Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInfants
IN THE NEWS

Infants

SPORTS
July 31, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
LONDON - Jamel Herring waited more than 10 years for his chance to get in an Olympic boxing ring. Once he was there, however, his stay proved agonizingly short, as he lasted only three one-sided rounds against Daniyar Yeleussinov of Kazakhstan, who won their opening round light-welterweight bout, 19-9, Tuesday. But although he may have lost the fight, Herring didn't lose his perspective. War, it seems, has a way of doing that to a person. "It's not the end of the world," he said, tugging at his dark blue boxing trunks.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
July 19, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The United States is on track to have the highest number of whooping cough cases since 1959, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. Already, there have been nearly 18,000 cases of the disease, formally known as pertussis, reported nationwide this year, more than twice as many as at this point in 2011, said Dr. Anne Schuchat, director of CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. There have been nine deaths so far, all of them in infants. In 2010, there were more than 27,000 cases and 27 deaths, 25 of them in infants.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Fido the dog and Ginger the cat need not worry about being replaced by a new baby - in fact, they could be helping parents raise healthier children. A new study finds that children who lived with dogs or cats during their first year of life got sick less frequently than kids from pet-free zones. The study, published in Monday's edition of the journal Pediatrics, provides fresh evidence for the counterintuitive notion that an overly clean environment may not be ideal for babies.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
With the constant drumbeat of reminders to put sunscreen on your skin, it might be confusing to consider what to do about that especially vulnerable skin of an infant. The U.S. Food and Drug Administrationrecommends that, generally, babies younger than 6 months old should not have sunscreen put on their skin. "The best approach is to keep infants under 6 months out of the sun, and to avoid exposure to the sun in the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when ultraviolet (UV)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2012 | By Angel Jennings and Andrew Blankstein
Prosecutors plan to charge a teen with murder, accusing him of firing into a crowd in Watts this month and killing a 1-year-old boy cradled in his father's arms, authorities said Thursday. Los Angeles police describe the 15-year-old suspect, Donald Ray Dokins, as a Fudgetown Mafia Crips gang member. Prosecutors plan to charge Dokins as an adult with one count each of first-degree murder and attempted murder. The arraignment is scheduled for Friday morning. Dokins was taken into custody Wednesday after LAPD detectives obtained information linking him to the June 4 shooting that killed Angel Mauro Cortez Nava and wounded the child's father, Mauro Cortez, according to court documents and law enforcement sources familiar with the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2012 | Hector Tobar
Los Angeles Times People like Ana Venegas are said to be living "in the shadows. " It's the most annoying of all the metaphors in the immigration debate. And woefully inaccurate. Venegas, 23, entered this country illegally as a 10-month-old baby carried across the Mexico-U.S. border by her teenage mother. She's never been able to legalize her status. That makes her "undocumented," if you're someone sympathetic to her plight. And an "illegal" if you're not. But whatever you want to call her, the one thing you can't say about Ana is that she's been hiding.
SCIENCE
June 15, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
In an attempt to replicate the early experiences of infants, researchers in England have created a robot that can learn simple words in minutes just by having a conversation with a person. The work, published this week in the journal PLoS One, offers insight into how babies transition from babbling to speaking their first words. The 3-foot-tall robot, named DeeChee, was built to produce any syllable in the English language. But it knew no words at the outset of the study, speaking only babble phrases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
In 2005, leaders of a gang that sold crack and other drugs near MacArthur Park decided to add a new business venture: extorting the vendors who crowd the streets each evening, selling clothes, pirated DVDs and electronics to supplement a hardscrabble existence. The new effort led to a bloody consequence in September 2007, when an 18-year-old tasked with gunning down a defiant vendor accidentally shot to death a 3-week-old infant. The baby's death triggered a large-scale crackdown on the clique that culminated with a two-month trial that began in March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
I do not know what clothes I was wearing. Whether I'd been left in a cradle or with any note of explanation. I do not know if I cried or lay still. Looked around or slept. Minutes may have gone by. Or hours. All the official record says is that, at about 2 months old, I was abandoned at the Nambu police station in Busan, South Korea. Labeled a "foundling," I was taken to a countryside orphanage and given a birth date and a name -- Dong Hee Ahn. It was 1978. After a year and a half, I was transferred to a foster home in Seoul, where a social worker noted: Her all action development progress was slower than same aged children due to being cared at orphanage for long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Diego -- An attorney who once was prominent in adoption circles was sentenced Friday to five months in federal custody and nine months of home confinement for her guilty plea in what prosecutors called an international "baby-selling" ring. Theresa Erickson, whose law firm was in Poway, had pleaded guilty to wire fraud for her role in a scheme that involved hiring surrogates to carry embryos to term and then arranging for the infants to be adopted. The "intended parents" often paid more than $100,000, according to the plea bargain signed by Erickson.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|