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Injunction

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- California's chief law enforcement officer urged the state high court Monday to refuse once again to stop same-sex marriages while the justices consider a legal bid to revive Proposition 8, the 2008 ballot measure that banned gay nuptials. Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris, responding to a request filed Friday by San Diego County Clerk Ernest J. Dronenburg Jr.,  told  California's top court that stopping gays from marrying now would amount to an unconstitutional interference with a federal court order.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
The California Supreme Court refused Monday to stop gays from marrying while it considers a legal bid to revive Proposition 8. The court rejected a request by ProtectMarriage, the sponsors of the 2008 ballot measure, to stop the issuing of marriage licenses to same-sex couples while considering the group's contention that a federal judge's injunction against the marriage ban did not apply statewide. The court is not expected to rule on the group's petition until August, at the earliest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court once again is delving into the heated battle over gay marriage as it considers a request filed Friday by the backers of Proposition 8 to stop same-sex weddings. ProtectMarriage, the sponsors of the 2008 ballot measure, asked the state high court to stop the weddings immediately on the grounds that Gov. Jerry Brown lacked the authority to order county clerks to issue same-sex marriage licenses. In a 50-page petition, ProtectMarriage contended that Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker's 2010 federal injunction against Proposition 8 did not apply statewide.
OPINION
May 14, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The Senate Judiciary Committee is just beginning its markup of the bipartisan immigration bill, but already opponents and supporters of the sweeping legislation are fighting over which immigrants should be allowed to legalize their status and which should be deported. Clearly it makes sense to refuse legal status to immigrants who have been convicted of serious crimes. But some lawmakers, including Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), are backing a provision that goes too far, excluding immigrants who have no criminal history simply because their names appear in a database of gang members or on a gang injunction.
OPINION
March 29, 2013 | By David B. Oppenheimer
This year is the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s decision to violate an injunction forbidding him to pray, sing or march in public in Birmingham, Ala. On Good Friday 1963 (which fell on April 12 that year), King led a march from the 16th Street Baptist Church (where four black children would be killed in a bombing five months later), heading toward City Hall. He was almost immediately arrested, charged with violating a court order and taken to the Birmingham jail.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Meg James
Lifetime won a major victory in a New York appeals court Thursday, which allows the network to televise its ripped-from-the-headlines movie "Romeo Killer: The Chris Porco Story" on Saturday night, as originally planned. Earlier this week, a New York state judge had issued an injunction that would have blocked the network from broadcasting its original production about a grisly killing in November 2004 in upstate New York. The convicted killer, Christopher Porco, filed suit to protest the network's project, claiming the story was a "fictionalized" account and that use of his name and likeness for such a commercial venture had not been authorized.  PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times On Thursday afternoon, an appeals court in New York lifted the injunction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Just as the holiday bills are about to come due, a federal appeals court Wednesday ruled that banks may post checking account withdrawals in a manner that allows them to garner higher overdraft fees. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously overturned a District Court injunction that prohibited Wells Fargo from charging Californians overdraft fees based on posting the most expensive debit-card transactions first. The 9th Circuit, ruling that a California consumer law was preempted by a federal banking law, also overturned an order that required Wells Fargo to pay its California customers $203 million in restitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before wondering if I'll read old Morning Fix columns when I'm 80. The Skinny: This is not a spoiler. I saw "Flight" the other night and there are two scenes in it where characters just happen to have hundreds of dollars in their wallets. In an age when everyone uses a debit card or pays with an iPhone, how many people not named Tony Soprano still carry wads of cash around? Thursday's stories include the latest in the legal fight over the AutoHop, all you need to know about James Bond and how real is NBC's comeback?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By Joe Flint
A Los Angeles federal judge has denied Fox's request for a preliminary injunction to stop satellite broadcaster Dish Network from offering its new commercial-skipping feature known as the AutoHop. “Dish is gratified that the Court has sided with consumer choice and control by rejecting Fox's efforts to deny our customers access to AutoHop," said R. Stanton Dodge, executive vice president and general counsel of Dish. While the injunction was not granted, Fox said it didn't come away empty-handed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Less than a month after approving restrictions on Halloween activities by registered sex offenders, the city of Simi Valley has been sued, accused of violating their 1st Amendment rights and those of their families. The city's new law bans Halloween displays and outside lighting every Oct. 31 at the homes of people convicted of sex crimes. For offenders listed on the Megan's Law website, the city also requires a sign on the front door in letters at least an inch tall: "No candy or treats at this residence.
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