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Insurgency

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OPINION
July 27, 2005
The July 25 Column One ("Shots to the Heart of Iraq") describing American soldiers' accidental harming of Iraqi civilians was a brilliant propaganda piece for the insurgency. By describing in prominent detail the failures of our soldiers over there (while ignoring their successes), The Times only encourages the terrorists to continue their efforts, knowing that the Americans, and not terrorists, will be blamed by the Western media for the continuing violence. If I didn't know better, I would think that The Times, at least based on this article, is a branch of Al Jazeera.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Comparing illegal immigration to a war that threatened the United States' future, GOP gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly once exhorted citizens to rise and join his fight to stop people from crossing the border, according to audio of a speech he gave in 2006. "I am a descendant of Jim Bowie, who died at the Alamo," Donnelly, then a leader in the Minuteman border-patrol group, said at a rally in Temecula that year. "It is rumored that he took a dozen Mexican soldiers to their deaths before they finally killed him. How many of you will rise up and take his place on that wall?"
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WORLD
April 4, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
The Islamic teacher sat on the wooden porch of his house smiling politely, his infant son playing at his feet. Those who study the Koran are automatically suspect, Dul Nasir Hama said, adding that he's not a terrorist nor are his students part of the insurgency. As he spoke, a Thai army patrol skirted the grounds of his madrasa in Pattani, a jungle area of southern Thailand with a long history of violent clashes between Malay Muslims and Thai Buddhists. "They're afraid to come in here," he said.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | Sarah Chayes
On Feb. 20, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan fired his respected central bank governor, who was trying to discover what had happened to an estimated $20 billion that disappeared from the nation's oil revenue over an 18-month period. Four days later, across the country in the parched northeast, members of the Boko Haram extremist group attacked a public boarding school, shooting children in their sleep and setting school buildings afire. It was the latest in a string of massacres by the group, whose statements call for an Islamic state ruled by sharia law in Nigeria.
WORLD
July 30, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
The Yemen summer has seethed with pitched battles and bloodshed, raising fears that the country will tumble into further disarray even as Washington has more than doubled its military and security aid. Gun fights and explosions break out in spasms across a nation at the dangerous intersection of the Middle East and the Horn of Africa. In the south, an Al Qaeda-linked network has carried out strategic attacks on security targets, while in the north, a rebel group has renewed fighting against rival tribes and government forces.
WORLD
September 9, 2010 | By Paul Richter and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Mexico's violent drug cartels increasingly resemble an insurgency with the power to challenge the government's control of wide swaths of its own soil, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Wednesday. Clinton's comments reflected a striking shift in the public comments of the Obama administration about the bloodshed that has cost 28,000 lives in Mexico since December 2006. They come as U.S. officials weigh a large increase in aid to the southern neighbor to help fight the cartels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Comparing illegal immigration to a war that threatened the United States' future, GOP gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly once exhorted citizens to rise and join his fight to stop people from crossing the border, according to audio of a speech he gave in 2006. "I am a descendant of Jim Bowie, who died at the Alamo," Donnelly, then a leader in the Minuteman border-patrol group, said at a rally in Temecula that year. "It is rumored that he took a dozen Mexican soldiers to their deaths before they finally killed him. How many of you will rise up and take his place on that wall?"
WORLD
December 30, 2003 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
The boys at the Arabian Gulf Elementary School knew what they were supposed to say when a visitor asked about the American soldiers occupying Iraq. With their teachers looking on approvingly, they waved their hands in excitement and jumped to their feet when called upon. "Since the Americans arrived we have only had problems," declared 12-year-old Mahmoud Ali, a rail-thin child with buckteeth. "We must resist them!" "We must force them to leave, with bombs, with explosives.
OPINION
October 19, 2010 | By Rachel Reid
The first question was the obvious one. Why are you known as Mullah Tractor? "I read one or two Islamic books, so people call me Mullah. And then I bought a tractor. So I am Mullah Tractor. " Mullah Tractor wore an orange jumpsuit, signaling maximum security. He looked to be about 60 years old, with thin downturned lips, a contoured nose that might once have been broken and a short black-and-white beard. His real name is Gul Shah Wazir, and he is in U.S. detention in Afghanistan, accused of being a member of the Taliban.
OPINION
September 20, 2010 | By Thomas E. McNamara
Washington and Mexico City are unsure whether Mexico today resembles Colombia's insurgency of 20 years ago. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton thinks it does; some Mexicans and, maybe, President Obama think not ("The wrong solution in Mexico," Opinion, Sept. 10). As the American ambassador in Colombia when the notorious drug lord Pablo Escobar was at riding high, and later when he was defeated, I side with Clinton in seeing many parallels. The parallels begin with the Colombia of the Escobar days being a large, progressive democracy with a vibrant economy.
