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Industrial Revolution

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1999
Concerns over working conditions, child labor and industrial harm to the environment fueled recent protests at the World Trade Organization Summit in Seattle, but these are issues that have roots in the Industrial Revolution of 200 years ago. The Industrial Age, which began in England in the mid-1700s, moved workers from farms to factories as technological advances such as the water loom, steam engine and mass production transformed the way people work.
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SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | By Philip Hersh
LONDON - In a city that knows how to do ceremony, from hoary rituals formalized in the Middle Ages to celebrating the Queen's Diamond Jubilee last month partly through the Twitter feed @BritishMonarchy, an atmosphere of whimsy and party won out over pomp and circumstance during an Olympic opening ceremony that allowed an economically beleaguered Britain to pat itself on the back. Starting from his conviction that Britain "rebooted human existence" with the Industrial Revolution, director Danny Boyle called the entertainment piece of the nearly four-hour ceremony Friday night a "celebration of the creativity, exuberance and, above all, the generosity of the British people.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1995 | KIRKPATRICK SALE
About 15 years ago, the executives of IBM got together the biggest academic and intellectual mandarins they could find, best hotels, all expenses paid, to discuss the question of the long-term implications of the computer for American society. After a week of discussions, the experts threw up their hands and said they couldn't possibly foretell the range of impacts the computer would have in even the short run, much less the long.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Jeff Vandermeer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Most Powerful Idea in the World A Story of Steam, Industry, and Invention William Rosen Random House: 372 pp., $28 A young Steampunk's dream, William Rosen's "The Most Powerful Idea in the World" manages to make sense of the many threads that together tell the story of the origins and applications of steam power. The book has a crackling energy to it, often as riveting as it is educational. Rosen, in pursuit of evidence, makes interesting, even exciting, such subjects as patent law from the Roman Tiberius on, technological innovation in ancient China and the role of practice in separating out accomplished performers from the "merely good."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1994 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is a Times staff writer. and
On an indoor basketball court near Echo Park, all the principals, chorus members and supernumeraries in the Los Angeles Music Center Opera "Faust" are rehearsing the complex Kermesse scene that ends Act I in the production opening Friday. The supers all wear name tags that list the multiple roles they play in Charles Gounod's lyric adaptation of Goethe: a body snatcher in one scene, a priest in another, a malevolent monk in a third. And those tags reveal that this is no ordinary production.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Jeff Vandermeer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Most Powerful Idea in the World A Story of Steam, Industry, and Invention William Rosen Random House: 372 pp., $28 A young Steampunk's dream, William Rosen's "The Most Powerful Idea in the World" manages to make sense of the many threads that together tell the story of the origins and applications of steam power. The book has a crackling energy to it, often as riveting as it is educational. Rosen, in pursuit of evidence, makes interesting, even exciting, such subjects as patent law from the Roman Tiberius on, technological innovation in ancient China and the role of practice in separating out accomplished performers from the "merely good."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1989
Concerning the French Revolution, you dwelt mostly on its excesses and shortcomings. Remember, too, that it abolished ancient political and economic wrongs. Its constitution proclaimed many freedoms and much justice. The bloody terror and destructive events of the 19th Century are always to be lamented. However, our own revolution, did not, as the article claimed, establish continued democracy. Have you forgotten slavery? What of the horrors of the Industrial Revolution which gave great wealth to a few and great misery to many?
NEWS
June 3, 2004 | F. Kathleen Foley
Hard Times, Dickens' shortest and arguably most humorless work is a hard nut to crack. Intrinsically didactic and self-righteous in tone, the piece tackles the shortcomings of the social utilitarianism prevalent in its day, as well as the evils of the Industrial Revolution and the inequities of the era's harsh divorce laws.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
President Obama's plans to lead America out of recession rest in part on a task bigger than a moon shot and the Manhattan Project put together. His goal, which past presidents have spent more than $100 billion chasing with limited success, is to replace imported oil and other fossil fuels with a "clean-energy economy" powered by the wind, the sun and biofuels. The stakes are high. If Obama succeeds, he could spark a domestic jobs boom and lead an international fight against climate change.
