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Inspector General

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Joel Rubin
Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty, according to records and interviews. An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed. LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 25, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It was no surprise last week when Los Angeles County Inspector General Max Huntsman recommended against renewing contracts with two agencies monitoring the Sheriff's Department. The same citizens commission that called for the creation of Huntsman's office also suggested that it absorb the functions of those other agencies, one of them established 22 years ago to report on excessive force and lax discipline, the other created nine years later to monitor the sheriff's handling of deputy misconduct allegations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - The independent watchdog for the U.S. Postal Service has raised new concerns about an exclusive contract with real estate giant CBRE Group Inc. to handle leases and sales of postal properties nationwide, saying the arrangement presents “potential financial risks.” The office of inspector general has also sought an independent real estate firm to review all appraisals tied to transactions under the 2011 contract to ensure that...
BUSINESS
March 22, 2014 | Ricardo Lopez
If the IRS is calling and demanding you pay up or else, it's probably not the IRS. In what officials in Washington are calling the largest of its kind, a sophisticated phone scam has swindled 20,000 people nationally out of a combined $1 million. Scammers are armed with enough information and technological know-how to bilk taxpayers, often convincing unsuspecting victims because they can recite the last four digits of their Social Security number, officials said. The call that comes in appears to be -- at least on caller ID -- from the Internal Revenue Service.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's inspector general has opened an investigation into the Northern California firm behind a massive recall of nearly 9 million pounds of beef products, raising the possibility of criminal wrongdoing by the company.  A spokesman for the the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service confirmed the investigation to The Times on Tuesday.  Rancho Feeding Corp. of Petaluma on Saturday announced a recall of 8.7 million pounds of beef products processed at its plant over the last year and sold in California and three other states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
The new inspector general for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is recommending that the county cut off its contracts with two longtime civilian monitoring agencies, concluding they had only limited success in helping the troubled department. If the board accepts his recommendations, it would mark the end of relationships with two of the nation's most widely respected police monitors. The inspector general, former prosecutor Max Huntsman, said that both Michael Gennaco and Merrick Bobb had their successes and were supported by well-intentioned staffers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | By Paige St. John
A catalog of recent misconduct cases in California's corrections system includes allegations that prison guards groped and grappled with inmates, brought them drugs, shared their booze and solicited them for sex. The two-volume report , created by the independent Office of Inspector General, chronicles 117 incidents within state prisons and 93 investigations from July to December 2012. It starts with a cook at a central California prison accused of asking inmates to sit on his lap, "tickle and fondle him. " It ends with the tale of a parole agent who shot the charging dog of his parolee.
IMAGE
May 21, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli, Matea Gold and Melanie Mason
WASHINGTON -- The former top official of the Internal Revenue Service told senators Tuesday he was “dismayed and saddened” by an inspector general's report detailing how, during his tenure as IRS commissioner, the agency inappropriately scrutinized targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status. Douglas Shulman, who ran the agency for five years before retiring in November 2012, appeared before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday morning, along with Steven T. Miller, who succeeded him as acting IRS chief, and J. Russell George, the Treasury inspector general for tax administration.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | United Press International
President Reagan on Friday named acting Inspector General Charles Gillum of the General Services Administration to be inspector general of the Small Business Administration. Gillum, 47, would succeed Mary Wieseman.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Director-adapter Michael Schlitt's version of "The Inspector General," Nikolai Gogol's tale of mistaken identity in 19th century czarist Russia, inhabits the realm of the absurd, peopled with grotesque human monsters. As presented at the Actors' Gang, its results are mixed: a well-considered, elegantly hilarious first act followed by an unrestrained, excessively indulgent second act. A tighter second half would really lift this well-acted interpretation into absurdist heaven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
One of the longtime civilian monitors for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department defended his work Wednesday and said he should have his contract with the county renewed. Merrick Bobb's statements come a day after the new inspector general for the Sheriff's Department recommended the Board of Supervisors cut Bobb's contract, concluding that he and the agency's other monitor had limited success in helping the troubled department. In his letter to the board, Inspector General Max Huntsman said that over the years, Bobb had provided an "invaluable" outside perspective but in recent years his "influence has waned" and he had "little direct relationship with the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
The new inspector general for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is recommending that the county cut off its contracts with two longtime civilian monitoring agencies, concluding they had only limited success in helping the troubled department. If the board accepts his recommendations, it would mark the end of relationships with two of the nation's most widely respected police monitors. The inspector general, former prosecutor Max Huntsman, said that both Michael Gennaco and Merrick Bobb had their successes and were supported by well-intentioned staffers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2014 | By Robert Faturechi
The new inspector general for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is recommending that the county cut off its contracts with two longtime civilian monitoring agencies, concluding they had only limited success in helping the troubled department. If the board accepts his recommendations, it would mark the end of relationships with two of the nation's most widely respected police monitors. The inspector general, former L.A. County prosecutor Max Huntsman, said that both Michael Gennaco and Merrick Bobb had their successes and were supported by well-intentioned staffers.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
The U.S. Justice Department used faulty statistics to overstate its mortgage-fraud prosecution efforts and ranked mortgage-fraud last in its list of priorities despite public pledges to combat these types of crimes, an internal watchdog said Thursday.  The 52-page report by the Justice Department's inspector general found that for the fiscal years of 2009 through 2011, the federal law enforcement agency's effort to prosecute mortgage fraud...
OPINION
March 12, 2014 | Patt Morrison
At the top of the big whiteboard in his office, Andre Birotte Jr. has written "BHAGS," by which he means his aspirations as U.S. attorney for seven Southern California counties: "big hairy audacious goals. " He's already hit some audacious personal goals, this son of Haitian immigrants. He's made his way from the L.A. public defender's office to inspector general of the Los Angeles Police Department to private practice, and, since 2010, to chief of the most populous U.S. attorney's district in the nation.
OPINION
March 11, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Amid allegations of overbilling, environmental hazards and spiraling costs at the Belmont Learning Center in downtown L.A. in the late 1990s, the state Legislature created a separate investigative office within the Los Angeles Unified School District. The new inspector general was authorized to issue subpoenas, and charged with examining operations in the district with a piercing and unimpeded eye. But the position was authorized for only 15 years, until the end of 2014. The first inspector general reported on serious shortfalls in accountability and oversight at Belmont.
OPINION
March 26, 1995
After the 1965 Watts riots, the McCone Commission recommended the creation of an office of inspector general made up of civilians and Los Angeles police officers who would operate outside the regular LAPD chain of command. It would have handled all civilian complaints against officers, bringing credibility to the process, and it would have reported directly to the police chief. It was a good idea. It was never implemented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Abby Sewell
A Los Angeles County supervisor blasted her government attorneys Tuesday for not allowing her to see reports from internal investigations of deputy-involved shootings and other use-of-force incidents. Gloria Molina, who has frequently complained about the cost to the county of lawsuits alleging wrongdoing by the Sheriff's Department, said board members aren't getting information needed to decide whether taxpayers should pay to represent deputies in court. Molina wants other board members to support her request for Sheriff's Department investigation records related to a September 2013 deputy-involved shooting in East Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
The State Department did not violate conflict-of-interest rules when it chose an outside contractor to conduct an environmental impact study of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, the department's inspector general concluded in a report issued Wednesday. The conclusion came as a blow to environmental groups seeking to stop the pipeline's construction. They had urged an investigation of recent business ties between TransCanada, which plans to build it, and Environmental Resources Management, which conducted the environmental assessment.
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