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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By John Horn
That didn't take long. A day after "Insidious: Chapter 2" killed it at the box office, the horror film's makers said they are planning to make a third installment in the franchise. Made for just $5 million, "Insidious: Chapter 2" sold an estimated $41.1 million of tickets in its opening  weekend,  more than three times the $13.3 million the first “Insidious” grossed in 2011. On Monday, the film's financiers -- Entertainment One, FilmDistrict and Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions -- said they were developing a third "Insidious" movie, written by Leigh Whannell, a screenwriter on the first two "Insidious" films.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before proclaiming next week's "Breaking Bad" to be the best episode of TV ever.  The Skinny: The bad news is that the Redskins are 0-2. The good news is they play in the NFC East, where everyone is mediocre. Still, if they don't beat Detroit next week it will be a long and ugly season. Monday's roundup includes the weekend box-office report and NBCUniversal's big hire. Daily Dose: You know your football team is bad when the local TV station is basically apologizing for carrying its games.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Chris Barton
In a continuation of a theme for 2013, the horror sequel "Insidious: Chapter 2" looks to be another big hit for the horror genre. After "The Conjuring," "Mama" and "The Purge" took in solid box office numbers against comparatively lower budgets this year, the sequel to 2011's "Insidious" earned more than $20 million on Friday according to estimates. That figure puts the film on a pace to earn more than $35 million, which was its expected total this weekend based on pre-release audience surveys.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Revolutions never start when you think they will. In 1999, “The Blair Witch Project” took the film world by storm, becoming one of the hottest horror movies of all time. It was supposed to start a new wave of low-budget productions in the genre that would be similarly compelling and popular. That didn't happen, of course. Over the decade that followed, the film world endured a wave of copycat torture-porn movies and the last-gasp redos of a previous generation of hits a la “Friday the 13th” and “Nightmare on Elm Street.” Yet 14 years later, the revolution is officially in full swing.
NEWS
March 18, 1990
The "Newhart" show on Feb. 26 was their best this season. It was the Hooligans-vs.-the Puffians episode which showcased the characters we've grown to know and appreciate other than Stephanie and Michael and their insidious superficiality. Paul and Jeanne Wickstrom, Lake Forest
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1993
I have just read your story on Ramona Ripston and I must comment that whether she reflects one's point of view or not, here is a person that must be congratulated on her determination and strength. According to your article she took over an organization and turned it to her beliefs or faith. However, as Justice Louis Brandeis wrote: "The greatest dangers to liberty lurk in insidious encroachment by men of zeal, well-meaning but without understanding." LLEWELLYN B. MOSES Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1993
I am relieved to see Ron Harris in print again. I value his insightful assessments of some of the dilemmas that confront us. For example, his response to the verdicts in the trial of the police officers in the Rodney King beating case brought me to tears. His more recent columns, "A Black and White Answer to Question of Blame" (Aug. 7) and "The Hidden Faces of Racism" (Aug. 13), are a welcome addition to The Times because of his honest attempt to discuss the complexities of race, class and ethnicity in contemporary America.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1995
Turan voices concerns about Hollywood rape scenes that I have been feeling for quite some time. But the rising "wave of rape chic" that Turan sees as "depressing and dehumanizing" could also numb movie audiences to the true horror rape victims experience. The increasing intensity and frequency of motion picture rape scenes can desensitize moviegoers to a frighteningly vicious and demeaning crime. Movie audiences should take a step back and consider the more insidious effects the gratuitous rape scenes current filmmakers like "Showgirls" director Paul Verhoeven and writer Joe Eszterhas employ as cheap plot devices, and think about what the $7.50 they shell out for tickets is really supporting.
OPINION
January 11, 2005
Re "Two True Pictures of the Terror War," Commentary, Jan. 6: Max Boot is correct when he asks, where is the outrage? Let's take that question one step further and wonder where is the outrage from the Republicans about the raid on democracy by the Florida vote? Or about the lies furnished by this administration leading us into a war that was not about our protection? How about outrage at the administration's prosecution of the war by not originally listening to the military leaders? Or the repudiation of environmental safeguards?
