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BUSINESS
April 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Pfizer Inc. said it would finance a three-year, $14-million project with four universities and Entelos Inc. to study how insulin affects diabetes and obesity. New York-based Pfizer said its academic partners were Caltech, UC Santa Barbara, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Massachusetts. Entelos, based in Foster City, Calif., uses computer modeling to test the likely effects of new drugs.
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BUSINESS
December 8, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
MannKind Corp. in Valencia is attempting to revolutionize the treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes with its first product: an inhaled form of insulin powder called Afrezza that would eliminate the need for most injections. The company hopes to get federal approval for the Afrezza inhaler system by spring. The company's future and that of its 246 employees are riding on that goal. The dream of an inhaled form of insulin treatment dates from the 1920s, when doctors and researchers worried that diabetes patients wouldn't want to subject themselves to regular injections.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Diabetics who take human insulin produced by genetic engineering techniques are no more prone to dangerous side effects than if they take insulin derived from animals, a team of British physicians reported last week in the Lancet. The study is the first to test the two types of insulin on patients who specifically complained of problems when switched from animal to bioengineered drugs.
SCIENCE
October 28, 2013 | By Monte Morin
German doctors have successfully implanted insulin-producing cells in a patient with Type 1 diabetes using a specially constructed chamber system that does not require the use of immunosuppresant drugs, according to a new study. In a paper published Monday in the journal PNAS, researchers said the islets, or clusters of cells, remained alive for 10 months and were not rejected by the 56-year-old patient's immune system. However, the implantation offered only moderate health improvements and requires further refinement.
TRAVEL
September 27, 1987
Would like to add a footnote to the excellent Bill Hughes "The Mature Traveler" article of Sept. 13. For traveling diabetics taking NPH U100 insulin, there is none to be had in Europe. I have tried in Greece, Austria and in the London Harrods pharmacy and five stores in the Boots chain. They have never heard of it, so take along enough to last your entire trip. HELEN RITER BOWLES Redlands
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - California schools may give students insulin injections and other medications without having to call in licensed nurses, the state's highest court ruled Monday. "California law expressly permits trained, unlicensed school personnel to administer prescription medications such as insulin in accordance with the written statements of a student's treating physician and parents," Justice Kathryn Mickle Werdegar wrote for the California Supreme Court. The unanimous decision was a defeat for the powerful California Nurses Assn., which had argued that only licensed healthcare workers could administer medicine under a state law that bars the unauthorized practice of nursing.
HEALTH
September 13, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Inhaling a concentrated cloud of insulin through the nose twice a day appears to slow — and in some cases reverse — symptoms of memory loss in people with early signs of Alzheimer's disease, a new pilot study has found. The study involved only 104 people and is considered very preliminary. But it suggests that a safe, simple and cheap measure that boosts flagging metabolism in key areas of the brain could hold off or possibly derail the progression of the devastating neurological disorder in its early stages.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Diet researchers reported Tuesday that patients who had recently lost weight seemed to burn calories more efficiently in the crucial weight-maintenance phase when they ate a low-carbohydrate, Atkins-style diet than they did when they ate a traditional, higher-carblow-fat diet.  The small but intensive study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , showed through various measurements of energy expenditure that patients burned about 300 more calories a day on a low-carb diet than they did on thelow-fat diet.
TRAVEL
February 21, 2010 | By CATHARINE HAMM, On The Spot
Question: I have to give myself medically necessary injections. I carry a note from my doctor stating that the injections are prescribed. What would happen if the Transportation Security Administration opened my luggage, checked or carry-on, and found needles inside? Richard Showstack Newport Beach Answer: Assuming the syringes are for a legitimate medical purpose -- and in Showstack's case, they are -- probably nothing, says Suzanne Treviño, a spokeswoman for the TSA. "We come across this every day with passengers who have special needs," she says.
