Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInflammation
IN THE NEWS

Inflammation

BUSINESS
September 16, 1997 | BARBARA MURPHY
Amgen has announced that it will seek a corporate partner for its ongoing inflammation research and development program, headquartered in Boulder, Colo., to ensure that the program's potential is realized. As part of the plan, Amgen's Boulder unit will be reorganized into a stand-alone inflammation research and development company with a number of potential products in preclinical development. Three of the products have been studied in humans.
Advertisement
HEALTH
November 22, 2004 | From Reuters
Children with autism have inflammation in their brains, researchers have found, although it is not clear whether the inflammation causes the condition. Tests on the brain tissue of 11 patients with autism who had died and on spinal fluid from six living children with autism showed the activation of immune system responses, reported a team at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and the University of Milan.
HEALTH
July 31, 2000 | DENISE HAMILTON
Dr. Stephan Targan is a professor of medicine at UCLA and director of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's gastroenterology division and its inflammatory bowel disease center. He spoke to Health about Crohn's, a debilitating disease that affects between 400,000 to 750,000 Americans and is on the rise. Question: What is Crohn's, and why are we seeing more of it today than ever before? Answer: Crohn's is a chronic inflammation of the intestine that causes people to have diarrhea, pain and weight loss.
SPORTS
September 25, 1985 | MIKE DOWNEY
Ed Whitson is supposed to pitch for the New York Yankees Friday night, and I am picturing a funny scene. Whitson gets bombed in the first inning. Billy Martin comes out of the dugout to take the pitcher out of the game. Whitson does not want to come out. Martin punches him in the eye. Whitson kicks Martin in the leg. Martin kicks dirt on Whitson. Whitson throws the resin bag at Martin. The rest of the Yankees break up the fight. Order is restored.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Practicing yoga for at least three hours a week for three months reduced the fatigue and inflammation in breast cancer survivors, compared with survivors who did no yoga, researchers reported. And the more yoga, the greater the change, the researchers, from the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, said. At six months - three months after the formal yoga had ended - fatigue was 57% lower in the women who had done yoga, compared with those who had not. Inflammation, measured  by blood tests, was reduced by up to 20%, the researchers said.
NEWS
December 23, 1988 | NEIL FEINEMAN
If the men in your life are into outdoor sports, Christmas gift-giving just got easier. Until recently, says Douglas Brooks, author of "Going Solo: The Art of Personal Training" (Power Books, 1988), exercise fashion was limited to uniforms. But "uniforms don't flatter or make anyone feel special." And most people don't feel good about working out until they look good. For that reason, he continues, men involved in outdoor sports are now eager to make a fashion statement.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Ginger root supplements may help tamp down markers for colon inflammation, a study finds. The study, published online Tuesday in the journal Cancer Prevention Research , included 30 men and women who were randomly assigned to take 2 grams of a ginger root supplement or a placebo for 28 days. The participants were at normal risk for colon cancer -- they had no family history of the disease and no evidence of the disease. Ginger root is a popular supplement that's often used to treat stomach ailments.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | From Associated Press
A vaccine for tuberculosis is now being used to treat early, potentially aggressive cancers of the lining of the bladder. These superficial, or shallow, cancers can progress to invasive forms that burrow into the bladder muscle and then spread to other parts of the body, becoming incurable.
HEALTH
August 4, 2008 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Sure, smoking is bad for you -- but what happens when you combine it with something really good -- like running eight miles a day? Do you get a healthier smoker? Or an unhealthy athlete? It's one of those is-the-cigarette-half-smoked-or-half-unsmoked conundrums. And there's no definitive answer. "If people can quit, that's the best thing," says Dr. Robert Sallis, director of sports medicine at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Fontana.
HEALTH
November 8, 2004 | Elena Conis
The impressive pau d'arco tree of the Central and South American rain forests grows to well over 100 feet tall, with a trunk that can reach 6 feet wide. Known by the scientific names Tabebuia avellanedae and Tabebuia impetiginosa, it was named pau d'arco, or bow stick, by Portuguese colonists centuries ago in Brazil. The Inca used the bark to make healing tonics, and natives of the Brazilian rainforest have used the hardwood to make boats and weapons.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|