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January 16, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
The long-awaited expansion of baseball's instant replay system has become a reality.  Major League Baseball announced Thursday that owners voted unanimously to subject most calls to instant replay, starting this year, after securing approval from unions representing players and umpires.  For the first time, teams will be allowed to show disputed or controversial plays on stadium video boards -- and not just the plays selected for review....
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SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
SAN DIEGO - The game between the Dodgers and San Diego Padres on Sunday broke in Major League Baseball's expanded instant replay system. Well, kind of. Neither team challenged a call in the Padres' 3-1 victory. Manager Don Mattingly didn't sound particularly concerned with the implementation of the new technology, even though it wasn't available to the Dodgers until they hosted the Angels on Thursday in the opening game of the Freeway Series. The new system wasn't in effect for the Dodgers' season-opening, two-game series in Australia against the Arizona Diamondbacks.
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SPORTS
September 22, 1990
What's wrong with instant replay? Communication, right? Mini-mikes don't work. Red flags won't work. What's wrong with simply flashing "review" on the multi-million dollar scoreboard so everyone knows what's going on. That would include the fans, the TV announcers and, of all people, the referee. After review, start a two-minute clock, then flash either "play stands" or "overruled," followed by a brief explanation, e.g. one foot out of bounds, knee down, etc. Ingenious. W.C. COHEN Encinitas
SPORTS
March 29, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
I liked Major League Baseball's decision to dramatically expand its use of instant replay, believing it was time for a sport that is often resistant to change to embrace technology the way the NFL, NBA and NHL have. But after seeing the replay process play out - rather clumsily at times - this spring, I'm less of a fan. The new system requires too many layers of evaluation and communication, and it is sure to disrupt the flow of games. First, the manager, in what amounts to an on-field filibuster, must initiate a discussion with an umpire to give his video coordinator time to review the play to determine whether the call should be challenged.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Starbucks Corp., the world's largest coffeehouse operator, will expand its Via Ready Brew instant coffees to all stores in the U.S. and Canada starting Sept. 29. The instant blends were introduced in March in Seattle, Chicago and London as part of an effort to get a piece of the $21-billion soluble coffee market, the company said. The coffees are available in two varieties -- bold and medium -- and are sold in packs of three servings for $2.95 or 12 for $9.95. Instant coffee accounts for about 40% of all cups made globally, according to Starbucks.
NEWS
September 30, 1997
Transformation can take place in an instant--from seer to seen, from matter to nothingness, from strangers to family. Don't blink.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1990
Flanigan and all other critics of the public schools must remember that schools are a reflection of society. As long as we seek instant gratification and instant wealth, there will be a problem with education. Generations laughed at the Protestant work ethic, and now we have a generation that values neither work nor ethics. When this changes, education will improve. IRENE WILLINGHAM Sun Valley
BUSINESS
October 7, 2001
I see where the cost of crude that is used to make gasoline is at a very low price right now ["Energy Chief Says Gas Supply Stable, May Boost Oil Reserve," Sept. 28]. How come the "instant overnight" price at the pump does not come down [overnight]? When the price of crude goes up a bit, the "instant overnight" phenom of a higher price kicks in in a nanosecond. What am I missing here? Ray P. Keesler La Crescenta
BUSINESS
July 13, 1987
A federal court jury in Boston ordered Polaroid to pay $9.75 to investors for each share of its stock they bought during six weeks in 1979, saying it had failed to disclose adverse financial information about its Polavision instant movie camera. The jury said damages must be paid to all investors who purchased Polaroid common stock between Jan. 11 and Feb. 22, 1979, and held that stock until the end of that period or longer.
SPORTS
July 6, 1985
Greg Louganis said that he doesn't come across larger than life. I beg to differ with him. He was the most accessible, friendliest athlete in the USC Olympic Village last summer. He arrived just after the village opened--unlike others who shunned it or came only occasionally. He was a frequent figure on Main Street and he chatted with everyone who approached. I can't accept the fact that he wouldn't be an instant hit in films. TROOP PETRONE Altadena
SPORTS
March 12, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Angels second baseman Howie Kendrick said he will have to be more cognizant of his glove-to-hand transfer on double plays this season after umpires overturned a call involving infielder Andrew Romine in Tuesday's exhibition game against the Seattle Mariners. With the bases loaded and one out in the eighth inning, Romine, playing second base, dropped the ball while trying to turn a double play. The play was initially ruled a force out, but the call was overturned after an instant-replay review, the umpires determining Romine did not have possession of the ball.
