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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Diabetics given a new pancreas to eliminate the need for insulin shots may also end up with healthier kidneys, six Minneapolis doctors reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The discovery supports a long-held belief that if diabetics could carefully control their blood-sugar level, they might be able to avoid the kidney failure, blindness and other serious health problems that appear in many longtime sufferers of the disease.
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HEALTH
October 26, 2009 | Marni Jameson
Simply put, diabetes is a contest between people and their blood. For people whose bodies don't produce enough insulin to manage their blood sugar, the goal is a normal blood score, achieved through a balancing act of lifestyle and medication. "Eventually most patients will follow a course of lifestyle, medications, then insulin," said Dr. Enrico Cagliero, referring to people diagnosed with the most common form of diabetes, known as Type 2. He's an endocrinologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1986 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
In the first trial studies of their kind in the United States, diabetes specialists from UC Irvine and Johns Hopkins University have been given approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to surgically implant insulin pumps, UCI officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
Kids with obese parents are known to be at increased risk of childhood obesity themselves. Moms with unhealthy diets have been shown to pass along metabolic problems to their kids, but exactly how dads fit into the equation is unclear. In humans, this is particularly difficult because fathers and children often share not just genes, but a home environment as well. Thankfully, we have rats to help sort this out. Australian researchers fed some male rats a high-fat diet and kept others on a healthy diet.
NEWS
June 22, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor spoke out this week about her Type 1 diabetes, calling attention to the issue—a condition that as many as 3 million Americans know well. The pinpricks for blood, the glucose monitors, the insulin injections… Daily life isn’t easy, the Supreme Court justice told a gathering of children with diabetes. An online diabetic community would seem to agree. This from the blog Cure Moll : “When I was 10, my mom and I were used to shots, we knew the perfect amount of insulin for everything, from a small piece of pizza and cake at a birthday party to simply cereal for breakfast.
HEALTH
November 1, 2010 | By Amanda Leigh Mascarelli, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Every night, Edward Damiano wakes three to four times to monitor his 11-year-old son's blood sugar levels. Damiano administers insulin remotely through a pump when his son's blood sugar reading is high or gives him juice through a straw when his blood sugar falls. His son, David, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 11 months old, sleeps peacefully through it all ? and that's exactly what worries Damiano. "You can check his blood sugar all night long and he won't wake up," Damiano says.
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