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Information Storage And Retrieval

ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1992 | CYNTHIA CRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From all over the world, the treasured products of the best hopes and talents of screenwriters arrive at a storefront office in West Hollywood for safekeeping. Every day, upward of 100 scripts and treatments for film and television reach the Writers Guild of America, West's three-person registration office, where they are recorded by date, sealed in manila envelopes and stuffed into cardboard file boxes for transport to a warehouse whose location is kept secret.
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NEWS
June 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
In a database kept secret from patients, the government has recorded the names of nearly 500 doctors and dentists across the country who have been slapped with at least 10 disciplinary actions and malpractice payments over the last decade. One of every seven U.S. doctors and one of every eight dentists has at least one malpractice payment or disciplinary report in the National Practitioners Data Bank, which the Department of Health and Human Services has been compiling since 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1988 | JILL STEWART and BORIS YARO, Times Staff Writers
Recently, in a tiny Texas jail, a troubled man told police of a robbery and murder he had committed in Los Angeles two or three years before. The confessor could not recall the neighborhood, but he was sure of one thing: The body, its face riddled with bullets, was thrown in a dumpster next to a bar. The jailers contacted the Los Angeles Police Department to pass along the sketchy report, expecting little to come of it.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2006 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
The theft of a disk containing names, birth dates and Social Security numbers for as many as 26.5 million veterans and their spouses stirred fury in Congress on Thursday, as Republicans and Democrats pounced on Veterans Affairs Secretary Jim Nicholson, demanding to know why the agency's notorious computer security issues had not been fixed.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Customers, regulators and even industry experts were surprised to discover this month that several large California banks have been sharing private customer information with third-party companies and telemarketers. State and federal officials have questioned the policies and Congress is considering rewriting the laws that govern release of personal financial information. In the last two weeks, several banks have revised their privacy policies or halted the release of sensitive information.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
Detailed information on the day-to-day workings of the California Legislature is available on a nationwide computer network under a new law authored by Assemblywoman Debra Bowen (D-Marina del Rey). Computer users with access to Internet can view the data at no additional charge to their access costs.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1993 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the largest forays yet by a newspaper company into on-line services, Times Mirror Co. said Wednesday that it will make information from the Los Angeles Times, Newsday and New York Newsday available over the Prodigy computer network starting next year. Using a home computer equipped with a modem, a subscriber paying a flat fee will gain access to news and other material from the newspapers. Prodigy subscribers will pay an additional fee to access local Times Mirror services.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to position itself as a leader in the high-yield bond market, Salomon Bros. Inc. said it bought Drexel Burnham Lambert's software and computer database detailing Drexel's near-fabled junk bond client base. Drexel, the investment house that virtually created the junk bond market in the late 1970s but filed for bankruptcy protection this year, also would not reveal details of the transaction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2000 | ALLISON COHEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a grassy median in the middle of a busy San Fernando Valley intersection stands a stone wall bearing the names of 24 fallen Vietnam War soldiers. In New York, Oswego County's first World War II casualty is remembered with a Navy anchor propped on a bed of rocks near a Little League field. Along Illinois 146 near the town of Anna, a cracked brass plaque marks the grave of King Neptune, a 250-pound pig that was auctioned off to sell war bonds. Vietnam veteran Brian Rooney knows them all.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, This story was reported by Times staff writers Robert A. Rosenblatt, Dwight Morris and James Risen. It was written by Rosenblatt
After spending nearly $100 million on failed computer systems, the federal agency supervising the massive savings and loan cleanup has virtually abandoned efforts in Washington to keep detailed records on thousands of parcels of real estate and other assets that it is trying to sell. Rather than try to rehabilitate its crippled systems, the central headquarters of the Resolution Trust Corp. will maintain only limited information on its vast inventory of real estate and loans from failed thrifts.
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