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June 3, 2000
Re " 'Cheaters' a Smart, Thought-Provoking Tale" (by Steven Linan, May 20): The artistic merits of HBO's "Cheaters"--the based-in-fact story of an inner-city academic decathlon team that cheats its way to victory--aside, the problem with finding mitigation of the moral dilemma at the core of the real-life story in the plight of inner-city schools is twofold: a) It perpetuates the myth and stereotype that kids in these schools can't succeed in larger competitive arenas on their own merits; b)
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OPINION
April 2, 2014 | By David C. Williams
Drive through the dilapidated main strip in Terry, Miss., and it's easy to see that the town of 1,063 is a hardscrabble place. And last month, life there got harder when the last bank branch in town closed, leaving in the lurch residents who have long depended on it as a convenient place to manage their money. The same thing is happening in countless other small towns and inner-city neighborhoods across the country, which have been left behind as banks adjust to new financial realities by shuttering branches by the thousands.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1986
Robert Scheer's article (July 10), "Old Schools Survive and Thrive," is the finest piece of writing that I have had the pleasure of reading in many years. The message contained in the article, that the inner-city schools can provide a meaningful educational opportunity through the efforts of dedicated educators, is as true for California as it is for New York. The consequences of inadequate funding for schools are as painful in California as they are in New York. This article should be required reading for all of our legislators.
SPORTS
October 27, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
- In the year that the movie "42" dramatized the story of Jackie Robinson breaking baseball's color barrier, the number of African Americans playing in the World Series is the same as the number playing in the major leagues when Robinson made his debut in 1947: one. "It's sad to see," said Boston Red Sox outfielder Quintin Berry , the only African American on the roster of either team. The percentage of African Americans in the major leagues has declined from about 19% in 1984 to about 8% today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2001
Re "Retailers See Gold in Poor Areas," May 12: This article proves the readiness of inner-city shoppers. Now, bring the stores that will have the most impact on lives: Bring bookstores to the inner city. Bring the biggest and best bookstores. Bring Borders, Barnes & Noble, Brentano's, Bookstar and any others that truly believe in the power of their product. They will thrive in this vital, untapped market. And as inner-city neighborhoods become print-rich environments, remarkably, test scores will rise in "failing" inner-city schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1993
The Jan. 31 Opinion article by Bill Fulton on urban policy offers only partial and one-sided advice to new Secretaries Henry Cisneros (HUD) and Federico Pena (transportation). Fulton correctly pinpoints the new transportation dollars as critical implementing levers for urban policy initiatives, but he then resurrects worn-out concepts of "suburbs" to support the case for inner-city investment to the implied neglect of outer-city needs. The point is that the so-called "central city" contains only a small portion of the population and jobs of our Southern California region, and "suburbs," as we knew them in past decades, no longer exist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2000
So there is a major teacher shortage in California (Dec. 8). This shortage gets even worse in major urban inner-city schools. With overcrowded classrooms, schools that are literally falling apart, school violence, uncaring and overpaid school administrations, teachers being blamed for a laundry list of student and school failures, no accountability for those who make policy at the top and the level of teachers' pay, people are surprised about the...
OPINION
July 11, 1999
Re "Highly Paid Baca Looks at Raise Reluctantly," June 25: May I offer a suggestion to Sheriff Lee Baca, considering that he has been fighting unsuccessfully regarding his pension since June 1998. Sheriff Baca, take the money that is rightfully coming to you. Then, contribute directly to a different inner-city school each month. You have the opportunity to make a difference. Take it! EVA KALPINS, West Covina
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1991
As I was reading Jackson's column, one sentence really stayed in my mind: "The law says that every American has the right to a decent and affordable home." How can this be? In a free society, one is not guaranteed a decent and affordable home, one makes a decent and affordable home for one's self. Also Jackson figures that Kuwait city will be rebuilt before anything is done about the American inner city and he cites Philadelphia as an example of inner-city decay. Shall we throw more money at inner-city problems?
OPINION
July 30, 1995
Virtually unceasing noise suffered by an inner-city neighborhood caused by an adjacent religious school is characterized (July 22) as "a problem to do with the arcana of city zoning regulations." Those of us who live in inner-city neighborhoods would call it one of the many ways outsiders fail to show consideration for those who live in the neighborhood. There is so much disrespect for inner-city neighborhoods by those who do not live in them that the words of the attorney for the Cheder of Los Angeles, while disheartening, are not surprising.
