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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1993 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two of their children died in infancy, Tommy and Sarah Miles got over their heartache, gave up on nature and decided to adopt. They contacted the Los Angeles County Department of Children's Services and thought they were on their way. Concerned when a month had passed without a word from the caseworker, Sarah Miles called the county agency. "They lost our file. They had forgotten about us," she recalled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1993 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two of their children died in infancy, Tommy and Sarah Miles got over their heartache, gave up on nature and decided to adopt. They contacted the Los Angeles County Department of Children's Services and thought they were on their way. Concerned when a month had passed without a word from the caseworker, Sarah Miles called the county agency. "They lost our file. They had forgotten about us," she recalled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1985 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
To be black in Los Angeles before the 1950s, says Bernard Johnson, was to know Western Avenue as a two-lane blacktop barricade as impassable as the Gobi Desert and sometimes as inhospitable. For blacks, Western Avenue lacks the history of Central Avenue, where Johnson is director of the Dunbar Museum, the 1920s Art Deco hotel built exclusively for blacks turned away by white hotels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1985 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
To be black in Los Angeles before the 1950s, says Bernard Johnson, was to know Western Avenue as a two-lane blacktop barricade as impassable as the Gobi Desert and sometimes as inhospitable. For blacks, Western Avenue lacks the history of Central Avenue, where Johnson is director of the Dunbar Museum, the 1920s Art Deco hotel built exclusively for blacks turned away by white hotels.
NEWS
January 20, 1994
Westside Assemblywoman Gwen Moore (D-Los Angeles) has announced 16 local recipients of the Community Architect Awards, an honor her office gives every three years to residents and organizations who have demonstrated an exceptional commitment to bettering their community. Among those from Baldwin Hills and Crenshaw who will be honored at a reception Sunday are: * James Burk, director of the William Grant Still Arts Center. * Gary Jones, director of Blackstreet U.S.A. Puppet Theater. * St.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | ERIN J. AUBRY
Assemblywoman Gwen Moore (D-47th District) has announced 16 local recipients of the Community Architect Awards, an honor her office gives every three years to residents and organizations that have demonstrated an exceptional commitment to their community. Among those from Baldwin Hills and Crenshaw who will be honored at a Jan. 23 reception are: * James Burk, director of the William Grant Still Arts Center; * Gary Jones, director of Blackstreet U.S.A. Puppet Theater; * St.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1996
Re "The Beat Gets Heat for 'House Party' Skit," (Oct. 10). Unfortunately, those who have the loudest voices are not always the ones with the correct information. KKBT's "House Party" has several skits that might be considered controversial. "Little Crackhead" is, first and foremost, hilariously funny. If any thinking person takes the time to listen, he or she might see the irony and fun in the skits. I am a single, black female with three adult children: Two of whom are college graduates (Morehouse and Tuskegee)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1997 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Quintanilla, former director of the Hispanic Family Institute, has a different take on what it means to be adopted. For years Quintanilla and a handful of social workers scoured the city as part of a successful program encouraging Latino families to adopt and take in Latino foster children. But then last year disaster struck. The institute--the state's first private Latino adoption and foster care agency--was forced to close its doors in East Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following the recent arrests of two Los Angeles County foster mothers--one of whom allegedly killed the toddler she cared for--the head of the county's child welfare agency is proposing that all potential foster parents undergo psychological testing and receive mandatory training in child care.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
Nobody seemed to want her. Not even her mother, a cocaine addict who gave birth to the baby girl at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center and then left her there, struggling for life in the neonatal ward alongside a dozen other drug babies. Dr. Xylina Bean, a pediatrics professor at the hospital, said she tried for weeks to find an "ideal" family that would consider taking in the infant, who spent her first days of life quivering from drug withdrawal. But after five months of caring for the baby, who never seemed to stop crying, Bean was losing hope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Long Beach foster mother has been charged with the attempted murder of her 19-month-old foster daughter, who suffered head injuries so severe that authorities say she may be mentally and physically disabled for life. The arrest Monday of Mary Lee Walker, 34, came one month after another Los Angeles County foster mother was charged with murder in the beating death of a 23-month old toddler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1993 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 9-year-old black child in Chicago was asked last summer what he wanted to be when he grows up. His answer broke Brenda Girton's heart. "I don't think I'm going to grow up," the child replied. "Everyone around me is dying."
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