Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIntellectual Property
IN THE NEWS

Intellectual Property

NEWS
February 19, 1995 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese and U.S. negotiators edged closer this weekend to settling a dispute over copyright and intellectual property issues that has threatened to engage the two countries in a bitter trade war. In a significant advance, the U.S. Embassy in Beijing said Saturday that the two sides were talking about specific measures to increase enforcement of copyright and trademark laws.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
China criticized the Bush Administration on Saturday for including Beijing's trade practices in a special review that could lead to punitive tariffs on exports to American markets. The decision Friday by U.S. Trade Representative Carla Anderson Hills began a six-month legal process that could result in trade sanctions against China, India and Thailand for inadequately protecting intellectual property rights, such as copyrights and trade secrets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2000 | EDGAR BRONFMAN JR., Edgar Bronfman Jr. is chief executive officer of Seagram, parent company of Universal. This article was adapted from a recent speech
New technologies are creating tremendous opportunities for businesses and consumers. But like many innovations throughout history, today's digital technologies are also spawning serious and fundamental challenges. The opportunities that lie ahead are without question immense. But I want to sound a different note by addressing the challenges, specifically combating the dangerous and misguided notion that property is not property if it's on the Web, and the piracy that that notion perpetuates.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1992 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trade officials and business leaders in Hong Kong expressed optimism Friday over resolving other trade disputes between the United States and China following an agreement between both countries to protect American intellectual property rights. Brian Chau, Hong Kong's secretary for trade and industry, said the news of the agreement has helped ease the mood of uncertainty hanging over Hong Kong trade and paves the way for a brighter future.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1994 | Associated Press
Unable to resolve a dispute with China over intellectual property theft that targets American computer software, movies and tapes, the United States is preparing a list of punitive tariffs the Chinese warn could spark a trade war. Sources close to the negotiations said Friday the threatened trade sanctions will target more than $1 billion in Chinese products. The goal is to force the Chinese to halt what U.S. officials say are abuses that cost U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ah, the power of an idea. The light bulb, the lightning rod, the airplane--creations of such pioneers as Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin and the Wright Brothers--are what made America great. Just ask the folks at the Inventors Workshop International-Ventura County chapter.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1994 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time, a Chinese court has recognized a U.S. company's copyright, taking a critical step toward what experts say could be general protection for foreign goods and ideas in China. In a ruling Wednesday, the court agreed with Burbank-based Walt Disney Co. that a Chinese publisher and its distributor had pirated children's books bearing a Mickey Mouse logo and based on Disney's animated films. It was the first copyright violation case brought by a U.S.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | From Reuters
Private investigators of the 1990s--far removed from the traditional trench-coat-clad sleuths tracking marital indiscretions, have found a new line of business--the fight against intellectual-property crime. So-called intellectual-property enforcement is a response to the upsurge in brand counterfeiting, copyright piracy and illegal importing that market liberalization and cheaper manufacturing methods have made much easier.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1994 | JAMES EVANS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Instead of waiting for his day in court, PC Dynamics President Peter Avritch decided to go straight to the top in defending his company against what appeared to be an unreasonable patent-infringement lawsuit. Avritch sent two-foot-tall stuffed pink rabbits and pleas for help to U.S. Sens. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.). He spent days on the telephone enlisting support from colleagues and rivals. Perhaps most important, he told his tale of woe to the media.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|