Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInformation Services Industry
IN THE NEWS

Information Services Industry

NEWS
March 14, 2001 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The blame for the horrific plunge in technology stocks over the last year can be laid partly at the door of companies such as 21st Century Insurance. The Woodland Hills-based firm spent the last three years developing a Web site and a pair of sophisticated telephone call centers-- and, in the process, boosted its spending on technology equipment by a heaping 30% to 40% annually.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 6, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversial song-swapping service Napster Inc. began blocking access to thousands of copyrighted songs this weekend, but users quickly discovered that the company's filtering program is full of holes and that most songs are still available. Just hours after the blocking program was put into place, Napster subscribers began saving their MP3 music files with slightly misspelled song titles and band names to circumvent the company's attempt to police itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Programs that train students for careers in the Internet and entertainment trades are exploding at the state's community colleges, soaring from just a handful four years ago to 112 today. Commonly called "new media" or "media arts" education, the programs also go by such labels as "multimedia," "entertainment technology," "digital media" and "electronic media." They vary from one-year vocational certificate programs to two-year degree programs that prepare students for transfer to universities.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2001 | Liz Pulliam Weston
The Internal Revenue Service is unveiling a new Web site today designed to help small-business owners and the self-employed get a grip on their taxes. The site at http://www.irs.gov/smallbiz includes such features as a tutorial on creating business plans, suggestions on finding start-up financing and links to news and articles from trade magazines and other government Web sites.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bolstered by its recent court win over Napster Inc., the Recording Industry Assn. of America is targeting the music-pirating underground, sending out legal notices to halt a slew of Napster copycats. The record labels' leading trade group started mailing dozens of cease-and-desist letters this week to Internet service providers, such as Time Warner Cable, whose customers are using high-speed connections to swap copyrighted music.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2001 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The record industry has argued that Napster is siphoning off sales, and now it claims to have fresh evidence to back up that charge. Shipments of singles, the format that once provided the engine for the music business, plummeted last year as the industry turned up the heat in its court battle with Napster and landed a major blow to the file-sharing service in federal court. Shipments of CD singles slid 38.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month after completing the biggest merger in U.S. history, AOL Time Warner finds itself walking a tightrope on Internet privacy, with strong forces pulling the company in opposite directions.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the opening scene of the short film "The Kiss," the camera slowly pans up the blacktop to reveal actor Bernard Zilinskas sunning himself bare-chested on the hood of his car. Buff young Zilinskas may have the lead role, but it was the car that got the film green-lighted. That's because the film was approved and financed by Ford Motor Co., and the car, not coincidentally, is a Ford Focus.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2001 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Venture capital investments into Southland companies declined during the last three months of 2000 from the previous quarter, just as venture investing nationwide dropped, according to Venture Economics, a data service. Still, even as the number of dot-com company casualties piled up across the country, many Internet-related firms continued to get funding in Southern California and nationwide.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2001 | Associated Press
Americans' increasing need to get online helped boost revenue for the economy's information services sector to $776 billion in 1999, a 12% increase from the previous year, the Census Bureau said. Revenue from online information services increased 65% to $19 billion in 1999, the most recent data available, the agency said. Revenue for Internet access fees alone jumped 63% to $9 billion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|