Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsInspector General
IN THE NEWS

Inspector General

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | By Paige St. John
A catalog of recent misconduct cases in California's corrections system includes allegations that prison guards groped and grappled with inmates, brought them drugs, shared their booze and solicited them for sex. The two-volume report , created by the independent Office of Inspector General, chronicles 117 incidents within state prisons and 93 investigations from July to December 2012. It starts with a cook at a central California prison accused of asking inmates to sit on his lap, "tickle and fondle him. " It ends with the tale of a parole agent who shot the charging dog of his parolee.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By Brian Bennett
WASHINGTON - The former top watchdog for the Homeland Security Department rewrote reports and slowed investigations at the request of senior staff for then-Secretary Janet Napolitano, a review conducted by Senate staff found. Charles K. Edwards, who was acting inspector general for Homeland Security from late 2011 through early 2013, considered aides to Napolitano to be friends, socialized with them over drinks and dinner and, at their urging, improperly made changes to several investigative reports, according to the Senate review released Thursday.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - The independent watchdog for the U.S. Postal Service has raised new concerns about an exclusive contract with real estate giant CBRE Group Inc. to handle leases and sales of postal properties nationwide, saying the arrangement presents “potential financial risks.” The office of inspector general has also sought an independent real estate firm to review all appraisals tied to transactions under the 2011 contract to ensure that...
BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera, This post has been updated with the latest developments.
WASHINGTON -- The IRS paid a total of about $1.1 million in bonuses over about two years to more than 1,100 employees who had been disciplined for failing to pay their own taxes, according to an inspector general's report. Those employees also received awards of more than 10,000 hours of extra time off and 69 faster-than-normal pay grade increases. They were among more than 2,800 IRS employees during that period who got performance awards within one year of disciplinary action, such as suspensions or written reprimands, the report found.
IMAGE
May 21, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli, Matea Gold and Melanie Mason
WASHINGTON -- The former top official of the Internal Revenue Service told senators Tuesday he was “dismayed and saddened” by an inspector general's report detailing how, during his tenure as IRS commissioner, the agency inappropriately scrutinized targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status. Douglas Shulman, who ran the agency for five years before retiring in November 2012, appeared before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday morning, along with Steven T. Miller, who succeeded him as acting IRS chief, and J. Russell George, the Treasury inspector general for tax administration.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's inspector general has opened an investigation into the Northern California firm behind a massive recall of nearly 9 million pounds of beef products, raising the possibility of criminal wrongdoing by the company.  A spokesman for the the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service confirmed the investigation to The Times on Tuesday.  Rancho Feeding Corp. of Petaluma on Saturday announced a recall of 8.7 million pounds of beef products processed at its plant over the last year and sold in California and three other states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
The new inspector general for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is recommending that the county cut off its contracts with two longtime civilian monitoring agencies, concluding they had only limited success in helping the troubled department. If the board accepts his recommendations, it would mark the end of relationships with two of the nation's most widely respected police monitors. The inspector general, former prosecutor Max Huntsman, said that both Michael Gennaco and Merrick Bobb had their successes and were supported by well-intentioned staffers.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | United Press International
President Reagan on Friday named acting Inspector General Charles Gillum of the General Services Administration to be inspector general of the Small Business Administration. Gillum, 47, would succeed Mary Wieseman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Director-adapter Michael Schlitt's version of "The Inspector General," Nikolai Gogol's tale of mistaken identity in 19th century czarist Russia, inhabits the realm of the absurd, peopled with grotesque human monsters. As presented at the Actors' Gang, its results are mixed: a well-considered, elegantly hilarious first act followed by an unrestrained, excessively indulgent second act. A tighter second half would really lift this well-acted interpretation into absurdist heaven.
