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NEWS
February 6, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an unexpected consequence of a gun control law that took effect Jan. 1, the names of people admitted for mental health treatment at California hospitals are being recorded in state law enforcement computers. Although meant to keep firearms away from those who are considered dangerous to themselves or to society, the practice also applies to psychiatric patients who voluntarily check themselves in for treatment and have no history of violent behavior.
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BUSINESS
September 10, 2008 | Jessica Guynn
Bowing to pressure from privacy watchdogs and regulators, Google Inc. said it would shorten the length of time it retained consumer data, making those records anonymous after nine months rather than 18. Google used to keep logs of all search queries connected to Internet protocol addresses, the unique address assigned to each Internet connected device, indefinitely. In March 2007, the company began making those queries anonymous after 18 months. But the move didn't appease privacy groups or European regulators increasingly nervous about Google's growing dominance on the Internet.
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BUSINESS
February 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Google Inc. unveiled a plan to help U.S. patients gain control of their medical records and is working with doctors' groups, pharmacies and labs to help them securely share sensitive health data. The password-protected Web service stores health records on Google computers, with a medical services directory that lets users import doctors' records, drug history and test results.
NEWS
March 28, 1989
Losses from computer crime now total more than $555 million a year in the United States, according to a survey of computer centers and law officials. But the National Center for Computer Crime Data, which conducted the survey, also found that a very small percentage of computer crimes are reported to law-enforcement agencies and even fewer are prosecuted. Of 485 serious security incidents reported in 1988, the Los Angeles-based center found that only 6% resulted in criminal prosecutions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
For 40 years, historian Gladys Cox Hansen has labored in solitary obscurity among the dusty documents and yellowed newspaper clippings. She's a death scholar of sorts, on a determined quest to honor forgotten victims of this city's defining natural disaster. Hansen is compiling a first-ever register of those who died in the devastating 1906 earthquake and three-day firestorm that left much of this turn-of-the-century cultural and financial mecca in ruins, leveling 90% of the city's structures.
NEWS
July 14, 1997 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As state officials plan to expand a database containing the names and photographs of reputed gang members, a state arm of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and the American Civil Liberties Union are questioning whether minorities in Orange County are being unfairly targeted by the project.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1991 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TRW Inc., in two suits filed Tuesday, said federal law prohibits attorneys general in six states from bringing legal action against its besieged consumer credit business. The company named as defendants the attorneys general of New York and Texas. TRW, one of the nation's largest credit agencies, said it meets "not only the letter but the spirit" of the law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inheriting a Police Department with a woefully antiquated record-keeping system that wastes thousands of patrol hours each week and shrinking city coffers that make solutions difficult to afford, Mayor Richard Riordan faced a quandary: how to keep his campaign promise to modernize the Los Angeles Police Department and get more officers on the street? Riordan, the millionaire businessman, turned to his well-connected friends in the corporate world.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm lonely and so I thought of you," began the bizarre message on a Halloween card sent last fall to a 22-year-old woman at her home in Manteca. The message ended chillingly: "I'll give you one week to respond or I come looking for you." The writer was a stranger who had located the woman from her car license plate with help from Department of Motor Vehicle records. He has since pleaded guilty to a charge related to the incident.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2008 | From Reuters
Web search company Google Inc. is collaborating with Cleveland Clinic, one of the premier U.S. health institutions, to pilot an exchange of data that puts patients in charge of their own medical records. The healthcare industry has been trying to usher in a paperless era for more than a decade, holding out the promise that electronic medical records would bring significant cost savings. Currently, only a tiny minority of hospitals and primary care physicians use electronic medical records.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
EMC Corp., the world's biggest maker of storage computers, introduced Tuesday a service that lets companies back up information on their personal computers over the Internet. EMC is pushing into software and services and away from reliance on less-profitable storage computers to spur growth. Chief Executive Joseph Tucci has spent $8 billion buying software companies in the last four years. The service uses software from Berkeley Data Systems, which EMC bought in October.
WORLD
January 17, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States is giving Mexico access to an electronic database to help trace weapons smuggled from the U.S. to Mexican drug gangs, U.S. Atty. Gen. Michael B. Mukasey said. The e-Trace database has been installed at U.S. consulates in the cities of Monterrey, Hermosillo and Guadalajara. It will be expanded to the remaining six consulates by March, and should be available in Spanish soon. Mexican police will be able to determine the origin of weapons seized from criminals and then notify U.S. authorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2008 | Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writer
Twelve years after a Silver Lake man died, his pharmacy receipts and medical bills sit in a Los Angeles archive with a hand-written message declaring: "The Cost of AIDS." In a San Francisco library, a massive photo collection capturing the exuberance of gay liberation in the 1970s and its tragic collision with AIDS fills many cartons.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A House bill sponsored by two California representatives that would set up a national registry of convicted arsonists passed on a voice vote. The bill requires convicted arsonists to report to authorities on where they live or attend school, and sets up a national database developed by the attorney general to track them. The bill now goes to the Senate.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
A panel on Internet names voted to conduct further studies on the databases containing names, phone numbers and other private information on domain-name owners, deferring questions over whether such details should remain public. The committee of the Marina del Rey-based Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN, also rejected a proposal to give Internet users the ability to list third-party contacts rather than their own data in the open, searchable databases called Whois.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2005 | Claudia Zequeira, Times Staff Writer
The city of Pomona, where a 16-year-old boy randomly killed a California Highway Patrol officer last year to impress the group he wanted to join, has approved $100,000 for a long-term gang-prevention program. The program will train city employees and community leaders, as well as commission a report to draw up prevention strategies and identify funding sources for future programs.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | LINDA DARNELL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first blush, working as a file clerk in the medical records department at the now-defunct Fox Hills Hospital did not appear to be a route to a promising career for Crystal Alexander, then a 15-year-old high school student filling in part time for a worker on maternity leave. But 15 years later, Alexander is glad that the job was interesting enough that she stuck with it after high school.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Home Depot Inc. said a laptop computer containing information on 10,000 employees was stolen from a worker's car in Massachusetts. The laptop contained data on workers in the northeastern U.S. and didn't have customer data, a company spokesman said. The computer was stored in the car against Atlanta-based Home Depot's data-security policy, he said.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2007 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Software giant Microsoft Corp. on Thursday joined an increasingly crowded field of health and technology companies offering consumers an electronic personal health record. Like other Web-based personal health records, Microsoft's HealthVault is free and will allow consumers to store medical information -- such as vaccination dates and X-rays -- and share what they wish with physicians and relatives of their choosing.
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