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NEWS
September 18, 1994 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nine months ago, the Northridge earthquake put an end to inpatient services at St. John's Hospital and Health Center, leaving walls ripped apart and sending eerie, X-shaped cracks up and down the facility's exterior. Three hundred patients were evacuated. About 1,750 jobs were lost. And the Santa Monica hospital was plunged into self-examination: How to re-create the hospital in the face of the massive changes under way in the health-care industry. The jury is still out on exactly how the St.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1994 | LAWRENCE C. CAIRD, Lawrence C. Caird has been employed by the Veterans Administration since 1972, including seven years in the Western Regional Office of Public Affairs, serving as director from 1989 to 1992. He is now administrative officer for psychiatry for the VA Medical Center in Sepulveda. and
By its treatment of veterans, America has always supported those who stepped forward to defeat our enemies and allow us to have a country. A disturbing reversal of this tradition is taking place in the decision by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to cease inpatient activities at the VA Medical Center in Sepulveda. The closing will harm tens of thousands of veterans who rely on the hospital. And up to 1,000 employees and salaries will be lost to the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | LAUREN A. BORSA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the Hartford Retreat for the Insane opened in 1822, its first patients were a man suffering from "fanaticism" and a woman who broke down "from overtaxing the intellect with difficult studies." Renamed the Institute of Living in the 1930s, the institution took on a tonier image and became the place where actors, authors, athletes and the just plain rich came to play billiards, bowl and get help for mental problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1990 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego Hospice staff workers moved into their $11-million, bluff-top complex overlooking Mission Valley on Friday, marking the beginning of the end of a five-year battle against local residents and the state Legislature to build the facility for the terminally ill. The three-building complex includes a 24-bed hospital and a research center dedicated to the study of palliative care, an undeveloped branch of medicine dealing with patients suffering from incurable diseases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1989 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court has granted Didi Hirsch Psychiatric Services the go-ahead to build a 14-bed psychiatric treatment facility in Inglewood across the street from Centinela Hospital Medical Center, which had attempted to block the facility. In a ruling Thursday, Superior Court Judge Kurt J. Lewin criticized the hospital for showing an irrational fear of the mentally ill in trying to move the residential facility out of its back yard.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Ventura County Board of Supervisors, agreeing that the county's inpatient center for the mentally ill is overcrowded and understaffed, voted Tuesday to spend $25,000 to draw up architectural plans to expand it. The board said it favors a $900,000 construction project that would add a locked 15-bed section to the mental health unit across from the Ventura County Medical Center, but it raised concerns about the additional $700,000 that it would cost annually to care for those patients.
MAGAZINE
October 4, 1987 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, Kathleen Doheny is a frequent contributor to The Times.
BERNIECE Davis took life at full tilt. She worked. Spent time with her husband and two kids. Enjoyed volunteering at church. Even when she was exhausted or busy, she admits, she had trouble saying no to anyone who wanted her time. "I tried to be all things to all people," says the 45-year-old Los Angeles woman. Then the pain started. Last October, Davis began feeling discomfort in her abdomen. "In early January," she recalls with a grimace, "it got worse.
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