in central India when poisonous gas leaked out of a pesticide plant owned by an Indian subsidiary of the Union Carbide Corp. of the United States.
NEWS
April 6, 1989
India's Supreme Court said the Bhopal gas leak case is not over despite the $470-million compensation payment by Union Carbide Corp. The court said that Union Carbide is still under its jurisdiction as long as it is hearing petitions challenging the Feb. 14 settlement. Critics say Union Carbide paid too little and challenge the validity of the law under which the settlement was made.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | United Press International
Clouds of chlorine gas swept through a congested street in the eastern port city of Calcutta on Friday, killing four people and sickening more than 200 others. Authorities said the gas leaked out in the pre-dawn hours from a 25-gallon metal cylinder at a small paint factory located in the Kalighat area of the eastern West Bengal state capital of Calcutta, 810 miles southeast of New Delhi.
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