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Intellectual Properties

BUSINESS
January 18, 1992 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trade officials and business leaders in Hong Kong expressed optimism Friday over resolving other trade disputes between the United States and China following an agreement between both countries to protect American intellectual property rights. Brian Chau, Hong Kong's secretary for trade and industry, said the news of the agreement has helped ease the mood of uncertainty hanging over Hong Kong trade and paves the way for a brighter future.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a victory for companies that develop genetically modified plants, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that seeds and seed-grown plants can be patented. The 6-2 ruling, which upheld a court of appeals decision, strengthens the intellectual property rights of the nation's largest seed biotechnology companies. If these protections had been struck down, companies such as DuPont, Monsanto Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ah, the power of an idea. The light bulb, the lightning rod, the airplane--creations of such pioneers as Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin and the Wright Brothers--are what made America great. Just ask the folks at the Inventors Workshop International-Ventura County chapter.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
When Mickey Mouse returned to China last year to star in a monthly Walt Disney Co. comic book, a Hong Kong private investigation team was on hand to make sure impostors didn't steal his limelight. IP Protect Services (China) Ltd., China's first foreign-invested joint venture specializing in protecting intellectual property, is helping Disney take a state publishing house to court for using Mickey in a competing comic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Letterman is talking softly in the escalating late-night talk-show war, while NBC may be preparing to use a big stick. NBC President Robert Wright said Tuesday that the network will fight to keep its former star from taking popular characters and features such as "Stupid Pet Tricks" and "Top 10" lists with him to CBS next month. "This is not about Dave; it's about intellectual properties and copyright protection," Wright told a gathering of television critics at the Universal Hilton.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S.-European agreement Friday over farm subsidies offers a historic opening for a global free trade agreement that could play to an American strength--this nation's dominance in the markets for services, ideas and intellectual property. Economists and trade experts said the apparent resolution of the brewing trade war with the European Community--especially France--has removed the biggest obstacle to the long-stalled worldwide trade negotiations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | JACK VALENTI, Jack Valenti is chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Assn. of America
In a recent discussion within the Clinton administration on how to respond to the theft of American intellectual property in too many countries, a high official of the Treasury Department is alleged to have said (referring to the pirating of movies): "What, get tough just to protect Mickey Mouse?"
BUSINESS
July 26, 2001 | DAVID STREITFELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Online auction house EBay Inc. said Wednesday that it had removed a piece of art for sale about the disappearance of Chandra Levy because of a complaint by Rep. Gary Condit (D-Ceres), who said it violated his intellectual property rights. "We were contacted by a representative from the congressman's office in Washington. . . . He believed the item was 'a violation of the congressman's right of publicity, based upon the use of his name or image,' " said EBay spokesman Kevin Pursglove.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | From Reuters
Private investigators of the 1990s--far removed from the traditional trench-coat-clad sleuths tracking marital indiscretions, have found a new line of business--the fight against intellectual-property crime. So-called intellectual-property enforcement is a response to the upsurge in brand counterfeiting, copyright piracy and illegal importing that market liberalization and cheaper manufacturing methods have made much easier.
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore came to this city on the Volga River on Wednesday to promote American investment in Russia's provinces and encourage its leaders to remove barriers to further economic development. The vice president, concluding four days of meetings with Russian Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, praised the progress Samara has made in luring foreign investors to rebuild its economy.
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