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Infant Formula

BUSINESS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The nation's top three makers of infant formula illegally conspired to drive up prices and keep other manufacturers out of the industry, Florida's attorney general charged in an antitrust suit today. Atty. Gen. Bob Butterworth filed a civil complaint in Tallahassee federal court against Abbott Laboratories of Abbott Park, Ill., American Home Products Corp. of New York City and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., also of New York City.
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BUSINESS
January 1, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission has subpoenaed documents at the nation's major infant-formula makers and a pediatricians group as part of its probe of possible anti-competitive practices in the industry. Federal officials are investigating, among other things, charges of price fixing and a voluntary ban on consumer advertising that is supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics, one of the groups subpoenaed.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to boost disappointing sales of its infant formula, Carnation Co. says it will begin advertising the product directly to mothers next month in a controversial strategy that has been opposed by pediatrician groups and advocates of breast feeding. Until recently, infant formula makers had advertised only to health professionals in medical journals under guidelines approved by the influential American Academy of Pediatrics.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1990 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Trade Commission said Tuesday that it has opened a preliminary investigation of the infant formula business to determine whether a lack of competition has artificially raised prices. The FTC responded to a complaint from Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum (D-Ohio), who said: "American women may be paying millions of dollars more than they should for infant formula because there is no competition." And that, he said, results from "an alarming pattern of lock-step pricing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a public outcry and increasing political pressure, state health officials on Friday reversed course and rescinded an order barring thousands of needy infants from a federally funded food nutrition program. Local directors of the Women, Infants and Children Supplemental Food Program (WIC) expressed relief at the decision but said they will hold off enrolling new infants into the program until June.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1990
It never ceases to amaze me that infant formula is still considered to be an ideal gift for a new baby. I am referring to your article (Jan. 1) regarding the New Year's baby born at Fountain Valley Regional Hospital and Medical Center. In light of all the research about breast milk being the far superior infant food, I cannot believe that hospitals still insist on being free advertisements for the formula companies! The money used to buy the New Year's baby four weeks' worth of formula could have been much better spent on the services of a lactation consultant for the new mother.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
Baby foods maker Gerber Products said Thursday that it has teamed up with the pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers to introduce an infant formula that will be advertised directly to parents--a controversial strategy opposed by a pediatricians' group. Most infant formulas are advertised only to medical professionals under guidelines approved by advocates of breast-feeding and the powerful American Academy of Pediatrics, which on Thursday voiced its opposition to the Gerber plan. The groups say that advertising directly to mothers may discourage breast-feeding, and last year, the academy and others opposed a similar marketing method that Los Angeles-based Carnation Co. used to market a new formula product.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1989 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Carnation Co., under fire for using an infant formula label that has been called misleading, on Friday said it will remove the term "hypo-allergenic" from its Good Start H.A. product. Carnation said the label change, which will be effective in April, is being made to eliminate potential consumer confusion about the word "hypo-allergenic," which means reduced potential for allergic reaction. "Carnation Good Start H.A.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration has asked Carnation Co. to submit new data to substantiate the claims that its new infant formula is less likely to trigger allergies after the agency found flaws in the company's original research. The questions surrounding the Carnation product, called Good Start, has led the FDA to request information from the makers of other formulas that also claim to reduce the chances of allergic reaction to cow's milk.
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