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NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
You can't sleep.  You've tried counting sheep, drinking warm milk, maybe even taking medications like Benadryl or sleeping pills.   Maybe next you should try cooling your brain. According to research presented Monday at Sleep 2011 , the annual meeting of the Associated Profession Sleep Societies, cooling the brain and can reduce the amount of time it takes people with insomnia to fall asleep -- and increase the length of time they stay that way. To achieve "frontal cerebral thermal transfer," as the cooling is called, researchers Dr. Eric Nofzinger and Dr. Daniel Buysse of the Sleep Neuroimaging Research Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine outfitted 24 people --  12 with insomnia, and 12 without -- with soft plastic caps.  The caps had tubes for circulating water at neutral, moderate or maximum "cooling intensity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Jeff Vandermeer
In "Black Moon," first-time novelist Kenneth Calhoun documents a plague of sleeplessness that threatens the very fabric of the world and reality. The sleepless have hallucinations and turn into the equivalent of manic, deranged zombies, while those who can still sleep struggle to maintain order, or even certainty, amid rising chaos. It's an intriguing premise, riffing as it does on the fading divide between work and free time, the virtual and real worlds, as well as modern fears of a virus-borne apocalypse.
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HEALTH
November 1, 2010 | By Joe Graedon and Theresa Graedon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I take zolpidem (Ambien) for insomnia. It helps me fall asleep but not stay asleep, and it gives me a dry mouth. My doctor suggested I try melatonin instead to prolong the time I stay asleep. Does that sound reasonable? The studies on melatonin are mixed. A double-blind French study published this summer in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine found no benefit. It appears to be more useful for jet lag, according to a report in the September issue of Current Treatment Options in Neurology.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo
For military personnel sent to war zones, seeing killing, maiming or dead bodies dramatically increases the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. But researchers studying service members deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq have identified another factor that may raise the risk of those psychiatric conditions by almost the same degree: a history of insomnia. In a study published Friday in the journal Sleep, scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego found that sleep problems before deployment at least doubled the risk for PTSD and quadrupled it for depression.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Wake up and read this: Workers with insomnia are costing the country $63 billion in lost productivity each year, according to a new study. Researchers from Harvard Medical School, the University of Michigan and elsewhere arrived at this figure by giving detailed questionnaires to more than 10,000 adults who were members of a large, nationwide health plan. The responses revealed that 23.2% of workers suffer from insomnia , as defined by psychiatrists and sleep experts. (Key factors include difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep and having sleep that isn't restful or restorative.)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Jeff Vandermeer
In "Black Moon," first-time novelist Kenneth Calhoun documents a plague of sleeplessness that threatens the very fabric of the world and reality. The sleepless have hallucinations and turn into the equivalent of manic, deranged zombies, while those who can still sleep struggle to maintain order, or even certainty, amid rising chaos. It's an intriguing premise, riffing as it does on the fading divide between work and free time, the virtual and real worlds, as well as modern fears of a virus-borne apocalypse.
NEWS
January 26, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Sleeping seems easy enough, but not so for the estimated 5 percent to 20 percent of Americans who have insomnia. Perhaps, a new study suggests, they should spend less time in bed. The study published online Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine tested 79 older adults with insomnia. In one group, patients were told to: "Reduce time in bed; get up at the same time every day, regardless of sleep duration; do not go to bed unless sleepy; and do not stay in bed unless asleep.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Alan Zarembo
For military personnel sent to war zones, seeing killing, maiming or dead bodies dramatically increases the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. But researchers studying service members deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq have identified another factor that may raise the risk of those psychiatric conditions by almost the same degree: a history of insomnia. In a study published Friday in the journal Sleep, scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego found that sleep problems before deployment at least doubled the risk for PTSD and quadrupled it for depression.
OPINION
April 5, 2008
Re "Snooze alarm," Opinion, March 30 Gayle Greene implies that the drug abuse of certain celebrities was caused by sleep deprivation so extreme that, according to her, they overdosed on sleep medications. This is misleading and misrepresents the true circumstances involved in the deaths of these celebrities. Heath Ledger's autopsy revealed a cocktail of drugs in his body, many of which were not intended for soporific effect. One cause of insomnia is prescription drug use. Therefore, insomnia may be caused by drugs, not the other way around, as Greene suggests.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
For those who need further evidence that you can't believe everything you see on TV, along comes the tale of a New Jersey man who says he sustained third-degree burns on his feet after following an insomnia remedy touted by Dr. Mehmet Oz on his daytime talk show. The remedy was a “heated rice footsie,” which the show's website describes like this: “Simply pour rice into your socks, heat them in the microwave until they're warm, then wear the socks for up to 20 minutes while lying in bed.” What good would that do, you ask?