OPINION
March 26, 1995
After the 1965 Watts riots, the McCone Commission recommended the creation of an office of inspector general made up of civilians and Los Angeles police officers who would operate outside the regular LAPD chain of command. It would have handled all civilian complaints against officers, bringing credibility to the process, and it would have reported directly to the police chief. It was a good idea. It was never implemented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Abby Sewell and Soumya Karlamangla
Los Angeles County officials proposed a budget Monday that would pump money into reforming major problem areas, including the jails and foster care system, while expanding county medical staffs to manage the transition to federal healthcare reform. As part of a $26-billion spending plan that builds on post-recession economic improvements, Chief Executive William T Fujioka called for adding more than 1,300 positions to county government, including nurses, social workers and staff for the newly created Sheriff's Department inspector general.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - An inspectors general report released Thursday faulted the FBI for failing to conduct a "more thorough assessment" of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev, saying such an investigation might have turned up evidence about his growing embrace of Islamic militancy and his possible threat to the United States. But the report's unclassified summary stopped short of saying a closer examination of Tsarnaev would necessarily have prevented the April 15, 2013, attack, which killed three people and injured more than 260. Acting on a 2011 tip from Russian intelligence, the FBI investigated Tsarnaev before last year's bombing, but closed the inquiry after the bureau found no links to terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Significant holes in record keeping at Los Angeles International Airport and inadequate oversight by the Federal Aviation Administration has made it difficult to ensure that millions of dollars in airport revenue are being spent properly for law enforcement, a new government audit has found. The review by the U.S. Department of Transportation's inspector general revealed that Los Angeles World Airports, the operator of LAX, has paid at least $7.9 million in the last few years to the Los Angeles Police Department without documentation showing that the services provided were airport-related.
OPINION
March 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It was no surprise last week when Los Angeles County Inspector General Max Huntsman recommended against renewing contracts with two agencies monitoring the Sheriff's Department. The same citizens commission that called for the creation of Huntsman's office also suggested that it absorb the functions of those other agencies, one of them established 22 years ago to report on excessive force and lax discipline, the other created nine years later to monitor the sheriff's handling of deputy misconduct allegations.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2014 | Ricardo Lopez
If the IRS is calling and demanding you pay up or else, it's probably not the IRS. In what officials in Washington are calling the largest of its kind, a sophisticated phone scam has swindled 20,000 people nationally out of a combined $1 million. Scammers are armed with enough information and technological know-how to bilk taxpayers, often convincing unsuspecting victims because they can recite the last four digits of their Social Security number, officials said. The call that comes in appears to be -- at least on caller ID -- from the Internal Revenue Service.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
An Internal Revenue Service watchdog is warning taxpayers of a scam that so far has swindled 20,000 people out of a combined $1 million, officials said Thursday. The Treasury inspector general for Taxpayer Administration said sophisticated scammers are cold-calling people claiming to be from the IRS and are armed with enough information, such as the last four digits of a person's Social Security number, to convince victims to wire them money. "This is the largest scam of its kind that we have ever seen," said J. Russell George, the Treasury inspector general for Tax Administration.  The scammers have targeted thousands of people in nearly every state, the agency said.  Callers claim to be from the IRS and tell people they owe taxes that must be paid immediately using a pre-paid debit card or through a wire transfer.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON -- The Interior Department is losing tens of millions of dollars in revenue annually because it leases public land for coal mining at rock-bottom prices, according to a report by the agency's inspector general The report focuses on coal leases for federal and tribal lands sold by the Bureau of Land Management to mining companies. Most coal on public lands is in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana, a region that produces about 40% of the coal that the United States burns in its power plants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
One of the longtime civilian monitors for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department defended his work Wednesday and said he should have his contract with the county renewed. Merrick Bobb's statements come a day after the new inspector general for the Sheriff's Department recommended the Board of Supervisors cut Bobb's contract, concluding that he and the agency's other monitor had limited success in helping the troubled department. In his letter to the board, Inspector General Max Huntsman said that over the years, Bobb had provided an "invaluable" outside perspective but in recent years his "influence has waned" and he had "little direct relationship with the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
The new inspector general for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is recommending that the county cut off its contracts with two longtime civilian monitoring agencies, concluding they had only limited success in helping the troubled department. If the board accepts his recommendations, it would mark the end of relationships with two of the nation's most widely respected police monitors. The inspector general, former prosecutor Max Huntsman, said that both Michael Gennaco and Merrick Bobb had their successes and were supported by well-intentioned staffers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|