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Infections

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1988 | Compiled from staff and wire reports
A bacterial infection may be a primary cause of extremely premature births, researchers report, a finding that could lead to new ways to prevent the dangerous deliveries. "We're very excited about these findings. The prematurity rate in this country hasn't really decreased in the last 40 years," said Sharon L. Hillier, a research assistant professor at the University of Washington in Seattle.
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NEWS
March 14, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Knootka, one of Sea World's three adult killer whales, died Tuesday after a four-month battle with a rare fungous infection, Sea World officials said. "It appears Knootka was overwhelmed with the infections," said Dr. Jim McBain, Sea World staff veterinarian. Knootka, who weighed 8,500 pounds, is the third killer whale to die at the private marine park in 18 months. In August, 1988, just three days after the birth of Baby Shamu, the baby's father, Orky, died of old age, park officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1987 | TED ROHRLICH and ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Staff Writers
Sheriff Sherman Block Thursday denied reports from some county health department physicians that an apparent cluster of a deadly bacterial infection had been found at the Los Angeles Central Jail. "A serious problem with infectious disease does not exist" at any of the county's jails, Block said. The sheriff acknowledged that 12 cases of meningococcal infections had been diagnosed among inmates in 1986 and that one inmate had died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1998 | STEVE CARNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What started as a twisted ankle Sunday has turned into a fight for survival for a 30-year-old Anaheim women stricken by so-called flesh-eating bacteria. Doctors at Anaheim Memorial Medical Center have amputated both of Ana Maria Garcia's legs and part of her right hand to try to halt the spread of the virulent infection, called necrotizing fasciitis. She was in extremely critical condition, a hospital spokeswoman said.
WORLD
October 12, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
British health authorities have blamed the deaths of at least 90 people on a virulent bacterial infection that swept through three hospitals in south-central England, where patients allegedly were forced to defecate in their beds and wait for hours for clean sheets.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Microbes in the wrong place at the wrong time -- a woman's amniotic fluid during pregnancy -- may play a role in causing premature births, according to a study published in the online journal PLoS ONE. Using sensitive molecular techniques, researchers found a greater quantity and variety of bacteria and fungi in a significant portion of women who gave birth prematurely. The more severe the infection, the earlier the women were likely to give birth. The amniotic sac, which surrounds a fetus, has long been considered a protected, almost inviolable, site.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An experimental antibiotic may prevent or delay the onset of a life-threatening and difficult-to-treat infection that afflicts thousands of AIDS patients, according to previously confidential data made available to The Times. A recently completed study of 590 AIDS patients has shown that the drug, rifabutin, can nearly cut in half the rate at which patients develop the infection, which is known as Mycobacterium avium complex, or MAC.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A congressional hearing on legislation that would commit nearly $1.5 billion to the treatment of early-stage AIDS infections next year erupted Thursday into a debate over a proposal to require doctors to report the names of infected patients to health authorities. On opposite sides of the issue were Rep. William E. Dannemeyer (R-Fullerton), who supports mandatory reporting of patients infected with the AIDS virus, and Rep. Henry A.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Longshoreman Buck Helm, who lived for more than a month after being trapped for days amid the collapsed Nimitz Freeway, probably died from widespread infection and the stress it placed on an already diseased heart, his doctor said Monday. Helm's death Saturday shocked the medical staff because he appeared to be improving last week, said Dr. Tom McDonald, chief of surgery at Oakland's Kaiser Permanente Medical Center. But Helm broke into a fever Thursday, suggesting that he had an infection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
In front of the media Friday, Bernie Donner was witty and upbeat. When the cameras turned, though, the emotions came. "Thank you for saving my life," he whispered in a choked-up voice, wrapping his arms around internal medicine specialist Dr. Peter Miao.
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