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MAGAZINE
July 14, 1991
In Scott Kraft's article "Blood Feud" (June 2), he neglects to inform readers that the KwaZulu government that Gatsha Buthelezi heads was created by the apartheid regime as part of its failed "Bantustan" system. Buthelezi used a patronage system to build Inkatha, and the apartheid government abetted his efforts. Kraft describes the police as being "fond of Inkatha, which opposed violence against the state." What they realize and he doesn't is that Inkatha is an instrument of the state, run by one of its paid officers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000
Themba Khoza. 41, a leader of South Africa's Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party who in the early 1990s allegedly organized deadly attacks against members of the opposition African National Congress. Born in Eshowe in Kwazulu-Natal, Khoza joined the Inkatha Youth Brigade in 1975. He became a full-time party organizer in the 1980s, resigning his job at a bank in Johannesburg.
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NEWS
April 17, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Two of South Africa's most powerful black political organizations are locked in an increasingly murderous feud that their leaders fear could grow into a civil war. Scores of blacks have already died in the bitter rivalry between the United Democratic Front, a coalition of 700 anti-apartheid groups with more than 3 million members nationwide, and Inkatha, the 1.3-million-member, predominantly Zulu political movement led by Chief Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sam Nxumalo once campaigned warily for the African National Congress here on the lush, green hills where the Inkatha Freedom Party is strong--his own name rides a widely circulated hit list and violence has been a fact of life. But Friday he decided to make a weekend campaign swing into two nearby Inkatha-controlled townships, confident that the ANC-Inkatha bloodshed is, if not over, at least taking a pause before next week's elections.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1990
Jeane Kirkpatrick seems to like the word "democracy." She uses it or a derivative six times in her column ("A Color-Blind Peace Depends on Democracy," Commentary, June 11): I do not know what her definition of democracy is. I am sure that most of the people of the world including those in South Africa have little idea of the meaning, advantages and responsibilities of a democratic government. Kirkpatrick speaks of "democracy and comfort for whites." Does she equate privilege with democracy?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1990
In recent months, Nelson Mandela's African National Congress (ANC) has received a great deal of favorable and essentially uncritical coverage by the American media. Rarely mentioned are the ANC's close ties to the South African Communist Party or the brutal "necklacings" committed by youthful ANC cadre. The "South Africa Now" series gives scant attention to this darker side of the ANC and fails to adequately portray other opposition groups such as the pro-Western Inkatha movement.
NEWS
December 27, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Five people were reported killed in continued political feuding between rival South African black anti-apartheid groups despite pleas from their leaders for peace and reconciliation.
NEWS
July 30, 1991
South African President Frederik W. de Klerk will be on the hot seat today when he makes a statement on a political scandal threatening to undermine crucial all-party talks on the troubled country's future and possibly to unseat De Klerk himself. The government now admits that it secretly funneled hundreds of thousands of dollars to a Zulu-based conservative black union and the allied Inkatha Freedom Party--a rival of Nelson Mandela's African National Congress.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | Associated Press
The Zulu nationalist Inkatha Freedom Party decided Saturday to boycott the nation's first all-race election, joining pro-apartheid whites in a move that could undermine the watershed vote. But political leaders said there still was time to overcome disputes and get all groups to participate in the April 26-28 election. None of the groups in the opposition Freedom Alliance had registered for the election by the midnight Saturday deadline, although President Frederik W.
NEWS
January 18, 1991 | From Associated Press
Black leaders Nelson Mandela and Mangosuthu Buthelezi will meet Jan. 29 for the first face-to-face talks in decades between the longtime friends turned political rivals, their parties said Thursday. The announcement raised the prospect that there might eventually be a settlement between their two warring groups. But spokesmen for both sides cautioned against unrealistic expectations.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As reports of pre-election violence and intimidation plummeted nationwide, senior political leaders Thursday predicted a 95% turnout when the country's long-disenfranchised black majority goes to the polls for the first time next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | THAMI MAZWAI, Thami Mazwai is editor of Enterprise, a South African business magazine. and
The conventional wisdom is still that Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi and his Inkatha Freedom Party are crucial to the success of South Africa's first all-race elections April 26-28. Unfortunately, Buthelezi seems to care not about negotiating but about having his demands for a guaranteed and oversized share of power fully met. Many of his supporters are sensing this and backing away.
NEWS
March 19, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three of this country's most senior police officials secretly funneled weapons to the Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party and helped train black hit squads involved in political violence and terrorism, the country's most respected judicial commission announced Friday. The explosive allegations, after a six-week investigation by the independent Goldstone Commission, are the first public corroboration of frequent charges by Nelson Mandela and other critics that President Frederik W.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | Associated Press
The Zulu nationalist Inkatha Freedom Party decided Saturday to boycott the nation's first all-race election, joining pro-apartheid whites in a move that could undermine the watershed vote. But political leaders said there still was time to overcome disputes and get all groups to participate in the April 26-28 election. None of the groups in the opposition Freedom Alliance had registered for the election by the midnight Saturday deadline, although President Frederik W.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Supporters of the African National Congress battled a rival black group with guns and firebombs Saturday in a township clash described as a "Wild West shootout." At least 13 people were killed and 61 wounded, police said. The fighting erupted as hundreds of ANC supporters marched toward a police station. They were fired on by residents of a migrant workers hostel loyal to the Inkatha Freedom Party, the ANC's bitter rival.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a strange afternoon, by anyone's estimation. On a rural rugby field, white Afrikaners were grilling red meat on a smoky braai, or barbecue, as their ancestors have done for four centuries. Nearby, young Zulus performed traditional dances to the beat of cattle-skin drums. And filling the stands were 5,000 Zulu and 300 Afrikaner supporters of Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi. One of the Afrikaners even came dressed for the occasion in full Zulu regalia.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Inkatha Freedom Party leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi traveled to Soweto, a stronghold of the rival African National Congress, and told a crowd of 20,000 supporters that their struggle was almost over. He praised the government for its reforms to end apartheid and its proposed talks on a new constitution to end white minority rule, but he warned that violence between blacks must cease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2000
Themba Khoza. 41, a leader of South Africa's Zulu-based Inkatha Freedom Party who in the early 1990s allegedly organized deadly attacks against members of the opposition African National Congress. Born in Eshowe in Kwazulu-Natal, Khoza joined the Inkatha Youth Brigade in 1975. He became a full-time party organizer in the 1980s, resigning his job at a bank in Johannesburg.
NEWS
November 6, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the killing fields of Natal province, one of the most feared men is a paunchy, partially paralyzed 72-year-old with brown spectacles and a graying goatee who can't lift a telephone, much less a gun. He is Harry Gwala, spiritual leader of the thousands of angry young African National Congress comrades engaged in a bitter, tit-for-tat guerrilla war here with supporters of the Inkatha Freedom Party.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long after midnight, the mourners at Jane Ramokgola's funeral vigil were still singing, serenading residents of this impoverished township with African National Congress "freedom songs." In a jumble of shacks only a few blocks away, five Zulu supporters of the ANC's bitter rival, the Inkatha Freedom Party, gathered their guns and marched through the night, apparently determined to put a stop to the music.
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