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Information Overload

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OPINION
April 11, 2010
Newspaper cartoonists cruise the information highway, littering its shoulders and driving home their points. Nate Beeler copped the attitude that the feds aren't even close when it comes to policing cyber-spacecraft. Rob Rogers questioned the greenness of the latest paperless gadget. Count Steve Kelley among those considering skipping Uncle Sam's paperwork. OK, maybe the census, but sharpen your pencils Steve, it's income tax week. Now where's that Form 1040? -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Tony Cokes' short videos, currently on view at REDCAT, expose the hypocrisy of consumer culture, the navel-gazing of the art world and the malfeasance of American politics. But they are a hard sell, often composed of little more than screen after screen of text set to music, and if you're lucky, some heavily processed images.  It's as if Cokes hit on a formula in the late 1980s and never looked back, filling his works with lengthy lists of facts, quotes and musings. The REDCAT exhibition includes 45 works from the last decade or so, divided into eight themed groups.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2010 | By Richard Evans
Executives everywhere struggle with the mass of responsibilities, projects, reports and meetings that add up to information overload. The only option, they reason, is to multitask. There is just one problem with that approach, writes Douglas Merrill, former chief information officer at Google Inc.: It doesn't work. With a PhD in psychology and cognitive sciences, Merrill has the credentials to tell us how the brain functions in a stressful business environment and how to organize our thought processes for success.
SPORTS
May 1, 2012 | By Mark Medina
There were smiles all around the Lakers' practice facility. Andrew Bynum marveled at his triple-double performance in the Lakers' 103-88 Game 1 victory over the Denver Nuggets where he set a Laker playoff record and tied an NBA playoff record with 10 blocked shots. Pau Gasol joked that Bynum remained so effective he took away at least one of his blocks. And Kobe Bryant heaped praise on Bynum's blocking effort by offering a not-so-subtle dig at a former Lakers' center. "It was the most enjoyable one," Bryant said regarding Bynum's 10-block performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Sharon Mizota
Tony Cokes' short videos, currently on view at REDCAT, expose the hypocrisy of consumer culture, the navel-gazing of the art world and the malfeasance of American politics. But they are a hard sell, often composed of little more than screen after screen of text set to music, and if you're lucky, some heavily processed images.  It's as if Cokes hit on a formula in the late 1980s and never looked back, filling his works with lengthy lists of facts, quotes and musings. The REDCAT exhibition includes 45 works from the last decade or so, divided into eight themed groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | ROBERT F. ERBURU, Robert F. Erburu is chairman of the Times Mirror Co. This is adapted from his commencement address this spring at Loyola Marymount University. and
It is difficult to shrug off what author Richard Saul Wurman called "information anxiety." He defined it as the gap between what we understand and what we think we should understand. Driven by uncertainty and guilt, we allow ourselves to be inundated with information. As a result of this overload, he says, "We read without comprehending, see without perceiving, hear without listening." Isn't there a time for silence as well as sound?
OPINION
July 25, 2010 | By William Powers
What are you doing on your summer vacation? Relaxing at the beach? Enjoying friends and family? Or are you checking your smartphone every five minutes? It's the essential predicament of the Digital Age. Even on vacation. It's tempting to blame our tools, the BlackBerrys and the iPhones that keep us so connected and busy. But the real problem isn't the technologies; it's us. We've convinced ourselves that the more connected we are, the better. We never give ourselves a break.
OPINION
July 25, 2010 | By William Powers
What are you doing on your summer vacation? Relaxing at the beach? Enjoying friends and family? Or are you checking your smartphone every five minutes? It's the essential predicament of the Digital Age. Even on vacation. It's tempting to blame our tools, the BlackBerrys and the iPhones that keep us so connected and busy. But the real problem isn't the technologies; it's us. We've convinced ourselves that the more connected we are, the better. We never give ourselves a break.
HOME & GARDEN
July 10, 2010 | Deborah Netburn
Sleep consultant and "new parent mentor" Vonda Dennis' clients like to say that she carries magic pixie dust in her pockets. How else to explain a screaming baby so quickly settling to sleep in her arms? But Dennis says a lot of what she does to quiet a baby is simply common sense. "Most of what I tell my clients sounds really reasonable, and a lot of it is basic logic that parents have, but just aren't pulling from," she said. In her postnatal mentoring sessions, Dennis focuses on "Believing in Yourself" and "Instinct Training" as well as sleep training and relaxation.
OPINION
April 11, 2010
Newspaper cartoonists cruise the information highway, littering its shoulders and driving home their points. Nate Beeler copped the attitude that the feds aren't even close when it comes to policing cyber-spacecraft. Rob Rogers questioned the greenness of the latest paperless gadget. Count Steve Kelley among those considering skipping Uncle Sam's paperwork. OK, maybe the census, but sharpen your pencils Steve, it's income tax week. Now where's that Form 1040? -- Joel Pett Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist at the Lexington Herald-Leader in Kentucky.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2010 | By Richard Evans
Executives everywhere struggle with the mass of responsibilities, projects, reports and meetings that add up to information overload. The only option, they reason, is to multitask. There is just one problem with that approach, writes Douglas Merrill, former chief information officer at Google Inc.: It doesn't work. With a PhD in psychology and cognitive sciences, Merrill has the credentials to tell us how the brain functions in a stressful business environment and how to organize our thought processes for success.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2009 | Hugh Hart
"This year alone, more data will be generated than in the cumulative history of humanity," says Dan Goods. "Stuff is being collected in all sorts of interesting forms and piling up somewhere. What do we do with it?" It's an apt question for the Too Much Information Age, and to address the query, Goods and co-curator David Delgado have rounded up a collection of geek-friendly installations on display through April 12 at Pasadena Museum of California Art's "Data + Art" exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2008 | Leslie Brenner, Times Staff Writer
It happened with cigarettes. It happened with red meat. And carbs. And SUVs. And now it's happening with e-mail. The preferred communication channel of millions of Americans is no longer cool. According to a growing number of academics, "technologists" and psychologists, our dependence on e-mail -- the need to attend to a constantly beeping in-box -- is creating anxiety in the workplace, adversely affecting the ability to focus, diminishing productivity and threatening family bonds.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2008 | Maria L. La Ganga and Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writers
It's not often you see a presidential candidate stumped on the stump. But there was Sen. Barack Obama, fielding questions in yet another rural high school, when an Iowan stood up to ask about something that weighed on her mind: "What does your logo stand for?" "Oh, that logo, that's easy," the senator from Illinois began, turning to ponder the O-shaped symbol with the red-and-white stripes across the bottom. "This is . . . " A pause. "Well, first of all, I didn't really design it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2004 | Blaine Harden, Washington Post
"The pace of life feels morally dangerous to me," Richard Ford, the novelist, wrote six years ago. It has only gotten worse since then, complains David M. Levy, a victim of information overload who is also a computer scientist at the University of Washington's Information School. Levy is all but helpless, he says, when new e-mail arrives. He feels obliged to open it. He is similarly hooked on the news, images and nonsense that spill out of the Internet.
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