SPORTS
March 11, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Another day, another lengthy postgame meeting between Angels Manager Mike Scioscia and the umpires involving instant replay. Tuesday's discussion was sparked by an eighth-inning call that was overturned, the first of the numerous spring-training challenges involving the Angels that was actually changed. With the bases loaded and one out against the Seattle Mariners, Angels second baseman Andrew Romine dropped the ball while making the glove-to-hand transfer on a double-play attempt.
SPORTS
March 11, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Another day, another lengthy postgame meeting between Angels Manager Mike Scioscia and the umpires. The topic: once again, instant replay. The discussion Tuesday was sparked by an eighth-inning call that was overturned, the first of numerous spring-training challenges involving the Angels that was changed. With the bases loaded and one out, Angels second baseman Andrew Romine dropped the ball while making the glove-to-hand transfer on a double-play attempt. The play was initially ruled a force out. Seattle Manager Lloyd McClendon challenged, and after a 2-minute, 20-second review, umpires determined Romine did not have possession of the ball.
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - The new instant-replay and home-plate collision rules were the primary topics of the Angels' annual spring-training Players' Assn. meeting Sunday morning. There has been some confusion about the rules and how they've been implemented in exhibition games, and new union chief Tony Clark acknowledged a growing concern among players about whether the rules will enhance or detract from the game. Then, a few hours later, a fifth-inning play in the Angels' 3-1 victory over the Cincinnati Reds did nothing to ease the debate.
IMAGE
March 9, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Flanked by giant Carrera marble planters shaped like skulls, designer Paula Thomas stands in the courtyard of the first stand-alone boutique for her upscale global fashion brand, Thomas Wylde. "I love the dark and macabre, but I try to turn that into an aesthetic that is beautiful, alluring and abstract," says the British-born, Los Angeles-based Thomas, whose label merges a streetwise, rock 'n' roll vibe with feminine sophistication. Located next to company headquarters in Culver City, the store opened on Feb. 20, simultaneously celebrating Thomas' 48th birthday and the debut of a made-in-L.A.
SPORTS
March 6, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
TEMPE, Ariz. - By his own admission Don Mattingly hasn't spent a lot of time thinking about baseball's two newest rules, one allowing the use of instant replay and the other preventing catchers from blocking the plate if they don't have the ball. But the manager of the Dodgers has a new appreciation for both changes after they collided in the first inning of Thursday's 4-4 Cactus League tie with the Angels. After Mike Trout's one-out line drive squirted under a diving Yasiel Puig and rolled to the center-field wall, Trout tried to circle the bases, only to arrive back home at the same time the ball did. Umpire Gerry Davis called Trout out, sparking an immediate protest from Angels Manager Mike Scioscia, who had problems with both the call and catcher A.J. Ellis' position on the play.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2004
What your article on TV weather forecasters failed to tell ["A Hire Reality for TV News," by Lynn Smith, Nov. 29] was what these people do for the remaining 7 hours and 54 minutes of their workday. All the weather information a viewer or presenter could possibly want is available on the Internet in an instant. Carol May Los Angeles
SPORTS
November 9, 1985
Major league umpiring is getting worse each year and was a disaster in the World Series. One of the many bad calls directly determined the series winner. Why, then, is there so much opposition to instant TV replays as an aid in controversial plays? BEN CALLISON San Marcos
SPORTS
March 5, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
PHOENIX -- The Dodgers will get their first look at instant replay during their game Thursday against the Angels in Tempe, Ariz. But you get the impression the date was not circled in red on Manager Don Mattingly's calendar. Mattingly has so far declined to say who will review the video and advise the dugout when to challenge call and he was only slightly more forthcoming Wednesday. “For tomorrow we have a guy. It will be the video guy,” Mattingly said, referring to video coordinator Johnny Pratt.
SPORTS
March 3, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. -- C.J. Wilson, who likes to be on the cutting edge with his training techniques, is using new video technology this spring in an effort to sharpen his delivery. The Angels left-hander has been taking footage from practice on GoPro cameras that can be mounted to himself, a batter, a catcher, or even on a drone-like flying device that can hover several feet over his head. “It has a Bluetooth function so you can literally stand there with an iPad and watch playback of the video instantly,” said Wilson, who demonstrated the system after Monday morning's workout.
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