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Insulin

HEALTH
March 22, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
More than 70 years after insulin was found to be a treatment for diabetes, doctors still are trying to figure out a better way to get the hormone into the bodies of people who need it -- one that doesn't require needle sticks several times a day. Finally, non-injectable insulin appears within reach. An inhaled form may be available within a year or two, and an even bigger improvement -- an insulin capsule or tablet -- could be on pharmacy shelves within five years.
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SCIENCE
September 22, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Adding insulin injections to oral diabetes drugs does not bring most patients with Type 2 diabetes into control of their blood-sugar levels, according to early results from a major British study released Friday. The study is the first designed to determine which type of insulin should be used initially in such patients, and researchers concluded that a single daily injection of long-acting insulin was better than shots two or three times a day at meals.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
Can David succeed where Goliath failed? A little-known local biotech company developing an inhalable version of insulin for diabetics received ominous news recently: The world's biggest drug company by sales said its inhaler device bombed at the drugstore. The high-profile failure of Pfizer Inc.'s Exubera is considered one of the biggest flops in modern pharmaceutical history.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2007 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
A Valencia-based pharmaceutical start-up that is attempting to develop an inhaled form of insulin saw its shares plunge 16% on Friday amid news that it was depleting its cash reserves and was unlikely to find new investors soon. MannKind Corp. also postponed its earnings report to Thursday and said Chief Financial Officer Richard L. Anderson, 68, would retire by the end of 2008. The results had been scheduled to be released Friday. Shares fell $1.73 to $8.87, a two-year low.
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | JAN HOFMANN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A year and a half ago, diabetic Cyndie Flores of Garden Grove was losing ground fast, and she knew it. The red blood vessels in her eyes "looked like they were going to rupture," a warning sign of diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness in people ages 20 to 74. Her feet tingled with the sensation of pins and needles, a signal that nerve damage was beginning to take place in her extremities.
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Canadian researchers have successfully freed eight diabetics from insulin dependence by using a new combination of anti-rejection drugs to transplant insulin-secreting islet cells. All of the subjects have remained insulin-free for four to 15 months, a remarkable rate, because fewer than one in 10 patients who received islet transplants previously were able to escape their daily shots. "This is perhaps the most important finding in Type 1 diabetes research in the past decade," said Dr.
HEALTH
October 26, 2009 | Marni Jameson
By harnessing the power of lifestyle, the following people are managing their Type 2 diabetes without insulin, and in some cases without any medication at all. Some made the commitment when they were first diagnosed, but others reversed a condition that had been spiraling downward for years. Here's how they did it: "I'm controlled, not cured, but I'm not going back." Aaron Snyder, San Diego Age: 31 Occupation: Commodities analyst for Shell Oil Diagnosed: 10 years ago. (Diabetes is diagnosed by a fasting blood sugar of higher than 126 and an A1C of 6.5 or higher.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2008 | Tiffany Hsu, Times Staff Writer
Valencia biotechnology company MannKind Corp. thought it had encouraging news about its experimental insulin inhaler on Tuesday. But Wall Street wasn't buying it. For months, skeptical traders have expressed concern that the diabetes drug, if approved by the Food and Drug Administration, might end up with an FDA cancer advisory. Fears that the inhaler would never take off were still lurking Tuesday, even though MannKind said that trials of its Technosphere insulin delivery system showed no elevated cancer risk.
HEALTH
January 22, 2001 | PATRICIA KING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joseph Dell'Alba says he wasn't looking for "eternal life." But the 76-year-old, semiretired businessman was looking for a better way to deal with his heart disease. For almost two decades he had been bouncing in and out of the hospital for bypass surgery, angioplasty and medication. Dell'Alba had gotten to the point where it was a struggle to walk the 200 feet to his mailbox in rural Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | BILL VOGRIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In 1922, Urvan Ubben's parents had his "funeral picture" taken, certain he would be the next family member to die of diabetes. Today, the 77-year-old laughs at the childhood photo and how he cheated death by being one of the first people to test insulin. Experts say he may be the world's oldest surviving diabetic. "I was one of the guinea pigs when Eli Lilly was trying to mass-produce insulin in Indianapolis back in 1922," Ubben said. "In those days, they figured that if you had diabetes, you didn't have a chance.
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