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BUSINESS
May 7, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The House passed, on a 403-16 vote, legislation that would require two government-backed international satellite organizations, Intelsat and Inmarsat, to be sold to private investors by 2002. Intelsat has 143 member countries, and Inmarsat has 81. Each member nation decides which companies have access to the satellite services. In the U.S., Comsat Corp., a publicly traded company, provides that access.
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WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Hundreds of relatives of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 passengers marched on the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing on Tuesday, rejecting the government's conclusion that the flight crashed into the Indian Ocean with no survivors. The public protest, rare in China, appeared to have the support of the Chinese government, which provided buses to transport family members, according to one relative. PHOTOS: Malaysia Airlines saga At the same time, Beijing took pains to keep the protest under control, girding the embassy with military police, city cops and undercover security who scuffled with relatives trying to break through the security cordon to speak to the press.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After attempting to shake up the U.S. telecommunications industry in recent years, Congress now wants to take on an equally controversial target: the global commercial satellite industry. Key lawmakers are pushing bills that call for privatizing the powerful international satellite consortiums Intelsat and Inmarsat, hoping that they will slash telephone and video costs for U.S. consumers by nearly $3 billion during the next decade. The effort also aims to break the monopoly held by Comsat Corp.
WORLD
March 24, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
The British company whose satellite data helped direct search efforts for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 toward the south Indian Ocean said about two weeks ago that it had received “routine” and “automated” signals from the missing Boeing 777. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, who announced Monday that the plane carrying 239 people "ended in the southern Indian Ocean" with no hope of survivors, said the company, Inmarsat, has been performing...
WORLD
March 24, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
The British company whose satellite data helped direct search efforts for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 toward the south Indian Ocean said about two weeks ago that it had received “routine” and “automated” signals from the missing Boeing 777. Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, who announced Monday that the plane carrying 239 people "ended in the southern Indian Ocean" with no hope of survivors, said the company, Inmarsat, has been performing...
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
While the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has expanded westward amid concerns of foul play, a satellite company confirmed that signals from the plane were registered by its network. British satellite telecommunications company Inmarsat said Friday that signals from the Boeing 777 were “routine” and “automated.” It did not disclose, however, when the communications occurred in relation to the aircraft's March 8 disappearance. Inmarsat said the information was given to SITA, a multinational air transport communications and information technology company, which in turn has shared it with Malaysia Airlines.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | From Reuters
The European Union on Tuesday launched fresh attacks on a number of U.S. policies and accused the Americans of hypocrisy in their free-trade posture, especially in technology and telecommunications. In its annual "Report on United States Barriers to Trade and Investment," the EU assailed U.S. barriers to everything from foreign satellites to telephone companies and wheat gluten. It also questioned a new export-subsidy program proposed by the Clinton administration.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Hundreds of relatives of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 passengers marched on the Malaysian Embassy in Beijing on Tuesday, rejecting the government's conclusion that the flight crashed into the Indian Ocean with no survivors. The public protest, rare in China, appeared to have the support of the Chinese government, which provided buses to transport family members, according to one relative. PHOTOS: Malaysia Airlines saga At the same time, Beijing took pains to keep the protest under control, girding the embassy with military police, city cops and undercover security who scuffled with relatives trying to break through the security cordon to speak to the press.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Commerce Committee on Tuesday called for overhauling the powerful international satellite organizations Intelsat and Inmarsat, saying the government-owned consortiums are relics of 1960s telecommunications policy and impediments to robust competition. Rep. Thomas J. Bliley (R-Va.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Boeing Co.'s sprawling satellite-making operation in El Segundo got a major lift Friday when it won a contract worth about $600 million to build satellites for British telecommunications giant Inmarsat. The deal to build three communications satellites marks the second big commercial contract in as many years for the company, which has been beset by layoffs amid a dearth of orders. "It's good news for Boeing, which has hit a rough patch in the satellite business in recent years," said Jay Gullish, a space and telecommunications analyst at Futron Corp.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
While the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has expanded westward amid concerns of foul play, a satellite company confirmed that signals from the plane were registered by its network. British satellite telecommunications company Inmarsat said Friday that signals from the Boeing 777 were “routine” and “automated.” It did not disclose, however, when the communications occurred in relation to the aircraft's March 8 disappearance. Inmarsat said the information was given to SITA, a multinational air transport communications and information technology company, which in turn has shared it with Malaysia Airlines.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Boeing Co.'s sprawling satellite-making operation in El Segundo got a major lift Friday when it won a contract worth about $600 million to build satellites for British telecommunications giant Inmarsat. The deal to build three communications satellites marks the second big commercial contract in as many years for the company, which has been beset by layoffs amid a dearth of orders. "It's good news for Boeing, which has hit a rough patch in the satellite business in recent years," said Jay Gullish, a space and telecommunications analyst at Futron Corp.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | From Reuters
The European Union on Tuesday launched fresh attacks on a number of U.S. policies and accused the Americans of hypocrisy in their free-trade posture, especially in technology and telecommunications. In its annual "Report on United States Barriers to Trade and Investment," the EU assailed U.S. barriers to everything from foreign satellites to telephone companies and wheat gluten. It also questioned a new export-subsidy program proposed by the Clinton administration.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1998 | Bloomberg News
The House passed, on a 403-16 vote, legislation that would require two government-backed international satellite organizations, Intelsat and Inmarsat, to be sold to private investors by 2002. Intelsat has 143 member countries, and Inmarsat has 81. Each member nation decides which companies have access to the satellite services. In the U.S., Comsat Corp., a publicly traded company, provides that access.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1998 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After attempting to shake up the U.S. telecommunications industry in recent years, Congress now wants to take on an equally controversial target: the global commercial satellite industry. Key lawmakers are pushing bills that call for privatizing the powerful international satellite consortiums Intelsat and Inmarsat, hoping that they will slash telephone and video costs for U.S. consumers by nearly $3 billion during the next decade. The effort also aims to break the monopoly held by Comsat Corp.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the House Commerce Committee on Tuesday called for overhauling the powerful international satellite organizations Intelsat and Inmarsat, saying the government-owned consortiums are relics of 1960s telecommunications policy and impediments to robust competition. Rep. Thomas J. Bliley (R-Va.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ
Hughes Electronics Corp. said Thursday that it has won the biggest commercial satellite contract in its history, a $1.3-billion pact to build 12 satellites for a global mobile telephone system to be operated by an affiliate of the Inmarsat consortium. The award extends a prosperous year for Hughes' El Segundo-based satellite manufacturing operation, whose order backlog now stands at 41 satellites valued at a record $4.3 billion.
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