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
For those who need further evidence that you can't believe everything you see on TV, along comes the tale of a New Jersey man who says he sustained third-degree burns on his feet after following an insomnia remedy touted by Dr. Mehmet Oz on his daytime talk show. The remedy was a “heated rice footsie,” which the show's website describes like this: “Simply pour rice into your socks, heat them in the microwave until they're warm, then wear the socks for up to 20 minutes while lying in bed.” What good would that do, you ask?
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
As if employers don't have enough causes of lost productivity to worry about, here comes a new one: insomnia. A new study projects that the disorder leads to about 274,000 mistakes that cause over $30 billion in losses due to accidents and workplace errors. Though it may seem obvious that a lack of sleep would lead to more mistakes on the job, only two previous studies - both relatively small and carried out in France - had tried to determine how many workers were affected. The new study, published Monday in the Archives of General Psychiatry, is by far the largest to look at the effect of insomnia on the workplace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2011 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
In the film "This Is It," Michael Jackson is shown as agile and energetic as ever, on the cusp of possibly the greatest comeback in music history. "We're all here because of him," director Kenny Ortega said in the documentary, between images of Jackson lithely floating across the stage and giving commands about how the show is to be run. "May that continue, with him leading the way. " But a starkly different portrait of Jackson emerged in...
OPINION
September 25, 2011 | By Amy Goldman Koss
The other day, I came across a recent study by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. It found that insomnia affects about 23% of U.S. workers, and it put the annual national cost for the sleeping disorder at $63.2 billion. That night, I lay awake for hours worrying about all that wasted money. OK, I didn't really. But I have spent countless hours when I wanted to be asleep fretting about things far less important. And I have spent considerable time reflecting on sleeplessness.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Wake up and read this: Workers with insomnia are costing the country $63 billion in lost productivity each year, according to a new study. Researchers from Harvard Medical School, the University of Michigan and elsewhere arrived at this figure by giving detailed questionnaires to more than 10,000 adults who were members of a large, nationwide health plan. The responses revealed that 23.2% of workers suffer from insomnia , as defined by psychiatrists and sleep experts. (Key factors include difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep and having sleep that isn't restful or restorative.)
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
You can't sleep.  You've tried counting sheep, drinking warm milk, maybe even taking medications like Benadryl or sleeping pills.   Maybe next you should try cooling your brain. According to research presented Monday at Sleep 2011 , the annual meeting of the Associated Profession Sleep Societies, cooling the brain and can reduce the amount of time it takes people with insomnia to fall asleep -- and increase the length of time they stay that way. To achieve "frontal cerebral thermal transfer," as the cooling is called, researchers Dr. Eric Nofzinger and Dr. Daniel Buysse of the Sleep Neuroimaging Research Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine outfitted 24 people --  12 with insomnia, and 12 without -- with soft plastic caps.  The caps had tubes for circulating water at neutral, moderate or maximum "cooling intensity.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Scientists have identified a rare but hereditary form of insomnia that has worn out at least one victim and probably more. Initially diagnosed as suffering from dementia, the 53-year-old Italian man became progressively unable to sleep as standard drug treatments proved useless. After nine months, he died from pneumonia, apparently because his immune system became weakened by a lack of sleep. "This is the first time such a case has been identified," said Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1998 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The range of poor decisions that marks Jorge Albertella's drama "Insomnia" and director Martin Berkowitz' production of it at Actors' Playhouse in Long Beach is sadder than the tragic story Albertella tries to tell. Against all odds, what looks on paper to be a charged face-off between a torture victim in a South American dictatorship and his torturer ends up being amateurishly routine and ham-fisted.
NEWS
January 26, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Sleeping seems easy enough, but not so for the estimated 5 percent to 20 percent of Americans who have insomnia. Perhaps, a new study suggests, they should spend less time in bed. The study published online Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine tested 79 older adults with insomnia. In one group, patients were told to: "Reduce time in bed; get up at the same time every day, regardless of sleep duration; do not go to bed unless sleepy; and do not stay in bed unless asleep.
NEWS
December 2, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Snoring and insomnia are conditions that appear to predict an individual's risk of developing metabolic syndrome and may even help cause it, according to a study released Wednesday. Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors -- excess abdominal fat, high triglycerides, high blood sugar, low HDL cholesterol and high blood pressure -- that increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. University of Pittsburgh researchers examined 812 people age 45 to 74 for metabolic syndrome or diabetes and gave them questionnaires on sleep quality.
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