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OPINION
September 30, 2011
State law requires insurers to include coverage for autism in comprehensive healthcare policies. Now, lawmakers want to go a step further, requiring coverage of a particular autism treatment: applied behavioral analysis. Insurers are resisting. They don't question the effectiveness of the therapy; they just say it doesn't fit the definition of "medical" treatment. Their position reflects how crucial parts of the healthcare system are wedded to the status quo, regardless of what's best for patients.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1990
The supporters of Proposition 103 were foolish to believe that any action short of recalling insurance commissioner Roxani Gillespie would provide relief from rising insurance companies. Her lame-duck actions reveal that the system doesn't have checks and balances, rather it favors the checks that don't bounce and large insurance companies' account balances. J. BRIAN AMSTER, Newport Beach
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012 | By Chad Terhune
California's doctors, hospitals and insurance companies launched their campaign Monday against a proposed ballot measure seeking tighter regulation of health insurance rates and proponents quickly returned fire. The proposed ballot initiative seeks to give the California Department of Insurance the same rate-setting authority over health insurance that it already holds over auto and property policies. This issue has generated strong interest among many consumers hit with significant rate hikes on their health coverage in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2009 | Jason Felch
In the top-floor ballroom of a downtown San Francisco hotel, Steve Slepcevic took the podium to share the story of his success. The son of Serbian immigrants, he began working on construction sites at the age of 12. By 17, he had started his own general contracting business. Soon enough, he was chasing natural disasters, looking to help victims rebuild their property and put their lives back together.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1991 | Associated Press
New York state is investigating auto insurance companies for failing to give required discounts to consumers who have safety and anti-theft devices on their cars, officials said Friday. Attorney General Robert Abrams said car owners have been cheated out of as much as $30 million in New York--and more nationally--by insurance companies that advertise discounts and then don't give them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1988
Isn't it time for our government to start an InsureCare program so that, in addition to health care, people can buy automobile, household and other insurance at a reasonable, affordable price? If the government made only half the profit made by the insurance companies, it would go a long way toward paying off the deficit. So let the insurance companies in the private sector move to Siberia! MONROE RUBINGER Beverly Hills
NEWS
September 14, 1986 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
To outsiders, Everett and Betty Stumbaugh seemed happy with each other--somewhat secretive, to be sure, a bit odd perhaps--but nothing to make one suspect that he would strangle her, break her neck and then fake an auto accident to cover up the murder. But that apparently is what he did in the early morning hours of Aug. 12, investigators say. Two weeks later, as authorities were closing in, Everett Stumbaugh shot himself.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2004
Former financier Martin Frankel was sentenced to more than 16 years in prison for bilking seven insurance companies out of more than $200 million. Frankel, 50, had pleaded guilty in New Haven, Conn., to 24 federal charges of fraud and racketeering. He admitted plotting to loot seven insurance companies in Arkansas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Missouri and Tennessee that mostly sold funeral policies to the poor.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
Obamacare's biggest problem isn't the troubled HealthCare.gov website anymore. Consumers are easing up on criticism of government exchanges and turning their frustration and fury toward some of the nation's biggest health insurers. All too often, new policyholders say, the companies can't confirm coverage, won't answer basic questions, and haven't issued identification numbers needed to fill prescriptions or get medical care. Day after day, people say, they contact insurance company call centers waiting hours at a time with no response.
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