HEALTH
January 18, 2010 | Roy Wallack, Gear
"Oh, you mean the guy with the 70-year-old head and the 20-year-old body-builder body? That picture has got to be Photoshopped." Dr. Jeffry Life smiles when I tell him about the general reaction I get about the famous picture of him with his shirt off, the shot that turned a mild-mannered doctor in his mid-60s into a poster boy for super-fit aging and controversial hormone replacement Appearing in medical-clinic ads in airline magazines and...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By John Horn
That didn't take long. A day after "Insidious: Chapter 2" killed it at the box office, the horror film's makers said they are planning to make a third installment in the franchise. Made for just $5 million, "Insidious: Chapter 2" sold an estimated $41.1 million of tickets in its opening  weekend,  more than three times the $13.3 million the first “Insidious” grossed in 2011. On Monday, the film's financiers -- Entertainment One, FilmDistrict and Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions -- said they were developing a third "Insidious" movie, written by Leigh Whannell, a screenwriter on the first two "Insidious" films.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
So much for that Friday the 13th curse.  Though its official opening coincided with the infamously unlucky day, "Insidious: Chapter 2" found plenty of good fortune at the box office this weekend. The low-budget horror sequel debuted at No. 1 with a stellar $41.1 million, according to an estimate from distributor FilmDistrict. The only other new film to hit theaters this weekend, the dark comedy "The Family," launched with a good-but-not-great $14.5 million. (Both movies had screenings late Thursday evening, and those ticket sales are included in their total weekend gross.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2013 | By Chris Barton
In a continuation of a theme for 2013, the horror sequel "Insidious: Chapter 2" looks to be another big hit for the horror genre. After "The Conjuring," "Mama" and "The Purge" took in solid box office numbers against comparatively lower budgets this year, the sequel to 2011's "Insidious" earned more than $20 million on Friday according to estimates. That figure puts the film on a pace to earn more than $35 million, which was its expected total this weekend based on pre-release audience surveys.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Abele
If "The Conjuring" and "Insidious" director James Wan ever made a romantic comedy, one imagines he'd still set it in a creaky old two-story with dark corners and foreboding armoires. For his latest hauntfest "Insidious: Chapter 2," we're back with the possession-afflicted Lambert family - nervous mom Renai (Rose Byrne) and astral-projecting dad Josh (Patrick Wilson) - trying to regroup from the spirit realm trauma that almost took their son Dalton. But there's still the unresolved matter of what happened to supernatural whisperer Elise (Lin Shaye)
OPINION
August 10, 2012 | By Scott C. Alexander
Almost from the beginning of their coverage of the horrific and deadly shooting at the Sikh temple in Wisconsin, CNN and other news media went out of their way to send a message to the American public: "Sikhs are not Muslims. " But what were we to make of that message? If the temple's members had been Muslims, would the attack have then been justified? We say we don't endorse prejudice against one group or another, but for some reason we also want to make sure people know who the "we" and the "they" really are. CNN would probably say it was simply trying to clear up a common misunderstanding that, in this case, may have been shared by the gunman himself.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Ding. Ding. It's 3 a.m., and your cellphone starts making its instantly recognizable, impossible-to-ignore you-just-got-a-text sound. Your heart starts pounding. Is a loved one hurt? Is there some crisis at work? You reach for the nightstand, pick up the phone and read: "Your number was selected as our iPad winner of the day! Enter 'IPAD' here to redeem!" As you probably know, you are not really a winner of the day, you are the victim of mobile phone spam, a modern, insidious annoyance growing at an unacceptable rate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011
'Insidious' MPAA rating: PG-13 for thematic material, violence, terror and frightening images, and brief strong language Running time: 1 hour, 42 minutes Playing: In general release
BUSINESS
June 22, 1986
I must take complete exception to the conclusions drawn by P. Klemperer and I. P. L. Png in their June 8 Viewpoint column ("Frequent Flyer Plans: Marketing Device With Insidious Effects"). They assume that all frequent travelers are out to abuse their employers, rip off the IRS, and that such plans directly inhibit price competition. I really do not believe that they have checked their facts. A much earlier article in the Times Travel Section bemoaned the demise of true first class travel due to the frequent flyer programs.
OPINION
March 9, 2012 | By David A. Lehrer and Joe R. Hicks
The results are in. Of the 1,005 California judges who responded to a government survey released last week, 969 identified themselves as heterosexual, 19 as lesbians and 17 as gay men. We know this - though it's none of our business - because of a highly intrusive law passed by the Legislature last year. Under its provisions, every judge in the state, as well as all judicial applicants, nominees and appointees, is asked to provide information about his or her "gender, gender identity and sexual orientation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Lincoln Lawyer Lionsgate, $29.95; Blu-ray, $39.99 Anyone who tries to adapt the work of bestselling mystery novelist Michael Connelly in the future should take a long look at this, which gets the author exactly right. Matthew McConaughey plays clever, in-demand attorney Mickey Haller, who works out of his car and never misses an angle; Ryan Phillippe is his latest client, a rich kid accused of a violent crime. The case is nothing that hasn't been seen in hundreds of other legal thrillers, but McConaughey delivers his most charismatic performance in more than a decade, and director Brad Furman (with screenwriter John Romano)
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