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Integration

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2000 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a Pasadena school board member in the early 1970s, Al Lowe led a bitter fight to integrate that city's schools and was later ousted from office for his stand. More recently, the Chinese American businessman helped change the structure of the Tournament of Roses Assn. to make it more open to minorities--who have been residents of Pasadena for generations but were long barred from many city clubs and facilities.
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NEWS
April 7, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It costs $7 a year to attend the public school here, a faded red-brick campus where officials can't even afford to mow the playing field. But amid the prickly weeds and teeming anthills, Jacob Sebatane is plotting his future as an international rugby star. Sebatane, 18, got started last year by writing to the South African Rugby Football Union, the game's rich and powerful governing body. I want to play rugby, he wrote, but my school has no money. Can you help?
NEWS
May 27, 1994 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kissing their parents goodby, hugging lunch boxes and notebooks, 300 Jewish children pour into the I.E. Lichtigfeld primary school each morning through an iron gate and electric doors with bomb-proof glass. Police patrol the streets around the school in the city's lush West End neighborhood while video cameras monitor its hallways. Inside, a few boys don yarmulkes and sit down with girls in ponytails for reading, writing and arithmetic, Hebrew and Judaism.
NEWS
January 28, 1996 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a slow day at the Arcade Barbershop that serves Ladera Heights, an affluent community of several thousand homes tucked between Culver City and Inglewood. A handful of long-time customers, all of them white, trickle in for an old-fashioned haircut, to listen to a radio playing music from the 1930s and '40s and talk about how the neighborhood is changing. "A Greek fellow, an old-timer who lived down the street from me, moved the other day," one elderly customer says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
The Ocean View School District board has scaled back a desegregation plan being implemented last fall, eliminating a magnet program that had been designed to attract white students to a predominantly Latino elementary school. The district revised its proposed plan because of a state Court of Appeal decision last June that relaxed racial desegregation requirements for schools.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | LIANNE HART and RAY DELGADO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal officials Thursday moved four black families into an all-white public housing complex in Vidor, Tex., that had been seized by the government when an earlier integration attempt failed. Police stood guard as three moving vans and at least three carloads of black motorists drove up to the 74-unit complex. Housing and Urban Development officials said four families--two single women with children, one single woman and one single man--moved into the complex before dawn.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2006 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
For 35 years under court order, the yellow buses have picked up black children from the city's Oxmoor Valley and carried them up the hill and across city limits to affluent, mostly white suburban public schools. Rita Jones Turner was one of the first children to be bused to Vestavia Hills after a 1970 federal court order required the district to enroll African Americans from her neighborhood.
NEWS
March 21, 1987
Calvin E. Gross, who spent two controversial years as superintendent of schools in New York City, has died at his home in San Antonio, Tex., where he had been superintendent of a nearby school district. His brother, Kenneth Gross of Solana Beach, Calif., said the nationally known educator was 67 and died Saturday of leukemia. Gross' tenure in New York City (1963-65) was marked by struggles toward integration.
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