SPORTS
September 5, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
With one adventurous summer trip, senior running back Jacob Knight of Los Angeles Crenshaw demonstrated more leadership than any speech he could have given and more determination than any broken-field run he could have made. He traveled to Cambridge, Mass., at the invitation of the Harvard University football coaching staff to participate in a one-day camp and campus tour, an experience that few, if any, Crenshaw players have dared to attempt. Walking on the grounds of one of America's most prestigious academic institutions, Knight contemplated what is possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By David Ng
Inner-City Arts, a skid row center that provides free arts education to underprivileged youth, has undergone an abrupt change in leadership, with President and Chief Executive Joseph Collins departing the organization after less than two years on the job. The center's board of directors announced Collins' departure this week and said that it has named Robert Smiland to lead the organization. The new appointment is an unusual choice for the center given Smiland's private-sector background and lack of experience running a nonprofit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times
"Brother Nick," said a woman in a white sundress. "Brother Nick, we call on you, brother Nick. " The sun was rising and a group of surfers stood on a beach in Santa Monica, surrounding longboards and rose bouquets, celebrating a pioneer whose life was cut short in nearby waters 62 years ago. "Brother Nick ... Brother Nick!" Together, about 70 in all, they conjured the spirit and memory of Los Angeles' first documented black surfer. Together they hailed Nick Gabaldon's quest "to be free, despite all of the oppression" he encountered on the beach.
SPORTS
May 14, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
On a sunny Tuesday afternoon on a cluttered street in Gardena, some very big and skilled athletes are hanging out on a concrete basketball court, bouncing around underneath rusted backboards and chain nets, acting out a typical inner-city scene, with one small exception. They are playing baseball. "It's Showtime!" shouts Coach Wil Aaron, only this is a very different kind of Showtime. Aaron is using a tennis racket to whack tennis balls at close range to infielders on his Gardena Serra High baseball team, whose players are leaping and spinning out of stereotypes and perhaps into history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter, Los Angeles Times
At Harvard-Westlake, a private high school in the shadows of the Hollywood Hills, players from the basketball team heaped praise on the alumnus who this week became the first active NBA player to announce that he is gay. "We have a lot of pride in him," Michael Sheng, 17, said of Jason Collins. "He's a hero, an icon for what he has done. " Support from basketball players was more tentative at Susan Miller Dorsey High, a school in the heart of Los Angeles' black community that has long been an athletic powerhouse, producing numerous NFL and NBA players.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2012 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
A boy with brick-red curls and a film of sunscreen masking his freckles squeezed a chunk of dead squid onto his bait hook. Noah Lopez, 12, bit down on his lower lip and watched as the baby-blue fishing line that matched his hoodie unraveled into the Pacific Ocean. A moment after another boy yelled, "I just caught two!," Noah thought he felt a nibble. He started to crank up his line but felt no tension. He drooped his shoulders, let his line back out and waited. That morning, Noah, along with 73 other young students from Montebello, embarked on a fishing trip to San Pedro.
WORLD
June 23, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Bombings and shootings killed more than 30 people across Iraq, including high school students on their way to final exams, part of a new round of violence ahead of next week's deadline for U.S. troops to withdraw from urban areas. The attacks pushed the three-day Iraqi death toll over 100, shattering a recent lull and adding fresh doubt over the ability of government forces to protect people without U.S. soldiers by their sides. American combat troops have already begun moving from inner-city outposts to large bases outside Baghdad and other cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001
Cynthia du Bois is correct when she says parents have to demand more from the schools but dead wrong when she says it can only come from competition (letter, May 8). The main problem is the parents. When the parents are active in the PTA, they can demand certain changes. It is done all the time. The biggest reason for the success of inner-city kids who go to private schools is that their parents are interested enough to send them, pay and then make sure that they are doing their homework.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
AD edited; elders slotted The new documentary "The Anderson Monarchs" takes on one of those classic stories - inner-city kids, dedicated coach, winning against the odds and learning life lessons in the process. It follows the unlikely success of the Monarchs, a girls' soccer team of 11- and 12-year-olds in Philadelphia and their soft-spoken coach as they fight for victories large and small. At the time, they were the only African American girls' soccer club in the U.S. and take their name from the boundary-breaking African American contralto Marian Anderson, whose history and legacy is woven through the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2012 | By David Ng
Inner-City Arts, the nonprofit arts education organization in the Skid Row area of downtown Los Angeles, is receiving a donation of $250,000 from DreamWorks Animation, the organizations said Monday.  The grant covers a five-year period and will go to support the DreamWorks Animation Academy at Inner-City Arts. In 2008, the movie company made a $500,000 donation to help establish the academy, which offers classes in digital arts, animation, graphic design and filmmaking. Inner-City Arts provides free arts education to disadvantaged youth from the downtown area and other parts of L.A. The organization also offers classes in the performing and visual arts.  Future plans include student internships at DreamWorks Animation.
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