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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997
Re "Quake Victims Denounce Insurers," Oct. 8: Insurance companies are neither benevolent societies nor our "good neighbors." They are businesses whose purpose is to sell products and make money doing so. Their products are not simple, unfortunately. They often come with endless and complicated conditions--exclusions, claims procedures, deadlines and more exclusions. If one's insurance claim is rejected because he failed to meet a basic, 12-month deadline, then he learns a sad and costly lesson.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 17, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Opinions about Mercury General Corp. often depend on whether they're coming from investors or consumers. The Los Angeles automobile and homeowner insurance company has been at the center of repeated attempts to amend California's landmark Proposition 103, which made automobile insurance a more regulated industry. For more than a decade, Mercury's founder and chairman, George Joseph, has clashed repeatedly with consumer advocate Harvey Rosenfield, author of the landmark proposition, before the California Department of Insurance, the courts, the Legislature and on the ballot.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
The state of California is likely to receive tens of millions of dollars more from insurance companies to clean up the Stringfellow Acid Pits toxic waste dump as a result of a ruling Thursday by the California Supreme Court. In a unanimous decision, the high court said consecutive insurance policies by various companies required each to pay up to their policy limits for damage caused by the Riverside County waste site. The companies wanted to restrict liability to just a share of the damage that occurred during the time each insurer's policy was in effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
An insurance company has sued the Los Angeles Unified School District seeking to avoid paying settlement costs related to alleged child abuse at Miramonte Elementary School. The action, if successful, could leave the nation's second-largest school system on the hook for an estimated $30 million that it agreed to pay to 58 alleged victims of former teacher Mark Berndt. At least as many claims remain unresolved, with attorneys seeking higher compensation than the settlement provides.
OPINION
August 2, 2009
Re "How an overhaul might affect you," July 27 Sadly, this "clarification" of healthcare plans in the works describes perfectly an obstacle course that simply doesn't have to be. What ought to be a straight shot from Point A to Point B -- everyone kicks in according to how much they benefit from living and working in this great country, and all have coverage no matter what illness or injury befalls them -- is being turned into the same kind of...
BUSINESS
May 15, 1985
The state filed suit against the firms that sold Baldwin-United annuities in Georgia between 1981 and 1983. The suit, filed in Fulton County Superior Court under the state's Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations statute, seeks the forfeiture of about $2.25 million in commissions earned by the firms on sales to Georgia residents. Before it filed for bankruptcy protection in 1983, Baldwin-United was one of the nation's leading marketers of single-premium deferred annuities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1998
A dentist was charged in federal court Wednesday with a fraudulent billing scheme in which insurance companies paid out tens of thousands of dollars for services never performed. To avoid detection, federal prosecutors said, Julie Valentine used a mail drop to receive letters from the insurance companies to her patients seeking verification of services. She also was accused of "upcoding"--billing for procedures that were more expensive than those actually performed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999
A Beverly Hills doctor accused of submitting false insurance claims on behalf of patients given nose jobs, tummy tucks and other cosmetic surgeries pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to mail fraud. Alvin Reiter, 55, was one of five cosmetic surgeons charged this month for billing insurance companies for procedures not covered by patients' health plans. "We hope these cases serve as a wake-up call to cosmetic surgeons" said Assistant U.S. Atty. Jack Weiss.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1995 | Steve Hochman
Is a punk concert really a punk concert without a roiling mosh pit and daredevil body surfing and stage diving? Punk bands and fans of the resurgent, aggressive style may have to find out in the not-too-distant future. A growing stream of lawsuits concerning mosh-related injuries is leading insurance companies to crack the whip--and raise their rates--on vulnerable promoters and performers. Last year, at least two fans were paralyzed due to mosh-related injuries at U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1999 | LOUISE ROUG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two insurance companies have agreed to pay Westminster $4 million to replace a water tank that ruptured last fall, injuring six people and causing millions of dollars of property damage. "This is a major step of forward," City Manager Don Vestal said. "The demolition of the tank a couple of weeks ago was a significant milestone. This settlement is another." The water tank on Hefley Square burst Sept. 21, unleashing 5 million gallons of water and leaving more than 30 families homeless.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2013 | David Lazarus
So this is what socialism looks like: Private companies competing for people's business in an open marketplace. Californians got their first glimpse Thursday of what insurers plan to charge for coverage to be offered next year to about 5 million state residents who don't receive health insurance from employers. In southern Los Angeles County, for example, Health Net is charging $242 a month for one of its plans. Blue Shield is charging $287 and Kaiser Permanente $325 for the same coverage.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard and Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - As Bank of America Corp. pulls itself free from a swamp of mortgage liabilities, new troubles keep threatening to suck it back under. BofA agreed to settle a big insurer's claims over faulty mortgage bonds for $1.7 billion Monday. But it found itself threatened with new legal action for failing to abide by a landmark settlement aimed at saving homeowners from foreclosure. The Charlotte, N.C., bank said it would settle a lawsuit dating from the financial crisis with mortgage insurance specialist MBIA Inc. The insurer had been pressing BofA for more than $5 billion in damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
The state of California is likely to receive tens of millions of dollars more from insurance companies to clean up the Stringfellow Acid Pits toxic waste dump as a result of a ruling Thursday by the California Supreme Court. In a unanimous decision, the high court said consecutive insurance policies by various companies required each to pay up to their policy limits for damage caused by the Riverside County waste site. The companies wanted to restrict liability to just a share of the damage that occurred during the time each insurer's policy was in effect.