OPINION
January 19, 2009
Re "Spreading the atheist word," Jan. 12 There are many understandings, gained by those enlightened, of the nature of a universal intelligence that some call "God." Dawkins gets to choose, and limit his attack to the least defensible concept: a wise person, sort of like us, who lives in Heaven. He is correct; there's probably no God like that. William Vietinghoff Thousand Oaks
OPINION
January 19, 2009
Re "A smarter stimulus," editorial, Jan. 15 I certainly agree with your point: "We need to equip students ... for the next industrial revolution." Yet on your front page is an item about USC quarterback Mark Sanchez and his multimillion-dollar future. Where are the front-page headlines about student-athletes' accomplishments, or our high school and college students' scholastic achievements? Has The Times, along with the rest of the media, reduced itself to making role models of wealthy-to-be athletes at the expense of promoting academics as a worthy goal of our youth?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008
It's always disappointing to read the architectural reviews in The Times because your reviewers don't seem to understand the bigger picture of Los Angeles ["No Time for Fancy Work -- Let's Get Local" by Christopher Hawthorne, Oct. 26]. After the Industrial Revolution, people moved to L.A. because they did not want Chicago, San Francisco or New York. They invented a new city, which is still what we are today. We are just experiencing growing pains. We now cannot have a big backyard for everybody, so L.A. will continue its "quick evolution."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Ten bucks here will buy you a chilled summer street treat of mushy pea sorbet with candied bacon and mint syrup. Then it's off to the opera for some bubble-gum Buddhist Busby Berkeley acrobatics. Second-city, easily overlooked, clearly insecure Manchester has just entered the festival racket. It's unlikely that this city will ever have the tourist appeal of such summer festival faves as Edinburgh, Salzburg or Aix-en-Provence.
OPINION
December 18, 2006
Re "Yangtze dolphin extinct, experts say," Dec. 14 Who is China trying to fool? It remains among the biggest polluters on the planet. In 2005, China was responsible for two of the largest major environmental disasters when separate chemical plant explosions pumped 100 tons of carcinogenic benzene and other toxic compounds into two major waterways, the Songhua and the Yangtze rivers. In pure Mao fashion, the Chinese government delayed alerting 360 million people affected by the spill for 10 days while it figured out what to do. Are we really to believe the quote from the Chinese scientist concerning the extinction of the 20-million-year-old dolphin species: "It did not appear that pollution was a culprit"?
BUSINESS
July 21, 2002
During the management tour of the unnamed shipping facility, industry consultant Frank Hanley "chuckled and shook his head" when at 11:30 a.m., the "noisy, outsized and frenetic" work scene ceased for lunch. According to "Making Waves on the Waterfront" [June 30], he "couldn't have asked for a better demonstration of the union's power." What's with the chuckle and the shaking of the head? What is he implying here? Is he opposed to these union members taking a lunch hour? Are they supposed to wait until "work slows down" before they have a meal?
OPINION
October 29, 2006 | Max Boot, Max Boot, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a weekly columnist for The Times, is the author of "War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History, 1500 to Today." mboot@latimescolumnists.com
GREAT POWERS cease to be great for many reasons. In addition to the causes frequently debated -- economics, culture, disease, geography -- there is an overarching trend. Over the last 500 years, the fate of nations has been increasingly tied to their success, or lack thereof, in harnessing revolutions in military affairs.
FOOD
March 22, 2006
RE Amy Scattergood's "Simplicity: Let it Rule" [March 15]: Back in the day, say the 14th through 19th centuries, written recipes generally were "one-liners." It was assumed anyone reading a cookbook knew how to cook and could flesh out the few broad brushstrokes of a recipe. If one cook's version varied from another's, that was the culinary equivalent of a personal thumbprint. As with today's cookbooks, that the recipe was written in the first place implied its author's thumbprint was better than yours or mine.
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