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Information Technology

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1996
On Thursday, the federal government opens a new era in the way it acquires and uses modern computers and other information technology. This is a welcome moment because the government--the world's largest buyer and user of computers and related equipment--has done a pretty poor job in this regard. There are several noteworthy examples.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 2001 | Reuters
Motorola Inc., which last month reported its first quarterly operating loss in 15 years, said it is considering selling its Integrated Information Systems Group, a government communication and information technology business. The world's second-largest mobile phone maker already has cut costs aggressively this year, slashing 22,000 jobs. Analysts say the possible sale of Scottsdale, Ariz.-based IISG was a reassuring sign that Motorola was getting serious about turning itself around.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Computers and the Internet have dramatically transformed the nation's economy in the last five years, significantly reducing inflation and creating 7.4 million high-paying jobs, according to a Commerce Department report released Wednesday. The report marks the government's most comprehensive look to date at the growth of information technology and puts a dollar figure on the myriad advancements that have become a part of everyday life.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1997
Data Processing Resources Corp., which provides information technology staffing services, posted record net income for the fiscal year on a 98% gain in revenue. The company said it earned $6.7 million, or 71 cents a share, for the fiscal year ended July 31, more than double the net income of $3.3 million, or 54 cents a share, recorded a year ago. Revenue rose to $115 million from $58.1 million. The company said it acquired four staffing firms during the fiscal year.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Key countries reached agreement here today on a pact to eliminate tariffs on most products of the world's $1-trillion information technology industry, a step that should benefit California's economy while cutting prices and boosting global production of everything from telephones to computers and CD-ROMs.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1996 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the opening day of a global trade conference, the United States demanded Monday that an agreement to eliminate most tariffs on the world's $1-trillion information technology industry be concluded by Friday. Otherwise, U.S. officials warned, the chance for a deal might slip away. "We must reach an agreement this week," Acting U.S.
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