Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInfections
IN THE NEWS

Infections

NEWS
November 21, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Longshoreman Buck Helm, who lived for more than a month after being trapped for days amid the collapsed Nimitz Freeway, probably died from widespread infection and the stress it placed on an already diseased heart, his doctor said Monday. Helm's death Saturday shocked the medical staff because he appeared to be improving last week, said Dr. Tom McDonald, chief of surgery at Oakland's Kaiser Permanente Medical Center. But Helm broke into a fever Thursday, suggesting that he had an infection.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
In front of the media Friday, Bernie Donner was witty and upbeat. When the cameras turned, though, the emotions came. "Thank you for saving my life," he whispered in a choked-up voice, wrapping his arms around internal medicine specialist Dr. Peter Miao.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Despite a historic drop in AIDS cases and deaths in the U.S. in the last few years, the rate at which people are becoming infected with HIV has held relatively steady, the government said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said that many people are not heeding warnings about unsafe sex and drug use.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
Kraft Foods Inc. said Chief Executive Roger Deromedi has been suffering from a viral infection but will return to work May 10 -- ending the company's two-week silence on his previously undisclosed illness and condition. The nation's largest food company did not explain why it had chosen to keep the details surrounding the hospitalization of its 50-year-old CEO such a tightly held secret for so long despite calls by investors to release more information.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The medical odyssey of 14-year-old Jeff Thornton, who died after developing gangrene from frostbite, is a testament to how exposure to severe cold can lead to infection. Exposure to cold shrinks blood vessels in the feet and hands, pinching off circulation and leaving the limbs without enough blood flow to fight infection in those areas. Tissues also die because of the lack of blood, providing a fertile breeding ground for bacteria.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rather than endorse mandatory restrictions, federal officials appear likely to recommend that AIDS-infected health care professionals voluntarily refrain from performing surgery and other invasive procedures or seek expert advice before continuing to do so.
NATIONAL
June 30, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A woman pleaded guilty to causing the death of her 15-month-old son, whose severe diaper rash led to a fatal infection. Amy Livingston, 27, pleaded guilty in Ebensburg to involuntary manslaughter in the boy's death and to child endangerment for not treating a rash on another son. Her son Harley died in December of sepsis and dehydration. His brother, Hunter, 4, was successfully treated. Doctors testified at a preliminary hearing that the baby could have survived with basic care.
NEWS
January 1, 1988 | United Press International
Although some medical authorities have said the chances of contracting an AIDS virus infection after one sexual encounter with a virus carrier are low, new research indicates that it can happen, government scientists reported Thursday. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control were puzzled by the findings, which they said suggested that sexual behavior alone does not explain heterosexual transmission of HIV, the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Stanford scientists have made a major advance in AIDS research by transmitting the disease to mice that have a human immune system. The infected mice, experts said, promise to be valuable tools for studying the development of AIDS as well as for testing new drugs and vaccines. The production of mice with human immune systems was announced only three months ago, after the Stanford scientists had implanted fetal human immune tissues into a special strain of immune-deficient mice.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The number of health-care workers accidentally infected with the AIDS virus is rising, researchers reported here Friday, while the possibility of using drugs such as AZT to protect them remains in question. Thirty-four cases of occupationally acquired AIDS virus infection have been reported to federal health officials. New studies indicate that many health-care workers are not routinely taking recommended steps to avoid exposure to patients' blood.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|