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WORLD
October 2, 2012 | By David S. Cloud and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon, CIA and other U.S. intelligence agencies are assembling dossiers on suspects in the assault on the U.S. Consulate in eastern Libya that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans, a first step toward fulfilling President Obama's vow to bring the killers to justice, U.S. officials said. The Pentagon's Joint Special Operations Command and intelligence agencies "are starting to look at people who might have been involved and starting to tee up options," a U.S. official said.
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NATIONAL
January 17, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - President Obama proposed new safeguards for the government's vast surveillance of communications in the U.S. and abroad, adding more judicial review and disclosure requirements, but largely leaving in place programs that he said were needed to "remain vigilant in the face of threats. " In a speech Friday meant to quell concerns about U.S. spy practices, Obama said he recognized the unease many Americans have felt in the seven months since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden began to reveal details about the NSA's activities.
WORLD
June 6, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The men in police commando uniforms sat silent, recalled investigative journalist Umar Cheema, as he nervously repeated that he was a reporter and he wanted to see their supervisor. Blindfolded after being kidnapped last fall and thrown into a Toyota Land Cruiser, Cheema said, he was taken to a safe house outside Islamabad, stripped naked, forced to lie facedown on the floor, and beaten on his shoulders and hips, first with a leather strap, then with a long wooden rod. At one point, they threatened to sodomize him. "They said, 'When you cannot avoid rape, just enjoy it,'" Cheema recalled.
WORLD
April 25, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates - U.S. intelligence agencies now believe that Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime has used chemical weapons in its struggle to hold onto power, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Thursday. Hagel said that the White House sent a letter to members of Congress on Thursday morning disclosing that intelligence agencies had made that assessment, which followed a series of similar conclusions reached by Britain, France and most recently Israel. “The U.S. intelligence community assesses with varying degrees of confidence that the Syrian regime has used chemical weapons on a small scale in Syria, specifically the chemical agent sarin,” Hagel told reporters in Abu Dhabi, where he was wrapping up a weeklong Mideast trip that has been dominated by questions over Syria's alleged chemical weapons use. A day earlier, Hagel said that U.S. intelligence agencies were studying the issue and would not rush to make a determination.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
CIA Director Michael V. Hayden announced he would retire from the Air Force in July after 39 years in uniform but will continue in his intelligence post as a civilian. Hayden, who holds the rank of four-star general, said he was taking the step because of "practical considerations related to military retirement." He joined the CIA in 2006 but has continued to be paid by the Air Force. Hayden's decision to remain in uniform when he took the top CIA position raised some concern in Congress and the intelligence agencies that he might favor the tactical military agenda.
OPINION
November 24, 2013 | Doyle McManus
Remember Edward Snowden? For a while, the National Security Agency's renegade contractor seemed like the most influential man in American intelligence, even though he's been hiding out in Moscow. Snowden's disclosures touched off a wave of enthusiasm in Congress for reforming the NSA's surveillance practices - and anger overseas when he revealed that American spies were listening to foreign leaders' cellphone calls. But now, as Congress counts only a few working days remaining in its year, the momentum toward intelligence reform has slowed.
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
If you've made a Christmas gift list that includes online gaming this year, you may want to be checking that twice. Intelligence agencies in both Britain and the U.S. have been paying attention to how you play games online - not for the sporting interest but to look for potential terrorists, and to recruit some likely candidates for spycraft. Classified documents from Edward P. Snowden's filched trove were combed by the Guardian, ProPublica and the New York Times, which found that the online games that make a fortune for gaming companies are also a target-rich environment for intelligence agencies, which say they're looking for terrorist behavior cloaked behind fun and games.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2008 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Private contractors account for more than one-quarter of the core workforce at U.S. intelligence agencies, according to newly released government figures that underscore how much of the nation's spying work has been outsourced since the Sept. 11 attacks. The CIA and other spy agencies employ about 36,000 contractors in espionage-related jobs, in addition to approximately 100,000 full-time government workers, said Ronald Sanders, head of personnel for the U.S. intelligence community.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The FBI disclosed to a presidential board that it was involved in nearly 800 violations of laws, regulations or policies governing national security investigations from 2001 to 2008, but the government won't provide details or say whether anyone was disciplined, according to a report by a privacy watchdog group. The San Francisco-based Electronic Frontier Foundation sued under the Freedom of Information Act to obtain about 2,500 documents that the FBI submitted to the President's Intelligence Oversight Board.
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