Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIndustry Policy
IN THE NEWS

Industry Policy

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 24, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Competition is getting rougher in the commercial jetliner business--which accounts for 2 million U.S. jobs--with most of the gains being made by Europe's government-owned Airbus Industrie. And that holds implications and lessons aplenty in this time of anxiety and argument over U.S. competitiveness. Airbus' success says that government aid to industry can be successful, and that Americans need to think about a new industrial policy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 31, 2009 | Peter Wallsten and Jim Tankersley
President Obama's plan to save failing U.S. automakers -- and make them the instruments for creating a cleaner, greener transportation system -- marked a major step across the line that traditionally separates government from private industry. His announcement Monday of a new position on bailing out Detroit went beyond a desire to be sure tax dollars were not wasted in bailing out struggling companies.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 12, 1985 | Harry Bernstein
President Reagan is such an ardent advocate of free enterprise and of getting the government off the backs of American workers and corporations that it seems almost ridiculous for a prominent economist to charge that "all of this small government-big government debate (led by Reagan) is bull." But that is the accusation made by Robert B. Reich, whose 1983 book about industrial strategy, "The Next American Frontier," was a best seller.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2002 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an overhaul of the Clean Air Act, the Bush administration proposed Thursday to relax rules that require a host of industries to strengthen pollution controls whenever they build new plants or expand old ones. The changes, announced by EPA Administrator Christie Whitman, have been long sought by power companies, chemical firms, paper mill operators and other major industries. In Congress, reaction from Democrats was swift and angry. Sen. James M. Jeffords (I-Vt.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2009 | Peter Wallsten and Jim Tankersley
President Obama's plan to save failing U.S. automakers -- and make them the instruments for creating a cleaner, greener transportation system -- marked a major step across the line that traditionally separates government from private industry. His announcement Monday of a new position on bailing out Detroit went beyond a desire to be sure tax dollars were not wasted in bailing out struggling companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1985 | RICHARD N. GOODWIN, Richard N. Goodwin, who was assistant special counsel to President Kennedy and special assistant to President Johnson, is now a writer and commentator in Concord, Mass.
Since it is more blessed to give than to receive, modern America must be counted among the most sanctified nations of the world. In a conversion equal to Ebenezer Scrooge's, we have embraced the spirit of Christmas giving in a fervor of benevolence that belies our earlier reputation as the stronghold of selfish materialism.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | AMY HARMON
President Clinton this week has called for closer collaboration between government and industry on several fronts. Here is an assessment of the President's proposals: AIRLINES THE PLAN: President Clinton has proposed the creation of a national commission to recommend ways to help the ailing U.S. airline industry. The panel likely would examine ways to help U.S.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | JAMES RISEN and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Detroit's Big Three auto makers had plenty of reasons to dread last fall's election of Bill Clinton. Not only was Clinton the first Democrat to make it to the White House in 12 years, but he and running mate Al Gore were committed to a strong environmental agenda that called for tougher fuel efficiency and auto pollution regulations.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1985 | CHRIS WELLES, Times Staff Writer
One day in August, 1982, Walter F. Mondale sat down to read the manuscript of a new book titled "Minding America's Business" by Ira C. Magaziner and Robert B. Reich, advocates of a new approach to federal industrial policy, which concerns the government's relationship with particular industrial sectors. "This," he remarked enthusiastically to his wife when he finished, "should do it for the Democrats in 1984." For a time, Mondale's comment seemed prophetic.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The airline business, in a word, is in crisis. And that's the good news, because a crisis may be just what's needed to bring about new structures and arrangements in the industry. A stronger airline business could emerge from today's troubles--but salvation will be neither quick nor easy. And first we're going to get high drama on the national stage. President Clinton met Monday at Boeing Co.'s Seattle headquarters with the heads of the major airlines to determine what the government could do.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration signaled Thursday it is leaning toward measures that would protect the beleaguered steel industry from foreign competition, a decision that could save U.S. jobs but hike the cost of a variety of goods. Officials said President Bush was sympathetic to the complaints of steelworkers and the major U.S. steel companies that low prices charged by foreign producers are undercutting them.
NEWS
May 19, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been 28 years since a company last ordered and built a nuclear power plant in the United States, but the nuclear industry has been quietly laying the groundwork for new growth. Its engineers have designed new reactors that they say are safer and cheaper to build. Regulators have streamlined a costly licensing process that often lasted beyond a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1994
None dare call it that, but the Clinton Administration is moving to establish an American industrial policy. Republicans have vowed to kill it if they gain control of Congress. So it is worth examining the Administration's efforts to redirect American technology in the post-Cold War era.
OPINION
October 3, 1993
Odd fellows indeed have joined in an amazing new venture. There was President Clinton with the heads of the Big Three auto makers, announcing a public/private partnership to usher in what they hope will be a new era in auto technology. The result could be a quantum leap in auto efficiency, manufacturing and global competitiveness. This is an alliance that inspires enthusiasm and hope.
NEWS
September 29, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step being compared to the Apollo project that put a man on the moon, President Clinton will announce today a partnership between the Big Three auto makers and the nation's defense laboratories to develop, within a decade, vehicles three times more fuel efficient than today's cars. The so-called "clean car" alliance, among the most wide-ranging collaborations ever between U.S.
NEWS
July 22, 1993 | JAMES RISEN and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Detroit's Big Three auto makers had plenty of reasons to dread last fall's election of Bill Clinton. Not only was Clinton the first Democrat to make it to the White House in 12 years, but he and running mate Al Gore were committed to a strong environmental agenda that called for tougher fuel efficiency and auto pollution regulations.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1985
Regarding "Protectionist Solutions to Trade Problem Are Easy, but Too Dangerous" (Viewpoints, July 21), Americans are indeed troubled by our horrendous trade deficit, which may reach $150 billion this year. Scarcely a day goes by without news of plants closing, transferring manufacturing operations--including jobs, of course--overseas. Nearly a third of our unemployment--about 3 million jobs--can be accounted for by the trade deficit. Unfortunately, any suggested approach to dealing with this issue immediately evokes the scare word "protectionism."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1992 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outgoing Greater San Diego Chamber of Commerce President Lee Grissom Thursday urged San Diego to take tough steps to revive an economy that has been buffeted by recession, defense-spending cuts, a slowdown in new construction and increased political bickering. Grissom, 49, the chamber's president for the past 17 years, leaves San Diego Saturday for Sacramento, where he will serve as deputy chief of staff for economic development for Gov. Pete Wilson, his longtime friend and mentor.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of the nation's airlines finally got a chance to meet with President Clinton to talk about what ails their industry and how to solve those problems. It was clear that the solutions will not come easily. In an hourlong round-table meeting at Boeing Co. offices near Seattle, Clinton on Monday heard a variety of often contrary points of view about what's wrong and what the government should do to help.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's proposal as part of his technology initiative to fund "clean car" research should enhance the Big Three's uphill efforts to produce viable low-emission vehicles by 1998, industry officials said Tuesday. "By government coming to the table, it further increases the possibility that it can be done," said Don Walkowicz, executive director of the U.S. Council for Automotive Research. USCAR oversees cooperative research by General Motors, Ford and Chrysler.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|