SCIENCE
April 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Argentine scientists said this week that they had created four cloned and genetically modified calves capable of producing human insulin in their milk, a step they said could cut the cost of treating diabetes. The newborn Jersey heifers will start producing the human hormone when they reach adulthood, said the biotechnology company behind the project, Bio Sidus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - California schools may give students insulin injections and other medications without having to call in licensed nurses, the state's highest court ruled Monday. "California law expressly permits trained, unlicensed school personnel to administer prescription medications such as insulin in accordance with the written statements of a student's treating physician and parents," Justice Kathryn Mickle Werdegar wrote for the California Supreme Court. The unanimous decision was a defeat for the powerful California Nurses Assn., which had argued that only licensed healthcare workers could administer medicine under a state law that bars the unauthorized practice of nursing.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
A "reverse vaccine" that allows people with Type 1 diabetes to produce their own insulin has passed its first test with human subjects, according to a new study. The success points to a potential new strategy for treating those in the early stages of the disease, experts said. The therapy is designed to protect cells in the pancreas that make insulin, a hormone the body needs to convert sugars and starches into energy. In people with Type 1 diabetes, the immune system goes haywire and attacks those crucial insulin-producing cells for reasons that medical researchers don't understand.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Diet researchers reported Tuesday that patients who had recently lost weight seemed to burn calories more efficiently in the crucial weight-maintenance phase when they ate a low-carbohydrate, Atkins-style diet than they did when they ate a traditional, higher-carblow-fat diet.  The small but intensive study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , showed through various measurements of energy expenditure that patients burned about 300 more calories a day on a low-carb diet than they did on thelow-fat diet.
SCIENCE
June 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
For Terra Hillyer, who has Type 1 diabetes, enrolling in a clinical trial for a new medical device called the artificial pancreas provided a glimpse of what life might be like without the constant checks of blood sugar levels and infusions of insulin that currently mark her days. “The first thing I do when I wake up is check my blood sugar,” Hillyer says. “It is the background noise of my life.” Except for one day recently, when the mother of two checked into the Sansum Diabetes Research Institute in Santa Barbara.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Diabetes affects more than 25 million Americans. New medications and strategies to treat the disease are greatly needed. But the jury is still out on the experimental medication dapagliflozin. The medication looks to have significant benefits and risks, according to a study published Monday. Dapagliflozin is being developed by Bristol-Myers-Squibb Co. in partnership with AstraZeneca. It represents a new class of diabetes medications called selective renal sodium glucose contransporter inhibitors.
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Even as Republican presidential candidates vow to dismantle what they call "Obamacare" -- the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 -- some of the law's key provisions are making their way onto the medical landscape. The latest step toward implementing the law came Thursday, as the Food and Drug Administration issued draft rules that will open the U.S. marketplace to "biosimilars" -- essentially generic versions of medications made with living, often bioengineered, organisms.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2008 | From Reuters
Eli Lilly & Co. said Friday that it would terminate development of an inhaled insulin treatment for diabetes, which it was conducting in partnership with Alkermes Inc., after deciding that the product's potential for commercial success wasn't strong enough. Lilly's decision marks the third setback in recent months for inhaled insulin formulations, once deemed potential blockbuster products because of their greater convenience than standard injectable insulin. Cambridge, Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
High doses of insulin appear to at least temporarily prevent the destruction of cells in the pancreas that causes the most common form of diabetes among children. Researchers at the University of South Florida Health Sciences Center in Tampa gave 12 children who had just been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes four times the usual dose of the hormone insulin for two weeks.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
An intermittent low-carb diet could be better than a standard low-calorie Mediterranean diet for weight loss and lowering insulin, a study finds. Low-carb diets have been shown in a number of studies to be superior to regular low-calorie diets for various weight health outcomes, but they're notoriously difficult to stick to for a number of people. In this study, researchers followed 115 women who had a family history of breast cancer for four months as they were randomly assigned to one of three diet programs.
NEWS
December 1, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
On Thursday the Food and Drug Administration issued draft guidelines for researchers and manufacturers working to develop and build an artificial pancreas to help patients with Type 1 diabetes control their blood sugar. About 3 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes, which develops when cells in the pancreas stop producing enough insulin to control blood sugar.  Patients with the disease must monitor their blood glucose aggressively.  If it goes too high, they have to carefully calculate how much insulin they need to bring it in line -- and then get an injection.  If a person with Type 1 diabetes' blood sugar drops too low, he or she could require a dose of another hormone, glucagon, to raise it back up. The unrelenting and error-prone process can be exhausting, so patient advocacy groups such as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation have been pushing the development of an artificial pancreas that would tightly control blood sugar levels much as the actual organ: monitoring glucose levels continually and automatically delivering the right dose of insulin, through a pump, into the body.  The system would work by connecting the monitoring system to a computer, which in turn would calculate the correct insulin dose and send a signal to the insulin pump to deliver the needed hormones.
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