NEWS
July 25, 2012 | By Paul Whitefield
When I was a lad, I suffered from asthma. And on more than one occasion, the doctor in my small town made a trip to our house - usually in the evening - to treat me. No, really. Healthcare in the U.S. has come a long way since then - and not necessarily in a good way. Take Wednesday's story in The Times: "[S]ome healthcare companies are starting to shift clinical services and decision-making on medical care overseas, primarily to India and the Philippines. " Yikes!
BUSINESS
July 25, 2012 | Don Lee
After years of shipping data-processing, accounting and other back-office work abroad, some healthcare companies are starting to shift clinical services and decision-making on medical care overseas, primarily to India and the Philippines. Some of the jobs being sent abroad include so-called pre-service nursing, in which nurses at insurance firms, for example, help assess patient needs and determine treatment methods. Outsourcing such tasks goes beyond earlier steps by healthcare firms to farm out reading of X-rays and other diagnostic tests to health professionals overseas.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
A major health insurance company has settled an enforcement action with state regulators over providing special therapy for autism patients. California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones on Tuesday said that Blue Shield of California Life & Health Insurance Co. agreed to immediately cover the cost of applied behavior analysis therapy, which Jones described as a well-recognized and effective treatment. The settlement with the Insurance Department stems from a dispute that began in July when Jones filed an enforcement action against Blue Shield.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The government of Taiwan will allow five U.S. insurance companies to set up branch offices in 1991, stiffening foreign competition in an already ferocious battle for market share, analysts said today. The Finance Ministry has approved applications by Time Insurance Co., American Security Insurance Co., New York Life Insurance & Annuity Co., John Hancock Variable Life Insurance Co. and Manufacturers Life Insurance Co. of America, officials said. The approvals bring to 20 the number of U.S.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1987
The dispute arose over coverage for claims against the company for asbestos-related health problems. GAF had sued the insurers in California state court in 1979, claiming they were required to provide coverage in all present and future asbestos cases filed against the company. The company did not disclose the amount of the settlement, reached with Insurance Co. of North America, a unit of Cigna Corp.
NEWS
February 6, 2011 | By P.J. Huffstutter, Los Angeles Times
The federal investigator took the witness stand and described the crime scene: a sprawling field clogged with boulders, native grasses and knee-high sagebrush. The defendant, a California farmer, had said the site was a 200-acre wheat field. But the investigator found no tilled soil, no tractors, no plows. In fact, she testified, she found no wheat. The field was just a field ? and a prime example, federal prosecutors allege, of a wave of agricultural insurance scams sprouting across the nation.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Nearly four years ago, state authorities forced out top-level officials at the government-run workers' compensation insurance firm, revamped the operation and launched a criminal investigation into reports of conflicts of interest, self-dealing and misuse of as much as $1billion. Today, that probe involving the State Compensation Insurance Fund continues in silence as prosecutors face possible statutes of limitations that would bar some criminal charges and civil lawsuits. The last publicly known activity occurred 18 months ago, when a search warrant was issued on a former board member in Redding, about 150 miles north of Sacramento.
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