WORLD
March 25, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - - Taliban insurgents opposed to Afghanistan's upcoming presidential vote stormed an election office in Kabul on Tuesday and killed five people, officials said. The sound of gunfire echoed across Kabul's Darul Aman neighborhood for several hours as insurgents battled Afghan security forces while dozens of election commission workers remained trapped in the building. At the end, authorities said 70 people were rescued from the siege but two police officers, two civilians and one candidate running for a provincial office were killed.
WORLD
March 16, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - Syrian forces have overrun a strategic rebel stronghold close to the Lebanese border, the military said Sunday, in the latest battlefield victory for the government of President Bashar Assad. The official news service reported that Syrian troops were in "full control" of Yabroud, a longtime rebel bastion and key logistics base for opposition supplies and insurgents entering Syria from Lebanese territory. Aiding Syrian troops in the battle were militiamen from Hezbollah, the Lebanese group that has dispatched units to fight alongside Assad's forces.
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Shashank Bengali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - A little-known Islamist militant group took responsibility for twin bombings hundreds of miles apart Friday that killed at least 19 people, wounded dozens and underscored the vulnerability of the Pakistani government's attempt to open peace talks with insurgents. In the provincial capital of Peshawar, near the northeastern tribal areas that border Afghanistan, a suicide bomber blew himself up in a bustling market on the city's outskirts as worshipers were gathering for prayers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
"Insurgent," the sequel to the upcoming dystopian action-adventure movie "Divergent," now has a director:  Robert Schwentke will helm the second installment of the film series starring Shailene Woodley and based on the bestselling young-adult book trilogy by Veronica Roth, Summit Entertainment announced in a statement Tuesday. In "Divergent," which opens March 21, Woodley plays Beatrice "Tris" Prior,  a young warrior in a futuristic society in which citizens are divided into factions based on their personality types.
WORLD
January 5, 2014 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State John F. Kerry pledged Sunday to "do everything that is possible" to help Iraqi government forces in an escalating battle against Al Qaeda-linked insurgents in the western province of Anbar, but he said the Obama administration will not send American troops back to Iraq. After heavy fighting, Sunni Muslim militants fighting under the banner of Al Qaeda reportedly have in effect taken control of Fallouja and secured large parts of Ramadi, the province's most important cities.
WORLD
January 4, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A NATO soldier was killed Saturday when insurgents attacked a military base in eastern Afghanistan, officials said. Five insurgents launched the early-morning assault on a joint Afghan-NATO base in Ghani Khel, a district in Afghanistan's Nangarhar province. One attacker detonated a Toyota Corolla packed with explosives at the entrance while four others tried to storm the base, said Ahmad Zia Abdulzai, a spokesman for the provincial governor. A 40-minute firefight ensued, and when it was over the militants lay dead at the scene, Abdulzai said.
WORLD
July 9, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez and Zulfiqar Ali, Los Angeles Times
Suicide bomb explosions tore through a busy market Friday in a volatile tribal region of Pakistan, killing more than 65 people in an attack that illustrated the Taliban's potency despite several recent military offensives against the insurgents. The blasts took place in the village of Yakka Ghund outside the offices of a senior administrator for the Mohmand tribal region, police said. At least 112 people were injured. Authorities said one of the bombers was on a motorcycle and the other detonated a Toyota Corolla sedan filled with explosives.
WORLD
July 8, 2005 | Asmaa Waguih, Special to The Times
The road home for Abdulla Muhammadi is filled with military checkpoints and suspicious glares. Every time the 31-year-old electronics salesman approaches the barbed wire and wrecked buildings of his hometown of Fallouja, he faces wary Iraqi and U.S. troops who guard each entrance to the city and search all arriving vehicles and people. He and others must sometimes wait for hours to get in.
WORLD
December 29, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence agencies warn in a new, classified assessment that insurgents could quickly regain control of key areas of Afghanistan and threaten the capital as soon as 2015 if American troops are fully withdrawn next year, according to two officials familiar with the findings. The National Intelligence Estimate, which was given recently to the White House, has deeply concerned some U.S. officials. It represents the first time the intelligence community has formally warned that the Afghan government could face significantly more serious attacks in Kabul from a resurgent Taliban within months of a U.S. pullout, the officials said, speaking anonymously to discuss classified material.
OPINION
September 22, 2013 | By David Schenker
Most of the attention these days is on Syria, but there is also a growing problem in Egypt with global implications. Nine Egyptian policemen were wounded by a bomb in the northern Sinai Peninsula on Monday. The week before, suicide bombers killed nine soldiers in the peninsula. Shootings, kidnappings and bombings - roadside, car and suicide - have become routine occurrences in Sinai. And the burgeoning Islamist insurgency is spreading to other parts of Egypt. In early September, the interior minister narrowly survived a car-bomb attack in Cairo reportedly perpetrated by a Sinai-based jihadist group.
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