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OPINION
September 30, 2011
State law requires insurers to include coverage for autism in comprehensive healthcare policies. Now, lawmakers want to go a step further, requiring coverage of a particular autism treatment: applied behavioral analysis. Insurers are resisting. They don't question the effectiveness of the therapy; they just say it doesn't fit the definition of "medical" treatment. Their position reflects how crucial parts of the healthcare system are wedded to the status quo, regardless of what's best for patients.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2009 | Jason Felch
In the top-floor ballroom of a downtown San Francisco hotel, Steve Slepcevic took the podium to share the story of his success. The son of Serbian immigrants, he began working on construction sites at the age of 12. By 17, he had started his own general contracting business. Soon enough, he was chasing natural disasters, looking to help victims rebuild their property and put their lives back together.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2013 | By Lisa Zamosky
When David Brutman received a $3,000 bill for his wife's colonoscopy, he was angry and confused. He thought the cost would all be covered because under the Affordable Care Act most insurers must cover the full cost of preventive care such as check-ups, vaccinations and screenings. It seemed straightforward enough, yet Brutman, a 41-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur, learned the hard way that the lines are easily blurred when it comes to determining whether services are considered preventive care or treatments that require payment.
OPINION
February 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Gruber
The recent Congressional Budget Office report on healthcare reform has lots of good news. Insurance premiums are lower than anticipated, the Affordable Care Act will cost $9 billion less than previously estimated and the provision designed to buffer insurance companies from risk will actually raise revenue, not function as any sort of federal government bailout. But the good news has not gotten much attention because the CBO also projected that, within the next several years, healthcare reform may reduce employment and worker hours by the equivalent of about 2 million full-time positions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1990
The supporters of Proposition 103 were foolish to believe that any action short of recalling insurance commissioner Roxani Gillespie would provide relief from rising insurance companies. Her lame-duck actions reveal that the system doesn't have checks and balances, rather it favors the checks that don't bounce and large insurance companies' account balances. J. BRIAN AMSTER, Newport Beach
AUTOS
September 5, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Here's another item to add to the "That costs more in Los Angeles" list, and it isn't pretty: car insurance. The 10 most expensive ZIP Codes for car insurance in the state of California are all in the L.A. metro area. L.A. County is also the most expensive county in the state, while Beverly Hills wins the honor of most expensive city in the state to insure a vehicle. The findings are from a study commissioned by InsuranceQuotes.com. "Where you live is playing a big role in the rate you're paying," said Laura Adams, senior analyst for the website InsuranceQuotes.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1991 | Associated Press
New York state is investigating auto insurance companies for failing to give required discounts to consumers who have safety and anti-theft devices on their cars, officials said Friday. Attorney General Robert Abrams said car owners have been cheated out of as much as $30 million in New York--and more nationally--by insurance companies that advertise discounts and then don't give them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1988
Isn't it time for our government to start an InsureCare program so that, in addition to health care, people can buy automobile, household and other insurance at a reasonable, affordable price? If the government made only half the profit made by the insurance companies, it would go a long way toward paying off the deficit. So let the insurance companies in the private sector move to Siberia! MONROE RUBINGER Beverly Hills
BUSINESS
December 11, 2004
Former financier Martin Frankel was sentenced to more than 16 years in prison for bilking seven insurance companies out of more than $200 million. Frankel, 50, had pleaded guilty in New Haven, Conn., to 24 federal charges of fraud and racketeering. He admitted plotting to loot seven insurance companies in Arkansas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Missouri and Tennessee that mostly sold funeral policies to the poor.
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