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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
Authorities were searching Thursday for an L.A. County jail inmate who escaped from the Twin Towers Correctional Facility in downtown Los Angeles. Christopher Lee Brown, 37, was being sought after escaping from jail on Wednesday. He walked out of the release area in the jail about 10 p.m. after staff apparently failed to follow security practices, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Capt. Mike Parker said, according to KTLA-TV . Brown, who was sentenced Wednesday to four years, eight months in jail for stealing computers from a medical center, was able to impersonate another inmate and escape, Parker said.
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NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Ted Rall
Computer algorithms drive online dating sites that promise to hook you up with a compatible mate. They help retailers suggest that, because you liked this book or that movie, you'll probably be into this music. So it was probably inevitable that programs based on predictive algorithms would be sold to law enforcement agencies on the pitch that they'll make society safe. The Los Angeles Police Department feeds crime data into PredPol, which then spits out a report predicting -- reportedly with impressive accuracy -- where " property crimes specifically, burglaries and car break-ins and thefts are statistically more likely to happen . " The idea is, if cops spend more time in these high-crime spots, they can stop crime before it happens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Bob Pool
About 200 prisoners were involved in a riot Tuesday at Calapatria State Prison that injured seven inmates, officials of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said. The disturbance at the Imperial County prison began about 10:15 a.m. in the maximum-security Level IL yard at Facility B. Guards from other parts of the prison rushed to the scene and fired warning shots, rounds of pepper spray and foam-tipped rubber bullets. They quelled the disturbance in about eight minutes, prison spokesman Lt. Everardo Silva said.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Michael Muskal, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Glenn Ford, one of the nation's longest-serving prisoners on death row, is scheduled to be freed from a Louisiana prison after he was exonerated of charges that he killed a man in 1983, his lawyers announced. A Louisiana court on Monday ordered that Ford, an African American who served 30 years on death row, be released after new information exonerated the former yard worker of killing a white man. Ford was expected to be released Tuesday. [Updated, 5:53 p.m.:  Ford walked free Tuesday afternoon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2014 | By Abby Sewell and Jack Leonard
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is considering a new system for deciding which jail inmates get released early by making predictions about who is most likely to commit new crimes. The proposal calls for a significant shift for the nation's largest jail system, which currently determines when inmates get released by looking at the seriousness of their most recent offense and the percentage of their sentence they have already served. Officials say the current system has weaknesses because it does not take into account the inmate's full record, including serious crimes that occurred years ago. Supporters argue the change would help select inmates for early release who are less likely to commit new crimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
Former Sheriff Lee Baca and his top aide authorized the controversial handling of a Los Angeles County jail inmate who was found to be secretly working as a federal informant, according to a court filing by three of the deputies facing federal charges in connection with the incident. The allegations that the operation, dubbed "Pandora's Box" internally, was directed by Baca and former Undersheriff Paul Tanaka are not new. But the claims, filed this week in federal court, give the first indication of the defense strategy that will be used by the jailers accused of helping to hinder a federal investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
Two Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies pleaded not guilty Thursday in connection with allegations that they assaulted a handcuffed inmate, according to a spokesman for the U.S. attorney's office. Deputies Joey Aguiar and Mariano Ramirez were the latest in a string of 21 current and former sheriff's officials charged by federal authorities in connection with the FBI's three-year investigation into brutality and other misconduct in the Sheriff's Department. Last month, federal authorities alleged that Aguiar and Ramirez violated the civil rights of the inmate by assaulting him Feb. 11, 2009, inside Men's Central Jail.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Anthony Graves survived 18 years in prison for murders he did not commit, a dozen of those years on death row, where he was twice scheduled for execution. On Wednesday, Graves stood defiant outside a courthouse in a blue pinstripe suit with several state lawmakers and announced that the State Bar of Texas would be investigating his complaint against the prosecutor who convicted him, Charles Sebesta. “Give us justice,” said Graves, 48, of Houston. The announcement was the latest salvo in a legal battle that the two men have been fighting for two decades.
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments about a Florida man, Freddie Lee Hall, who faces execution for a 1978 murder. Hall is intellectually incapable of understanding the arguments, but the state of Florida says that it has the right to execute him nevertheless, in a case that spotlights both the barbarity and the absurdity of the death penalty. This page has a long history of opposing capital punishment on the grounds of morality, overwhelming evidence of its misapplication and public expense, among other things.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Melissa Rohlin
Jailed former NFL star Aaron Hernandez has been confined to isolation for 30 days after his physical altercation with another inmate at the Bristol County House of Correction in Dartmouth, Mass., according to NECN. The onetime New England Patriots tight end will reportedly spend 23 hours a day in his cell and eat his meals there. When he leaves, he has to wear handcuffs with a waist chain and leg irons. Hernandez and another inmate, whose name has not been released, got into a fight Tuesday in a common area outside of Hernandez's former cell, officials said.
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