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BUSINESS
December 19, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Imagine Joe Isuzu, flute in hand, seated on some big boulder. Suddenly, an off-camera voice oh-so-softly whispers Zen-like thoughts of nature. Last week, Isuzu's agency seriously considered making this ad to parody those nature-filled commercials by rival car maker Infiniti. The firm finally decided not to. That it even considered creating the parody ad indicates how quickly this highly unusual Infiniti campaign has entered the American psyche.
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AUTOS
November 1, 2006 | DAN NEIL
THE metal trim around the cabin, Infiniti informs us, is textured like that of washi, fine Japanese rice paper. The slats of the grille are meant to resemble the fierce edges of samurai swords, although the multiple blades are less suggestive of the Edo period than of the Schick Dynasty. And if you go to the Infiniti website, which extols the sculptural virtues of the 2007 G35 sedan, the first thing you'll see is a calligraphy brush, tumid with red paint, tracing a perfect curve.
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BUSINESS
December 28, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sticks and stones may break your bones, but dealers of Infiniti luxury cars question whether they sell cars very well. In meetings earlier this month, the dealers complained about the company's Zen-like series of advertisements featuring peaceful woods, rock gardens and placid lakes--but precious few shots of the mysterious auto. Partly as a result, Nissan Motor Corp.'
AUTOS
April 20, 2005 | DAN NEIL
As proof that all technology is political, consider the 2006 Infiniti M45 Sport, bristling with electronic safety aids that, taken together, amount to the first stirrings of the automotive Nanny State. Most notable is Lane Departure Warning (LDW).
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990
Instead of trying to define "obscenity" for the NEA controversy, why don't we try to define what is "art." Perhaps we could borrow George Bernard Shaw's definition of what is "theater": "A place for the exaltation of the human spirit and a haven from gloom and despair." BEVERLY KRAMER Los Angeles
AUTOS
November 1, 2006 | DAN NEIL
THE metal trim around the cabin, Infiniti informs us, is textured like that of washi, fine Japanese rice paper. The slats of the grille are meant to resemble the fierce edges of samurai swords, although the multiple blades are less suggestive of the Edo period than of the Schick Dynasty. And if you go to the Infiniti website, which extols the sculptural virtues of the 2007 G35 sedan, the first thing you'll see is a calligraphy brush, tumid with red paint, tracing a perfect curve.
AUTOS
April 20, 2005 | DAN NEIL
As proof that all technology is political, consider the 2006 Infiniti M45 Sport, bristling with electronic safety aids that, taken together, amount to the first stirrings of the automotive Nanny State. Most notable is Lane Departure Warning (LDW).
BUSINESS
April 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
Luxury carmaker Infiniti will begin offering lane-departure warning systems in vehicles later this year, the first use of such accident-avoidance technology in North American passenger cars, the Nissan Motor Co. division said. Employing a small camera, speed sensor and warning buzzer, the system is designed to alert drivers of unintentional movement out of a designated traffic lane.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nissan's Infiniti division evidently thinks "money talks." The company on Monday unveiled a billboard covered with $30,000 in cash, a splashy promotion for its new I-30 luxury sedan. The billboard, on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, is plastered with $1, $5 and $100 bills custom-ordered from the Treasury Department and protected round-the-clock by two armed security guards. The $30,000 represents the price of the car, give or take a few hundred dollars.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
Luxury carmaker Infiniti will begin offering lane-departure warning systems in vehicles later this year, the first use of such accident-avoidance technology in North American passenger cars, the Nissan Motor Co. division said. Employing a small camera, speed sensor and warning buzzer, the system is designed to alert drivers of unintentional movement out of a designated traffic lane.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nissan's Infiniti division evidently thinks "money talks." The company on Monday unveiled a billboard covered with $30,000 in cash, a splashy promotion for its new I-30 luxury sedan. The billboard, on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, is plastered with $1, $5 and $100 bills custom-ordered from the Treasury Department and protected round-the-clock by two armed security guards. The $30,000 represents the price of the car, give or take a few hundred dollars.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990
Instead of trying to define "obscenity" for the NEA controversy, why don't we try to define what is "art." Perhaps we could borrow George Bernard Shaw's definition of what is "theater": "A place for the exaltation of the human spirit and a haven from gloom and despair." BEVERLY KRAMER Los Angeles
BUSINESS
April 12, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedian Jay Leno perhaps put it best: Infiniti may not be doing so well, but, hey, at least sales of rocks and trees are skyrocketing. After five months on the American market, Nissan's Infiniti luxury car line--which has relied on a controversial advertising campaign that showed more scenes of nature than scenes of automobiles--is posting surprisingly weak sales.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sticks and stones may break your bones, but dealers of Infiniti luxury cars question whether they sell cars very well. In meetings earlier this month, the dealers complained about the company's Zen-like series of advertisements featuring peaceful woods, rock gardens and placid lakes--but precious few shots of the mysterious auto. Partly as a result, Nissan Motor Corp.'
BUSINESS
December 19, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Imagine Joe Isuzu, flute in hand, seated on some big boulder. Suddenly, an off-camera voice oh-so-softly whispers Zen-like thoughts of nature. Last week, Isuzu's agency seriously considered making this ad to parody those nature-filled commercials by rival car maker Infiniti. The firm finally decided not to. That it even considered creating the parody ad indicates how quickly this highly unusual Infiniti campaign has entered the American psyche.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Comedian Jay Leno perhaps put it best: Infiniti may not be doing so well, but, hey, at least sales of rocks and trees are skyrocketing. After five months on the American market, Nissan's Infiniti luxury car line--which has relied on a controversial advertising campaign that showed more scenes of nature than scenes of automobiles--is posting surprisingly weak sales.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Most of us are suckers for free stuff. We'll fly more costly flights just to earn frequent-flyer miles on our favorite airlines. We'll stay at certain hotel chains that lure us with the prospect of earning free lodging. We'll even rent one brand of car over another just because one rental agency doles out free tote bags. What happens, however, when some clever marketer waves 20 free Corvettes in the public's face?
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