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OPINION
November 29, 2002
Re "EPA Eases Pollution Guidelines," Nov. 23: So the Bush administration, in its infinite wisdom, is allowing industrial polluters to escape requirements for state-of-the-art pollution controls because it feels that if industry is allowed more flexibility it will "voluntarily" reduce pollution. I say we test this theory by forcing industry executives (and the EPA's chief, Christie Whitman) to move their families downwind of the polluting plants. This will encourage them to "put their money where their lungs are."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
For more than four decades, a grimy, rough-edged stretch of Branford Street in Pacoima has been known as Dismantler Row: a stronghold of metal recyclers, trucking yards, rock cutters, salvage yards and auto body shops. Oily water streams out of yards each day, fills the cracks and potholes of the street's narrow, asphalt lanes and gushes into storm drains and downstream to the sea. Shops without names hack and hammer at cars in alleyways strewn with discarded tires and trash. Saws and sanders blow granite dust out doors and windows like a white fog. Residents of surrounding neighborhoods have had enough.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking its cue from a successful California project, the Bush Administration said Wednesday that it will allow businesses and industries to avoid expensive pollution-control measures by buying and junking perhaps millions of smog-spewing old cars. The Environmental Protection Agency will issue guidelines within the next month encouraging states to adopt voluntary programs in which industrial polluters would receive credits for retiring old cars that emit the highest levels of pollution.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2004 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
The Defense Department, having won exemptions from three major environmental laws in the last two years, now is seeking to be excused from three more. Requirements of the Endangered Species Act, the Marine Mammal Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act already do not apply to the Pentagon. Now it wants exemptions from the Clean Air Act and two toxic waste laws, which Congress has refused to grant in each of the past two years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989
I read with interest the Feldsteins' article. Well written, well argued, however, when boiled down it tells us this: "We must go ahead and kill ourselves with industrial pollution because it would be too expensive and too inconvenient to stay alive." Their economists' approach pushed my doggerel button and this came out: "When they speak of pollution and such, the Feldsteins are quite out of touch; "Don't bother to strive, too keep us alive, for living will cost us too much.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | Reuters
China's capital has become one of the world's most polluted capitals, with air 35 times dirtier than London's and 16 times more contaminated than crowded Tokyo's, the Chinese media said Tuesday. Soot from the burning of coal and sulfur dioxide emissions from heavy industry send air pollution above official limits in the capital and 59 other cities, said the China Youth News, quoting the results of China's first survey of industrial pollution.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The clouds of black smoke billowing from this capital's 300 public bathhouses disappeared Tuesday--as they will every Tuesday for the next three months--as industrial polluters joined a controversial program to help clean up the air. Bathhouses--notorious polluters because of their fuel-oil-burning boilers--agreed Monday to become the first sector to participate in a "One Day Without Industry" program. Tuesday will be their day to close.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Concerned that Southern California's smoggy air will remain dirty, or perhaps even get worse in the next few years, leading clean air activists on Wednesday announced their opposition to the region's controversial pollution exchange proposal. The announcement by the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Coalition for Clean Air and the American Lung Assn. heats up an already fervent battle that is dividing the Southland's business community.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You might not think that you can help the environment by working at a shoe store or a carpet-cleaning service, much less by showing up at 3M in Camarillo five days a week to make magnetic tape. But lately, these have become quite respectable ways to help with recycling, detoxifying and waste reduction. And, if you're just plain looking for work, they're good situations to check out.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico is a nation ripe for environmental abuse. Economically, the country is striving to attract investment and create jobs after eight years of crisis. Geographically, it sits next door to the United States, whose more stringent pollution regulations make Mexico a tempting destination for factories running away from environmental restrictions or manufacturers looking for a cheap, if illicit, toxic waste dump.
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | Pete Thomas
With surfers increasingly on the front lines of the bacterial cocktails flowing from coastal runoff, the surf business is stepping up its role in the clean water fight. The Surf Industry Manufacturers Assn., or SIMA, has distributed $320,000 to eight environmental groups to combat pollution, conserve sensitive sites, maintain the integrity of established surf breaks and spread the eco word to the younger generation of surfers.
OPINION
January 31, 2003 | Paul Koretz and Joan Hartmann
The Bush administration issues daily communiques on a seemingly inevitable war with Iraq, but beneath the radar it is engaged in an assault on the nation's environmental laws. The Kyoto treaty on global warming, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Endangered Species Act and provisions to protect public lands have been attacked. An obscure notice in the Jan. 15 Federal Register listed the latest target, the Clean Water Act.
OPINION
November 29, 2002
Re "EPA Eases Pollution Guidelines," Nov. 23: So the Bush administration, in its infinite wisdom, is allowing industrial polluters to escape requirements for state-of-the-art pollution controls because it feels that if industry is allowed more flexibility it will "voluntarily" reduce pollution. I say we test this theory by forcing industry executives (and the EPA's chief, Christie Whitman) to move their families downwind of the polluting plants. This will encourage them to "put their money where their lungs are."
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | From Associated Press
EPA Administrator Christie Whitman suggested Thursday that power plants sued for pollution violations might want to delay settling their cases until an appeals court rules on a federal utility's challenge to her agency's orders. That type of advice, said Eric Schaeffer, the Environmental Protection Agency's former director of civil enforcement, is why he resigned last week, protesting what he said was a White House determination to weaken clean air regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fields vanished and the neighbors grew old, but there was always life in those rheumy eyes, a singsong fight in the soul of Clymar Avenue, and in the soul of Marguerite Lewis. Right to the end, Lewis tried to chase them out--the chemical companies and die casters, the diesel trucks and waste dumps that kept creeping up on the little nest she spent half a life defending. She came fluttering and chirping out of her ranch-style home, a mockingbird after a hawk.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of its sweeping effort to stimulate more energy supply, the Bush administration is scheduled to release by Friday its reassessment of a key tool aimed at reducing air pollution from power plants, factories and other major polluters. In its potential ramifications for public health, the outcome could dwarf the environmental issues, such as Arctic oil drilling and global warming, that have made headlines in the administration's first seven months.
NEWS
October 11, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For the first time in its 50-year history, Southern California's air quality protection agency adopted a strategy designed specifically to combat toxic air pollution in poor, nonwhite neighborhoods.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1992 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A citizens group Tuesday accused three local companies of "appalling" levels of industrial pollution and said it intends to file suit unless the firms comply with federal anti-pollution guidelines within 60 days. The California Public Interest Research Group, or Cal-PIRG, announced at a news conference that it intends to bring suit against Chem-Tronics Inc. of El Cajon, Palomar Plating Co. Inc. of Escondido and the San Diego-based Kelco Division of Merck & Co. Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN and JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State water regulators Monday released a list of 142 San Fernando Valley sites where they have asked property owners to help determine whether chromium 6 may have been discharged in ways that contributed to soil and ground water contamination. The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board sent letters to the Valley businesses on Nov. 8 to help pinpoint the source of pollution by chromium 6, a suspected carcinogen featured in the film "Erin Brockovich."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2000 | JUDY SILBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents near a waste transfer station in Stanton say they suffer on hot summer days. The heat is one thing, but there's also the smell. "It gets pretty bad," said Eric Schommer, 42, who lives in a condominium complex next door to the CR&R Inc. facility on Knott Avenue, where nearly 1,500 tons of trash is processed daily. "It's not consistent, [but] it's overpowering. And you can't smell anything else." Relief may be on the way.
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